Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Dioscorea batatas

Expand Messages
  • wildwillowkins
    If I may just add to this Dioscoria thread. I have had some tubers for several years now, growing on my south facing window sill here in Yorkshire. They have
    Message 1 of 14 , May 4, 2007
      If I may just add to this Dioscoria thread.

      I have had some tubers for several years now, growing on my south
      facing window sill here in Yorkshire. They have grown slowly and
      multiplied by producing pea sized babies.

      As over the years the tubers have grown bigger I have tried them
      outdoors and last year I had several do quite well, one developing
      to a size that would be worth harvesting. However I have put it in
      the cold frame which I am hoping will give a good result as it it
      brick lined and seems to get fairly warm. I used to have a perspex
      lid but it was too clumsy so now it is just a deep open brick lined
      bed. My garden is SSW facing on a slope with terraces built up
      mostly with dry limestone retaining walls.

      I have also put several in large terracotta coloured pots on the
      concrete platform above the cold frame and some more in a black pot
      in front of a south facing brick wall which really gets quite warm
      in the sun.

      We have had an unusually warm spring so far here in England and I
      have been astonished to find that I already have shoots showing in
      one of the terracotta coloured pots and the black one by the warm
      wall. I haven't kept any indoors this year as they seem to have
      done well outdoors and I want to see how far I can go with them.

      It has been slow progress with them for several years but I have
      always wondered if they would do better if the warmer trend in
      summers continued and it seems they have. I am trying to negotiate
      a patch in a nearby polytunnel where I would like to be able to set
      up a permanent patch where the mature tubers could be lifted while
      at the same time the babies were allowed to drop naturally to the
      ground and be tilled in. The tubers seem to like to migrate deeper
      as they get bigger and lifting them allows the smaller ones to fall
      into the broken earth.

      Up to now I have only really treated it as an exotic but if this
      warm trend continues I think it could really be of use.

      All the best,

      Claire
    • Michael Porter
      I think they are very good to eat --sounds like you may find a good growing place, good luck, --MichaelP wildwillowkins wrote:
      Message 2 of 14 , May 15, 2007
        I think they are very good to eat --sounds like you may find a good growing place, good luck, --MichaelP

        wildwillowkins <wildwillowkins@...> wrote: If I may just add to this Dioscoria thread.

        I have had some tubers for several years now, growing on my south
        facing window sill here in Yorkshire. They have grown slowly and
        multiplied by producing pea sized babies.

        As over the years the tubers have grown bigger I have tried them
        outdoors and last year I had several do quite well, one developing
        to a size that would be worth harvesting. However I have put it in
        the cold frame which I am hoping will give a good result as it it
        brick lined and seems to get fairly warm. I used to have a perspex
        lid but it was too clumsy so now it is just a deep open brick lined
        bed. My garden is SSW facing on a slope with terraces built up
        mostly with dry limestone retaining walls.

        I have also put several in large terracotta coloured pots on the
        concrete platform above the cold frame and some more in a black pot
        in front of a south facing brick wall which really gets quite warm
        in the sun.

        We have had an unusually warm spring so far here in England and I
        have been astonished to find that I already have shoots showing in
        one of the terracotta coloured pots and the black one by the warm
        wall. I haven't kept any indoors this year as they seem to have
        done well outdoors and I want to see how far I can go with them.

        It has been slow progress with them for several years but I have
        always wondered if they would do better if the warmer trend in
        summers continued and it seems they have. I am trying to negotiate
        a patch in a nearby polytunnel where I would like to be able to set
        up a permanent patch where the mature tubers could be lifted while
        at the same time the babies were allowed to drop naturally to the
        ground and be tilled in. The tubers seem to like to migrate deeper
        as they get bigger and lifting them allows the smaller ones to fall
        into the broken earth.

        Up to now I have only really treated it as an exotic but if this
        warm trend continues I think it could really be of use.

        All the best,

        Claire






        ---------------------------------
        Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
        Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • michael lasky
        please does anyone out there know anything about the propagation if centilla asiatica. i m getting ready too return o my house in tropical Bolivia and i want
        Message 3 of 14 , May 15, 2007
          please does anyone out there know anything about the propagation if
          centilla asiatica. i'm getting ready too return o my house in tropical
          Bolivia and i want to grow it there it is also known as gotu kola.

          thanks,

          megamalito.


          >From: Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@...>
          >Reply-To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          >To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Dioscorea batatas
          >Date: Tue, 15 May 2007 18:14:46 -0700 (PDT)
          >
          >I think they are very good to eat --sounds like you may find a good growing
          >place, good luck, --MichaelP
          >
          >wildwillowkins <wildwillowkins@...> wrote: If I may
          >just add to this Dioscoria thread.
          >
          >I have had some tubers for several years now, growing on my south
          >facing window sill here in Yorkshire. They have grown slowly and
          >multiplied by producing pea sized babies.
          >
          >As over the years the tubers have grown bigger I have tried them
          >outdoors and last year I had several do quite well, one developing
          >to a size that would be worth harvesting. However I have put it in
          >the cold frame which I am hoping will give a good result as it it
          >brick lined and seems to get fairly warm. I used to have a perspex
          >lid but it was too clumsy so now it is just a deep open brick lined
          >bed. My garden is SSW facing on a slope with terraces built up
          >mostly with dry limestone retaining walls.
          >
          >I have also put several in large terracotta coloured pots on the
          >concrete platform above the cold frame and some more in a black pot
          >in front of a south facing brick wall which really gets quite warm
          >in the sun.
          >
          >We have had an unusually warm spring so far here in England and I
          >have been astonished to find that I already have shoots showing in
          >one of the terracotta coloured pots and the black one by the warm
          >wall. I haven't kept any indoors this year as they seem to have
          >done well outdoors and I want to see how far I can go with them.
          >
          >It has been slow progress with them for several years but I have
          >always wondered if they would do better if the warmer trend in
          >summers continued and it seems they have. I am trying to negotiate
          >a patch in a nearby polytunnel where I would like to be able to set
          >up a permanent patch where the mature tubers could be lifted while
          >at the same time the babies were allowed to drop naturally to the
          >ground and be tilled in. The tubers seem to like to migrate deeper
          >as they get bigger and lifting them allows the smaller ones to fall
          >into the broken earth.
          >
          >Up to now I have only really treated it as an exotic but if this
          >warm trend continues I think it could really be of use.
          >
          >All the best,
          >
          >Claire
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >---------------------------------
          >Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
          > Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >

          _________________________________________________________________
          Catch suspicious messages before you open them´┐Żwith Windows Live Hotmail.
          http://imagine-windowslive.com/hotmail/?locale=en-us&ocid=TXT_TAGHM_migration_HM_mini_protection_0507
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.