Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Kiwi

Expand Messages
  • Paul
    I have a Chinesis variety of Kiwi that I planted 18 months ago. It is situated against an east and south wall in the garden. Last year it grew well to about
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 1 7:43 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Kiwi

      I have a Chinesis variety of Kiwi that I planted 18 months ago. It is situated against an east and south wall in the garden. Last year it grew well to about 7ft in length. Although it may be sitated in a place that collects frost, I mulched it well in the winter and it started off well this spring. However, it now has gone very limp and growth buds are stunted. The plant has plenty of water and the stem is not damaged. I can see no evidence of any significant pest  damage. Has anyone got any idea what might be wrong>

      Thanks in anticipation.

      Paul Charnock

    • Ken Fern
      KiwiDear Paul What has almost certainly happened is that the plant has been affected by frost. Whilst Kiwis are quite hardy when they are dormant, the young
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 6 12:56 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Kiwi
        Dear Paul
         
        What has almost certainly happened is that the plant has been affected by frost. Whilst Kiwis are quite hardy when they are dormant, the young growth can be damaged by even quite light frosts. I would suggest, if possible, that you relocate the plant during next winter so that it is facing west or south-west instead of east since this will give it shade from the morning sun and therefore help to protect it from frost damage. In addition, if it could be placed in the lightly dappled shade of trees then this will give further protection. If you are unable to do either of these things, then covering the young shoots in the spring with a net curtain if frost threatens can also help.
         
        Frost damage plants will usually recover quite well, though it does slow down growth and can also prevent flowering and fruiting. I also note that you only have one plant. Most kiwi fruits are either male or female, one male being sufficient to pollinate about 5 females. There are also a few hermaphrodite varieties now available from plant nurseries. If you do not have a hermaphrodite form (such as 'Solo' or 'Jeanine') then you will need to find out the sex of your plant and obtain another plant of the opposite sex if you require the fruit. If your plant is female, then a hermaphrodite form will pollinate it and also fruit itself.
         
        Hope this is of help.
         
        Love
         
        Ken Fern
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Paul
        Sent: Saturday, June 01, 2002 3:43 PM
        Subject: [pfaf] Kiwi

        I have a Chinesis variety of Kiwi that I planted 18 months ago. It is situated against an east and south wall in the garden. Last year it grew well to about 7ft in length. Although it may be sitated in a place that collects frost, I mulched it well in the winter and it started off well this spring. However, it now has gone very limp and growth buds are stunted. The plant has plenty of water and the stem is not damaged. I can see no evidence of any significant pest  damage. Has anyone got any idea what might be wrong>

        Thanks in anticipation.

        Paul Charnock



        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      • Paul
        Thanks for the advice Ken. In actual fact I think I misled you regarding its location. The Wall is on the east side of the garden so it is protected from the
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 6 6:06 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Kiwi

          Thanks for the advice Ken. In actual fact I think I misled you regarding its location. The Wall is on the east side of the garden so it is protected from the east and north, though in a dip, hence my concern over possible frost pocket.

           

          Actually, since my email, the plant has made a remarkable recovery, typical! I think it was just suffering from a lack of attention. Another less romantic but maybe more realistic reason is that because it is against a wall, although the surface 2 inches or so were wet, below that may have been dry. I have inserted a plastic tube into the ground and watered into that. This meant that water was definitely getting down to root level and the plant recovered almost immediately.

           

          I take your point about the spring frosts though and next feb I will definitely give the fleece I bought several years ago at extortionate cost, a chance to pay for itself.

           

          The Kiwi is a self fertile variety, though I should think it will crop better anyway if it has friends around. I know I certainly do. Kiwi’s aren’t cheap though so I thought I would give one a couple of years and if everything was ok get another then.

           

          Thanks again

           

          Paul J

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Ken Fern [mailto:ken.fern@...]
          Sent: 06 June 2002 08:56
          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [pfaf] Kiwi

           

          Dear Paul

           

          What has almost certainly happened is that the plant has been affected by frost. Whilst Kiwis are quite hardy when they are dormant, the young growth can be damaged by even quite light frosts. I would suggest, if possible, that you relocate the plant during next winter so that it is facing west or south-west instead of east since this will give it shade from the morning sun and therefore help to protect it from frost damage. In addition, if it could be placed in the lightly dappled shade of trees then this will give further protection. If you are unable to do either of these things, then covering the young shoots in the spring with a net curtain if frost threatens can also help.

           

          Frost damage plants will usually recover quite well, though it does slow down growth and can also prevent flowering and fruiting. I also note that you only have one plant. Most kiwi fruits are either male or female, one male being sufficient to pollinate about 5 females. There are also a few hermaphrodite varieties now available from plant nurseries. If you do not have a hermaphrodite form (such as 'Solo' or 'Jeanine') then you will need to find out the sex of your plant and obtain another plant of the opposite sex if you require the fruit. If your plant is female, then a hermaphrodite form will pollinate it and also fruit itself.

           

          Hope this is of help.

           

          Love

           

          Ken Fern

          ----- Original Message -----

          From: Paul

          Sent: Saturday, June 01, 2002 3:43 PM

          Subject: [pfaf] Kiwi

           

          I have a Chinesis variety of Kiwi that I planted 18 months ago. It is situated against an east and south wall in the garden. Last year it grew well to about 7ft in length. Although it may be sitated in a place that collects frost, I mulched it well in the winter and it started off well this spring. However, it now has gone very limp and growth buds are stunted. The plant has plenty of water and the stem is not damaged. I can see no evidence of any significant pest  damage. Has anyone got any idea what might be wrong>

          Thanks in anticipation.

          Paul Charnock



          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.