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Forest Gardens

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  • Peggy
    Does anybody have any info on forest gardens? Thanks, Peg
    Message 1 of 21 , Mar 14, 2007
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      Does anybody have any info on forest gardens? Thanks, Peg
    • bslark@aol.com
      Hi Peg If you are in the UK Best resource is at _http://www.agroforestry.co.uk/_ (http://www.agroforestry.co.uk/) Ken Ferns book plants for a future is also
      Message 2 of 21 , Mar 14, 2007
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        Hi Peg

        If you are in the UK

        Best resource is at _http://www.agroforestry.co.uk/_
        (http://www.agroforestry.co.uk/)

        Ken Ferns book "plants for a future" is also very helpful as is the PFAF
        database which can be accessed from _http://www.pfaf.org/_ (http://www.pfaf.org/)

        I have a 4 acre FG in West Wales it is only 4 years old but beginning to
        take shape if you would like to visit you would be most welcome. The largest
        most advanced FG I know is at the ART HQ in Devon it is 12 years old and is 2
        acres, an essential visit.

        Good luck


        Bruce Slark
        _bslark@..._ (mailto:bslark@...)




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Porter
        where do you live,? --I garden my forest in my swamp, in Florida, --but this may not apply, --Michael porter Peggy wrote: Does
        Message 3 of 21 , Mar 14, 2007
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          where do you live,? --I garden my forest in my swamp, in Florida, --but this may not apply, --Michael porter

          Peggy <peg6012@...> wrote: Does anybody have any info on forest gardens? Thanks, Peg






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        • Peggy Rush
          I live in MO zone 5. Thanks for the info on the website. Peg ... It s here! Your new message! Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar. [Non-text
          Message 4 of 21 , Mar 15, 2007
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            I live in MO zone 5. Thanks for the info on the website. Peg

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          • Gail Lloyd
            If there is not much sun in your forest, you could probably grow mushrooms. If your forest is pine trees, you can grow plants that like acidic soil. You
            Message 5 of 21 , Mar 16, 2007
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              If there is not much sun in your forest, you could probably grow mushrooms. If your forest is pine trees, you can grow plants that like acidic soil. You could also grow pine trees for the pine nuts. Do a google search on forest gardens - there's a book on forest gardens for sale on http://www.edibleforestgardens.com/about_book. Most veggies have to have about 6 hrs sunlight each day.

              Gail

              Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@...> wrote:
              where do you live,? --I garden my forest in my swamp, in Florida, --but this may not apply, --Michael porter

              Peggy <peg6012@...> wrote: Does anybody have any info on forest gardens? Thanks, Peg

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            • Michael Porter
              I grew Ginseng ,Blood root , and Dioscorea batatas [Chinese wild yam] and a few others when living in that growing zone, in 50 to 85% shade --Michael Porter
              Message 6 of 21 , Mar 16, 2007
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                I grew Ginseng ,Blood root , and Dioscorea batatas [Chinese wild yam] and a few others when living in that growing zone, in 50 to 85% shade --Michael Porter

                Gail Lloyd <gardenchick1949@...> wrote: If there is not much sun in your forest, you could probably grow mushrooms. If your forest is pine trees, you can grow plants that like acidic soil. You could also grow pine trees for the pine nuts. Do a google search on forest gardens - there's a book on forest gardens for sale on http://www.edibleforestgardens.com/about_book. Most veggies have to have about 6 hrs sunlight each day.

                Gail

                Michael Porter <michaels4gardens@...> wrote:
                where do you live,? --I garden my forest in my swamp, in Florida, --but this may not apply, --Michael porter

                Peggy <peg6012@...> wrote: Does anybody have any info on forest gardens? Thanks, Peg

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              • Traveler in Thyme
                I have a forest garden , which in Texas translates to hot, dry shade under cedars and oaks that will grow nothing but rocks. Still, we have hacked out
                Message 7 of 21 , Mar 17, 2007
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                  I have a "forest garden", which in Texas translates to "hot, dry shade under cedars and oaks that will grow nothing but rocks." Still, we have hacked out over 1,000 square feet of pretty places and food plots, by thinning the trees, building terraces from the logs and rocks, and backfilling with many dollars and hours worth of improved soil. It can be done!


                  ---Marcia Cash
                  Traveler in Thyme
                  http://www.travelerinthyme.com


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • sustain_ability@123mail.org
                  Hello Marcia, I would love to know more. I have rocks upon rocks and the growing season for gardens can be as short as 60 days between killer frosts. Are you
                  Message 8 of 21 , Mar 17, 2007
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                    Hello Marcia,
                    I would love to know more. I have rocks upon rocks and the growing
                    season for gardens can be as short as 60 days between killer frosts. Are
                    you able to provide any references or links?
                    George
                    http://transitions.stumbleupon.com

                    On Sat, 17 Mar 2007 09:12:25 -0500, "Traveler in Thyme"
                    <marcia@...> said:
                    > I have a "forest garden", which in Texas translates to "hot, dry shade
                    > under cedars and oaks that will grow nothing but rocks." Still, we
                    > have hacked out over 1,000 square feet of pretty places and food plots,
                    > by thinning the trees, building terraces from the logs and rocks, and
                    > backfilling with many dollars and hours worth of improved soil. It can
                    > be done!
                    >
                    >
                    > ---Marcia Cash
                    > Traveler in Thyme
                    > http://www.travelerinthyme.com
                    >

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                  • Dee Harris
                    Now Marcia has my attention. My husband s GI loan is slated for Texas and his Federal GI loan any where in the US he wants. Of course, if I want him to get
                    Message 9 of 21 , Mar 17, 2007
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                      Now Marcia has my attention. My husband's GI loan is slated for Texas and his Federal GI loan any where in the US he wants. Of course, if I want him to get both then I would have to insist on Northern Texas close to Dallas, as close to the Rio Grande as I can get. LOL
                      Wolf

                      Traveler in Thyme <marcia@...> wrote:
                      I have a "forest garden", which in Texas translates to "hot, dry shade under cedars and oaks that will grow nothing but rocks." Still, we have hacked out over 1,000 square feet of pretty places and food plots, by thinning the trees, building terraces from the logs and rocks, and backfilling with many dollars and hours worth of improved soil. It can be done!

                      ---Marcia Cash
                      Traveler in Thyme
                      http://www.travelerinthyme.com

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








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                    • Traveler in Thyme
                      Now, Wolf, North Texas is by the Red River, the Rio Grande is the border of Mexico, down south. Two totally different worlds, garden-wise. I d take North
                      Message 10 of 21 , Mar 18, 2007
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                        Now, Wolf, North Texas is by the Red River, the Rio Grande is the border of Mexico, down south. Two totally different worlds, garden-wise. I'd take North Texas, too, but it's all covered up with metroplex. My grandmother's farm was the corner of Belt Line and Plano roads........way out in the cotton fields during the 50's, now it's so far buried in the suburbs you just can't get there from here. Deep, black soil under all those strip malls and parking lots, though.

                        And George, where do you live, with a 60-day growing season? We have those, too ------ three of them: winter, spring, and fall. Summer is our killing season, everything just bakes. So I"m really into short-season hybrid veggies, most of the heirlooms I"ve tried take so long to make squash or tomatoes they expire from heat stroke before they turn a profit on the crop. We have much better luck with winter greens, and probably eat healthier off the weeds than the summer veggies.

                        As for rocks, if you water it only grows more rocks? Same here. Then you pick up all the little rocks (your squat thrust exercise for the day), and pile them in long lines for terraces and bed borders. I use them for mulch, actually, they keep the moisture and shade in the soil. Rock mulch attracts grubs and scorpions, though, so be sure to turn them over once in a while to catch those nasty critters. We have rhinocerous beetle grubs as big as a man's thumb, and Blanco is the Scorpion Capitol of the World, or it should be.......

                        Speaking of mulch, we have seen 3 of the biggest coral snakes on record (I checked) living in the deep, dry oak leaf mulch of the forest edges, or under the deep hay in the garden. They are more afraid of me than I of them, but my dumb dog had one cornered and was going to get hurt, so I smashed it with a rock. Put it in the freezer, so everyone who opens the door gets a spook, even me, and I know it's in there (LOL) This was the "tiny" coral snake of the trio, it's only 25 inches long. That's big for a coral snake, isn't it? I love snakes.

                        Then there are the fire ants that love holing up under rock walls where you can't get to them. I'm so glad we've been having ant prevention discussions here.

                        ---Marcia Cash
                        Traveler in Thyme
                        http://www.travelerinthyme.com







                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Pat Meadows
                        ... There are some *really* fast open-pollinated (heirloom) tomatoes. Glacier is one - Fedco carries it, as do others. Take a look here too, if you re
                        Message 11 of 21 , Mar 18, 2007
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                          On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 09:32:24 -0500, you wrote:

                          >Now, Wolf, North Texas is by the Red River, the Rio Grande is the border of Mexico, down south. Two totally different worlds, garden-wise. I'd take North Texas, too, but it's all covered up with metroplex. My grandmother's farm was the corner of Belt Line and Plano roads........way out in the cotton fields during the 50's, now it's so far buried in the suburbs you just can't get there from here. Deep, black soil under all those strip malls and parking lots, though.
                          >
                          >And George, where do you live, with a 60-day growing season? We have those, too ------ three of them: winter, spring, and fall. Summer is our killing season, everything just bakes. So I"m really into short-season hybrid veggies, most of the heirlooms I"ve tried take so long to make squash or tomatoes they expire from heat stroke before they turn a profit on the crop. We have much better luck with winter greens, and probably eat healthier off the weeds than the summer veggies.
                          >

                          There are some *really* fast open-pollinated (heirloom) tomatoes.

                          Glacier is one - Fedco carries it, as do others. Take a look here too, if
                          you're interested in fast tomatoes:

                          http://www.psrseed.com/

                          Especially, see: http://www.psrseed.com/earlytomatoseed.html

                          They also have Glacier. Some of their selections (all of which are
                          open-pollinated) may be of use to you.

                          I'm trying Forest Fire and Polar Gem for my early tomatoes this year: 40-50
                          days after transplanting is EXTREMELY FAST. I've never seen a hybrid
                          tomato that claimed to be nearly that fast.

                          I've grown Glacier several years, and it is a very valuable early tomato,
                          IMHO.

                          These are all northern tomatoes, bred for the north. But maybe if you grow
                          them in winter, they'd be suitable for your area.

                          Pat
                          -- in Pennsylvania's Northern Tier
                          Help save the world: eat local food!
                          Blog: http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com/
                        • sustain_ability@123mail.org
                          Thanks, Pat. That s excellent advice. My spread is in the Laurentian Hills (Mountains) west-northwest of Montreal. The hills are not large enough (e.g. the
                          Message 12 of 21 , Mar 18, 2007
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                            Thanks, Pat. That's excellent advice.

                            My spread is in the Laurentian Hills (Mountains) west-northwest of
                            Montreal. The hills are not large enough (e.g. the Himalayas) to block
                            the polar fronts and freeze ups. The predominant conifers reflect the
                            acidic soil and also act as a temperature modifier (the needles act to
                            slow the downward rush of cold air and allow it to better exchange any
                            heat with the warmer air being displaced). A huge conifer died a few
                            years ago and the apple tree directly underneath suffered frost kill
                            during bloom season.

                            City apartment sprouted chestnut plants died a cold death when I
                            foolishly transplanted them into the cold, snow melt drenched soil a few
                            years ago. Now I have a million square feet of French-made imported row
                            cover.

                            How and why the recently migrated deer survive the winter and reproduce
                            is a puzzle to me, unless it's a reaction to urban sprawl and not due to
                            a shortage of food "upstream" in the higher elevations away from
                            civilization. There are people raising chickens in the area (I hear the
                            rooster). Another problem is that "cadastral reform" using GPS is moving
                            at a glacial pace. I need to know, e.g. if a stream traverses my land.

                            I dream of tilapia or trout fish farming (excavating countless rocks
                            without dynamite and heavy equipment by moving only the "less than one
                            ton" items by hand winch) and greenhouse growing. I will need Passive
                            Annual Heat Storage, wind breaks that also channel the wind to generate
                            power, redundancy to prevent catastrophic loss, heat shielding from
                            baking sunlight.. Extreme flexibility will enable one to thrive, I'm
                            hoping. Mere survival won't satisfy the critics.

                            Amory has it easier, I think. His latitudinal location is much further
                            south. There is a Penn. man growing citrus fruit in a greenhouse, if I
                            remember correctly. Penn. mountains are higher than me - I'm only at
                            about 1000 feet. What is your elevation, Pat? I remember the mainly
                            deciduous forest while driving through the coal-rich Pocono range.

                            George
                            http://transitions.stumbleupon.com


                            On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 14:34:10 -0500, "Pat Meadows" <pat@...>
                            said:

                            > >And George, where do you live, with a 60-day growing season? We have those, too ------ three of them: winter, spring, and fall. Summer is our killing season, everything just bakes. So I"m really into short-season hybrid veggies, most of the heirlooms I"ve tried take so long to make squash or tomatoes they expire from heat stroke before they turn a profit on the crop. We have much better luck with winter greens, and probably eat healthier off the weeds than the summer veggies.

                            --
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                          • Dee Harris
                            I was exhausted when I wrote that, Pat so it s a wonder that I was even able to see straight much less think straight. By the way, have you ever been to the
                            Message 13 of 21 , Mar 18, 2007
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                              I was exhausted when I wrote that, Pat so it's a wonder that I was even able to see straight much less think straight. By the way, have you ever been to the Big Bend area? It's beautiful down there.
                              As for the plants dying of heat stroke, well, I've got some ideas on that that I want to try out before listing them. I've also been putting some thought into underground or cave planting. Up in Northeastern Oklahoma, there are a lot of caves and underground streams. That takes care of the electrical problem, so all I would need to do is to come up with a way to contineously circulate the air and I have one or two ideas on that one as well, but again I want to try it out first.
                              Wolf

                              Pat Meadows <pat@...> wrote:
                              On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 09:32:24 -0500, you wrote:

                              >Now, Wolf, North Texas is by the Red River, the Rio Grande is the border of Mexico, down south. Two totally different worlds, garden-wise. I'd take North Texas, too, but it's all covered up with metroplex. My grandmother's farm was the corner of Belt Line and Plano roads........way out in the cotton fields during the 50's, now it's so far buried in the suburbs you just can't get there from here. Deep, black soil under all those strip malls and parking lots, though.
                              >
                              >And George, where do you live, with a 60-day growing season? We have those, too ------ three of them: winter, spring, and fall. Summer is our killing season, everything just bakes. So I"m really into short-season hybrid veggies, most of the heirlooms I"ve tried take so long to make squash or tomatoes they expire from heat stroke before they turn a profit on the crop. We have much better luck with winter greens, and probably eat healthier off the weeds than the summer veggies.
                              >

                              There are some *really* fast open-pollinated (heirloom) tomatoes.

                              Glacier is one - Fedco carries it, as do others. Take a look here too, if
                              you're interested in fast tomatoes:

                              http://www.psrseed.com/

                              Especially, see: http://www.psrseed.com/earlytomatoseed.html

                              They also have Glacier. Some of their selections (all of which are
                              open-pollinated) may be of use to you.

                              I'm trying Forest Fire and Polar Gem for my early tomatoes this year: 40-50
                              days after transplanting is EXTREMELY FAST. I've never seen a hybrid
                              tomato that claimed to be nearly that fast.

                              I've grown Glacier several years, and it is a very valuable early tomato,
                              IMHO.

                              These are all northern tomatoes, bred for the north. But maybe if you grow
                              them in winter, they'd be suitable for your area.

                              Pat
                              -- in Pennsylvania's Northern Tier
                              Help save the world: eat local food!
                              Blog: http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com/







                              test'; ">

                              ---------------------------------
                              Food fight? Enjoy some healthy debate
                              in the Yahoo! Answers Food & Drink Q&A.

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                            • Caribe704@aol.com
                              I have a spot in the mountains near Boone, NC I want to get some crops started on but cant be there to manage them just yet. many of the fruit trees I have
                              Message 14 of 21 , Mar 19, 2007
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                                I have a spot in the mountains near Boone, NC I want to get some crops
                                started on but cant be there to manage them just yet. many of the fruit trees I
                                have planted havent made it from one trip to the next, a few pine trees are all
                                that survived, (not pinion trees)



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                              • Pat Meadows
                                ... We re at about 1700 feet. We are not in the Poconos, but considerably west of there. We are in the Appalachians. We re not on a hilltop, however - the
                                Message 15 of 21 , Mar 19, 2007
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                                  On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 18:39:01 -0400, you wrote:

                                  >
                                  >Amory has it easier, I think. His latitudinal location is much further
                                  >south. There is a Penn. man growing citrus fruit in a greenhouse, if I
                                  >remember correctly. Penn. mountains are higher than me - I'm only at
                                  >about 1000 feet. What is your elevation, Pat? I remember the mainly
                                  >deciduous forest while driving through the coal-rich Pocono range.

                                  We're at about 1700 feet. We are not in the Poconos, but considerably west
                                  of there. We are in the Appalachians. We're not on a hilltop, however -
                                  the hilltops are higher, maybe up to around 2500 feet.

                                  (Of course, from a larger point of view, I suppose the Poconos are part of
                                  the Appalachians. The Poconos are more of a high plateau, however. Once
                                  you're on top, you don't see hills much. Our area is more
                                  traditional-looking hills and valleys.)

                                  Our altitude gives us a climate comparable to one considerably north of us,
                                  such in as Maine, for example. We have a short frost free season and very
                                  cool summer nights. Tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants do better under
                                  plastic here and we grow them in (an unheated) hoophouse, for the most
                                  part.

                                  The Penn man growing citrus in a greenhouse is possibly at Penn State
                                  University, in State College, PA. That's about 100 miles southwest of us.
                                  I don't know its elevation. They do a lot of 'plasticulture' work.

                                  http://plasticulture.cas.psu.edu/

                                  However, he could be at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia - a
                                  really warm climate, compared to ours! People can grow fig trees there.

                                  Pat
                                  -- in Pennsylvania's Northern Tier
                                  Help save the world: eat local food!
                                  Blog: http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com/
                                • Traveler in Thyme
                                  Here in Blanco, Texas, I m at 1650 ft, but it s just a ridge in the hill country, no mountains around here! I was so surprised to find out we are higher than
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Mar 19, 2007
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                                    Here in Blanco, Texas, I'm at 1650 ft, but it's just a ridge in the hill country, no mountains around here! I was so surprised to find out we are higher than our friends in Jasper, Arkansas, in the heart of the Ozarks, and way higher than the Appalachians, mostly. That's because our lake levels are at 700 feet and up, so the hills don't seem so high from ground zero, while the Ozarks are steep because their rivers are closer to sea level at the Mississippi.

                                    Our elevation brings no relief from heat, though. It's hot, dry, and rocky, with scrubby live oaks and junipers that live on fog and humidity. It never ceases to amaze me when it's bone dry drought but the humidity is in the 90's. Such a pleasant ecosystem (not). Wresting a garden from dead dry shade is the work of a lifethyme!


                                    ---Marcia Cash
                                    Traveler in Thyme
                                    http://www.travelerinthyme.com


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • sustain_ability@123mail.org
                                    All I know about fruit trees is that northerly exposure is better because any late frosts kill the earlier blooming trees on the warmer slopes. But nut trees
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Mar 20, 2007
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                                      All I know about fruit trees is that northerly exposure is better
                                      because any late frosts kill the earlier blooming trees on the warmer
                                      slopes.
                                      But nut trees would be my choice also in your "warmer" area. Contact
                                      your local Extension office (if that's what they're called) for more
                                      precise info. And choose nurseries that specialize in hardy varieties.
                                      Of course, they charge more than Walmart.
                                      George

                                      On Mon, 19 Mar 2007 06:30:40 EDT, Caribe704@... said:
                                      > I have a spot in the mountains near Boone, NC I want to get some crops
                                      > started on but cant be there to manage them just yet. many of the fruit
                                      > trees I
                                      > have planted havent made it from one trip to the next, a few pine trees
                                      > are all
                                      > that survived, (not pinion trees)
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                                    • Paul S. Hetrick
                                      Peggy, I m in Douglas County, Mo. There are other people in this area who are interested in/starting forest gardens. If you are any where near Ava, we could
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Mar 31, 2007
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                                        Peggy,

                                        I'm in Douglas County, Mo. There are other people in this area who are
                                        interested in/starting forest gardens. If you are any where near Ava,
                                        we could be (and should be) compairing notes.

                                        Drop me a line at homesteadpaul@... or join my Ozark-Homestead
                                        list here on Yahoo groups and send a note there. The subject of forest
                                        gardens hasn't come up there much yet, but there is a lot of people
                                        with gardening and woodcraft experience.

                                        ==>paul



                                        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Peggy Rush <peg6012@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > I live in MO zone 5. Thanks for the info on the website. Peg
                                        >
                                        > ---------------------------------
                                        > It's here! Your new message!
                                        > Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                      • Geir Flatabø
                                        It wold be nice for us in other parts of the world to know what Mo and Ava means where to look at the map... Geir Flatabø ... [Non-text portions of this
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Mar 31, 2007
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                                          It wold be nice for us in other parts of the world to know what Mo and Ava
                                          means
                                          where to look at the map...
                                          Geir Flatabø

                                          2007/3/31, Paul S. Hetrick <homesteadpaul@...>:
                                          >
                                          > Peggy,
                                          >
                                          > I'm in Douglas County, Mo. There are other people in this area who are
                                          > interested in/starting forest gardens. If you are any where near Ava,
                                          > we could be (and should be) compairing notes.
                                          >
                                          > Drop me a line at homesteadpaul@... or join my Ozark-Homestead
                                          > list here on Yahoo groups and send a note there. The subject of forest
                                          > gardens hasn't come up there much yet, but there is a lot of people
                                          > with gardening and woodcraft experience.
                                          >
                                          > ==>paul
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Peggy Rush <peg6012@...> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > I live in MO zone 5. Thanks for the info on the website. Peg
                                          > >
                                          > > ---------------------------------
                                          > > It's here! Your new message!
                                          > > Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.
                                          > >
                                          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >


                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Patricia Jones
                                          Hi, MO is the state of Missouri and I m assuming that Ava is a city in Missouri. It wold be nice for us in other parts of the world to know what Mo and Ava
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Apr 1, 2007
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                                            Hi,
                                            MO is the state of Missouri and I'm assuming that Ava is a city in
                                            Missouri.


                                            It wold be nice for us in other parts of the world to know what
                                            Mo and Ava
                                            means
                                            where to look at the map...
                                            Geir Flatab� ��

                                            2007/3/31, Paul S. Hetrick <homesteadpaul@...>:
                                            >
                                            >Peggy,
                                            >
                                            >I'm in Douglas County, Mo. There are other people in this
                                            area who are
                                            >interested in/starting forest gardens. If you are any where
                                            near Ava,
                                            >we could be (and should be) compairing notes.
                                            >
                                            >Drop me a line at homesteadpaul@... or join my
                                            Ozark-Homestead
                                            >list here on Yahoo groups and send a note there. The subject
                                            of forest
                                            >gardens hasn't come up there much yet, but there is a lot of
                                            people
                                            >with gardening and woodcraft experience.
                                            >
                                            >==>paul
                                            >
                                            >

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                                          • Paul S. Hetrick
                                            You are right that MO is Missouri, USA. Calling Ava a city is being a bit too polite though. It s a town of about 3000 people in the south- central part of
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Apr 1, 2007
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                                              You are right that MO is Missouri, USA. Calling Ava a city is being a
                                              bit too polite though. It's a town of about 3000 people in the south-
                                              central part of the state. That puts it in the Ozarks.

                                              Since the main reason I posted was to let Peggy know she wasn't the
                                              only one in the state interested, I was less polite than I usually am
                                              in assuming anybody reading. would either know where I was talking
                                              about, or wouldn't care.

                                              I also noticed though that yahoo tried to be helpfull and clipped my
                                              address out. It should have ended with a hotmail dot com

                                              ==>paul

                                              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Patricia Jones" <cherokee32@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Hi,
                                              > MO is the state of Missouri and I'm assuming that Ava is a city
                                              in
                                              > Missouri.
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > It wold be nice for us in other parts of the world to know what
                                              > Mo and Ava
                                              > means
                                              > where to look at the map...
                                              > Geir Flatab€ ¦ø
                                              >
                                              > 2007/3/31, Paul S. Hetrick <homesteadpaul@...>:
                                              > >
                                              > >Peggy,
                                              > >
                                              > >I'm in Douglas County, Mo. There are other people in this
                                              > area who are
                                              > >interested in/starting forest gardens. If you are any where
                                              > near Ava,
                                              > >we could be (and should be) compairing notes.
                                              > >
                                              > >Drop me a line at homesteadpaul@... or join my
                                              > Ozark-Homestead
                                              > >list here on Yahoo groups and send a note there. The subject
                                              > of forest
                                              > >gardens hasn't come up there much yet, but there is a lot of
                                              > people
                                              > >with gardening and woodcraft experience.
                                              > >
                                              > >==>paul
                                              > >
                                              > >
                                              >
                                              > _________________________________________________________________
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                                              >
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