Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Japanese Knotweed

Expand Messages
  • John Marshall
    I ve had to get rid of several clumps of this stuff which had infested areas of Cornish hedge here. After several years of unsuccessful attempts I have
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 15 7:47 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      I've had to get rid of several clumps of this stuff which had infested areas
      of Cornish hedge here. After several years of unsuccessful attempts I have
      developed this technique, which seems to work:

      * Soak some cocktail sticks in glyphosate mixed with oil.
      * Let the stalks grow to near maximum and then pull them from the
      base. Dry the stalks in sealed bags (for once black plastic bags have a use)
      and then burn them (the stalks not the bags).
      * With a nail or other spike, make holes in the top of the rhizomes
      and insert cocktail sticks. Use gloves for this operation to avoid skin
      punctures etc.
      * Some stalks will still appear. Leave them until late summer ( I
      leave them until September here).
      * Mix up a strong mix of Roundup, put it into a hand sprayer and cover
      adjacent foliage for protection before spraying the tops and undersides of
      the Knotweed leaves carefully.

      Don't remove the dead stalks until well into the winter. The roundup will
      have been translocated and will have done it's stuff by then.
      Using this method I was able to get rid of this dreadfull weed in one
      season, without any noticeable damage to the plant communities along my
      hedges.

      I hope this helps, even if I have had to admit to using a Monsanto product!

      Best wishes to all
      John Marshall


      http://www.godolphinhill.com



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dee Harris
      There is only one natural predator for such plants but I wouldn t suggest putting them in any garden since they spread faster than the plants do and that s
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 16 7:46 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        There is only one natural predator for such plants but I wouldn't suggest putting them in any garden since they spread faster than the plants do and that's grub worms. They will kill off anything in their area.
        Wolf

        Pat Meadows <pat@...> wrote:
        On Fri, 16 Feb 2007 06:30:41 -0800 (PST), you wrote:

        >Little wonder if it's as invasive as you say. Sounds like what burdock does.

        I think the prize for Horrible Invasive Plants goes to giant hogweed,
        however. That stuff is SCARY!

        http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/LANDS/weeds/pdf/Hogweed_factsheet.pdf

        I have never seen it, just read about it. I hope it stays that way.

        Pat

        --
        In the Appalachian Mountains in northern Pennsylvania
        Blog: http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com

        'Every one of us can do something to protect and
        care for our planet. We should live in such a way
        that makes a future possible.' - Thich Nhat Hanh








        test'; ">

        ---------------------------------
        Get your own web address.
        Have a HUGE year through Yahoo! Small Business.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.