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Re: [pfaf] Japanese Knotweed

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  • Dee Harris
    I haven t had a chance to get to the original post about Japanese Knotweed so can someone fill me in? Is Japanese Knotweed only good for breaking down compost
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 14, 2007
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      I haven't had a chance to get to the original post about Japanese Knotweed so can someone fill me in? Is Japanese Knotweed only good for breaking down compost or is it good for other uses?
      Wolf

      ingrid glass <ingrid_glass@...> wrote:

      >>>>>>
      ----Original Message Follows----
      From: "Liz Turner" <liz7@...>
      Reply-To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Re: [pfaf] Japanese Knotweed
      Date: Sun, 11 Jun 2006 22:31:03 +0100

      Dear All
      Just to add to the Japanese knotweed composting controversy... ! We actually
      did a trial composting it a few years ago on a project on Plymouth
      allotments. It would be illegal to move it to another site to compost
      because of the risk of bits dropping around. But its not illegal to compost
      it in situ. You can only compost the stems because the root will keep
      regrowing & spreading. However the stems if cut above the root stock will
      compost & die without re-growing. A piece of it fresh will of course re-grow
      but once wilted & started to decompose cannot do so. After cutting
      repeatedly for a few years, the root should be weakened & can be dug up &
      burnt.

      We undertook this trial on the advice of the Devon Community Composting
      Co-ordinator. The stems successfully composted without regrowth & show that
      this is a viable way to deal with the weed. Unfortunately we did not have
      enough people to continue the project & report on the findings in a formal
      way but the results we saw spoke for themselves & show an alternative to
      chemicals.
      Liz

      Hi Liz et al,

      Interesting that a certain aforementioned Environment Agency booklet (!)
      mentions several times the need to avoid spreading stem fragments when
      scything /cutting, & to either burn or bury 10m deep any such fragments
      along with rhizomes, implying that even bits of stem can regenerate into new
      plants. Maybe their advice is erring on the safe side? Good to hear about
      your successful experiments Liz, thanks.

      Incidentally, there is a Japanese Knotweed Officer at Swansea Council -
      the only one in this country as far as I know!

      Ingrid








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    • Dee Harris
      There is only one natural predator for such plants but I wouldn t suggest putting them in any garden since they spread faster than the plants do and that s
      Message 36 of 36 , Feb 16, 2007
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        There is only one natural predator for such plants but I wouldn't suggest putting them in any garden since they spread faster than the plants do and that's grub worms. They will kill off anything in their area.
        Wolf

        Pat Meadows <pat@...> wrote:
        On Fri, 16 Feb 2007 06:30:41 -0800 (PST), you wrote:

        >Little wonder if it's as invasive as you say. Sounds like what burdock does.

        I think the prize for Horrible Invasive Plants goes to giant hogweed,
        however. That stuff is SCARY!

        http://dnr.metrokc.gov/wlr/LANDS/weeds/pdf/Hogweed_factsheet.pdf

        I have never seen it, just read about it. I hope it stays that way.

        Pat

        --
        In the Appalachian Mountains in northern Pennsylvania
        Blog: http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com

        'Every one of us can do something to protect and
        care for our planet. We should live in such a way
        that makes a future possible.' - Thich Nhat Hanh








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