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Humanure

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  • Traveler in Thyme
    We maintain a humanure pile for two families, but the people next door entertain many druggies, homeless people, and hard cases, so there is no way I would use
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 22, 2006
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      We maintain a humanure pile for two families, but the people next door entertain many druggies, homeless people, and hard cases, so there is no way I would use the humanure on our land because some of "those people" have hepatitis and who-knows-what other diseases.    So she gets the compost for her fruit trees.   If it were only us contributing to the pile, I'd use it myself, because I know what we've been eating!
       
      No way could you ever convince me to take humanure from a community pile, even if it were composted for years and years.......
       
         ~~~Traveler in Thyme~~~
      http://www.travelerinthyme.com
    • Dee Harris
      There are herbs that you could add to the pile that may kill of the bacteria you speak of. Wolf Traveler in Thyme wrote: We maintain a
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 24, 2007
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        There are herbs that you could add to the pile that may kill of the bacteria you speak of.
        Wolf

        Traveler in Thyme <marcia@...> wrote:
        We maintain a humanure pile for two families, but the people next door entertain many druggies, homeless people, and hard cases, so there is no way I would use the humanure on our land because some of "those people" have hepatitis and who-knows-what other diseases. So she gets the compost for her fruit trees. If it were only us contributing to the pile, I'd use it myself, because I know what we've been eating!

        No way could you ever convince me to take humanure from a community pile, even if it were composted for years and years.......

        ~~~Traveler in Thyme~~~
        http://www.travelerinthyme.com







        test'; ">

        ---------------------------------
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        in the Yahoo! Answers Food & Drink Q&A.

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      • Warron
        Dear people, I am a newby at organics, and was surprised to find out about humanure . The idea that human waste could be composted in an open system safely
        Message 3 of 12 , Jan 26, 2007
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          Dear people,

          I am a newby at organics, and was surprised to find out
          about "humanure". The idea that human waste could be composted in an
          open system "safely" had never occured to me. I myself have a 3
          stage sceptic tank. The whole house contributes to this tank,
          toilets,bath, shower, washing machine etc. ( I live in a secluded
          area on a greek island and am not connected to any sewage mains). I
          also only use biodegrable cleaning products, soaps, shampoos etc.
          The tank is anaerobic (no pumping of oxygen into the system). When
          it is full I pump it out to my olive trees and have seen a large
          increase in olive oil productivity, but never dared to use it on my
          vegetable garden nor my cut herb business; only on my fruit trees.

          My questions are, how safe is "humanure", and is the system I am
          using a safe one? Never had any problems up till now that I have
          noticed, but maybe I am damaging the water table. I have a large
          water well and had the tank built at a 50m distance from my well
          hoping not to contaminate my water supply, even though it is a
          closed concrete structure (my concrete is porous). Is this a good
          distance? Have seen 'bacteria pellets' for tanks, should I use
          this? I am not squeamish but overly cautious, thats' the virgo in
          me.

          p.s. Should I donate some olive oil to speed up their "bowel
          movements" in their attempt to reach the 2 ton goal?! :)

          Light Life Love Liberty. LLLL

          regards,
          Warron


          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Rich Morris <mailinglists@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi all,
          > I've just had a call from Mirie one of the organisers of the
          climate
          > change camp, being held at the end of August.
          >
          > They are hoping to collect all their human waste and send it to
          someone
          > who could use it. They are expecting to have about 2 tons.
          >
          > Does anyone know of anyone who could cope with 2 tons of nutrients?
          > If so contant
          > Mirie 0777 498 751 debrirr@...
          >
          > All the best
          >
          > Rich
          > --
          > Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
          > Web: http://www.pfaf.org/
          > Post: 1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
          > Tel: 01208 872 963
          > Email: webweaver@...
          > PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
          >
        • Clinton McDowell
          Try using all that bizaare source humanure on any Bamboos you may have. With between 1250 up to 1400 species ...i´m sure the bambu would use all the humanure
          Message 4 of 12 , Jan 26, 2007
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            Try using all that bizaare source humanure on any Bamboos you may have. With between 1250 up to 1400 species ...i´m sure the bambu would use all the humanure yall sent it´s way...
            I just unloaded 8 wheelbarrows of the stuff (cleaning my ¨Clivus - Miltrum dry toilet) on my recently acquired Dendrocalamus gigantea, seems to be ¨eating it up¨, with no ill effects.
            The Chinese have been using ¨night soil for centuries....

            Dee Harris <corbywolf13@...> escribió:
            There are herbs that you could add to the pile that may kill of the bacteria you speak of.
            Wolf

            Traveler in Thyme <marcia@...> wrote:
            We maintain a humanure pile for two families, but the people next door entertain many druggies, homeless people, and hard cases, so there is no way I would use the humanure on our land because some of "those people" have hepatitis and who-knows-what other diseases. So she gets the compost for her fruit trees. If it were only us contributing to the pile, I'd use it myself, because I know what we've been eating!

            No way could you ever convince me to take humanure from a community pile, even if it were composted for years and years.......

            ~~~Traveler in Thyme~~~
            http://www.travelerinthyme.com


            test'; ">

            ---------------------------------
            Food fight? Enjoy some healthy debate
            in the Yahoo! Answers Food & Drink Q&A.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






            ---------------------------------
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          • Pat Meadows
            ... We have a septic tank as well; many rural areas in the USA still use them. ... My belief is that the remains of your septic tank are safe for use on your
            Message 5 of 12 , Jan 30, 2007
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              On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 20:47:15 -0000, you wrote:

              >
              > Dear people,
              >
              > I am a newby at organics, and was surprised to find out
              >about "humanure". The idea that human waste could be composted in an
              >open system "safely" had never occured to me. I myself have a 3
              >stage sceptic tank. The whole house contributes to this tank,
              >toilets,bath, shower, washing machine etc. ( I live in a secluded
              >area on a greek island and am not connected to any sewage mains). I
              >also only use biodegrable cleaning products, soaps, shampoos etc.
              >The tank is anaerobic (no pumping of oxygen into the system). When
              >it is full I pump it out to my olive trees and have seen a large
              >increase in olive oil productivity, but never dared to use it on my
              >vegetable garden nor my cut herb business; only on my fruit trees

              We have a septic tank as well; many rural areas in the USA still use them.

              > My questions are, how safe is "humanure", and is the system I am
              >using a safe one? Never had any problems up till now that I have
              >noticed, but maybe I am damaging the water table. I have a large
              >water well and had the tank built at a 50m distance from my well
              >hoping not to contaminate my water supply, even though it is a
              >closed concrete structure (my concrete is porous). Is this a good
              >distance? Have seen 'bacteria pellets' for tanks, should I use
              >this? I am not squeamish but overly cautious, thats' the virgo in
              >me.

              My belief is that the remains of your septic tank are safe for use on your
              olive trees. The humanure will not be in contact with the fruit of the
              trees (*unless* the olives fall off and lie on the ground - do they?).

              But from what I have read, it is definitely NOT safe for use on a vegetable
              garden. It is not composted; it has not been heated to a temperature
              sufficient to kill bacteria. Maybe you could compost it?

              Pat

              --
              In the Appalachian Mountains in northern Pennsylvania
              Blog: http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com

              'Every one of us can do something to protect and
              care for our planet. We should live in such a way
              that makes a future possible.' - Thich Nhat Hanh
            • Warron
              Pat, ... on your ... of the ... they?). Just about a month before picking the olive trees I stop watering the trees from the septic tank, as we lay nets on the
              Message 6 of 12 , Jan 31, 2007
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                Pat,
                > My belief is that the remains of your septic tank are safe for use
                on your
                > olive trees. The humanure will not be in contact with the fruit
                of the
                > trees (*unless* the olives fall off and lie on the ground - do
                they?).

                Just about a month before picking the olive trees I stop watering
                the trees from the septic tank, as we lay nets on the ground and I
                am too worried that there is still quite alot of "tank" bacteria in
                the upper soil surface, especially if it hasn't rained.


                > But from what I have read, it is definitely NOT safe for use on a
                vegetable
                > garden. It is not composted; it has not been heated to a
                temperature
                > sufficient to kill bacteria. Maybe you could compost it?

                Agreed! Any idea as how to compost it? The water is reasonably
                clear with a tinge of a brown hue. Maybe soaking straw in it and
                then composting the straw? And what temperature must the composting
                process reach, and for what duration of time at the specific temp?


                Regards
                Warron
                LLLL
              • Pat Meadows
                ... No, I don t know. You re way beyond my knowledge now. Sorry. Have you read The Humanure Handbook ? Maybe that would help. You can read it online:
                Message 7 of 12 , Jan 31, 2007
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                  On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 11:38:14 -0000, you wrote:


                  >
                  > Agreed! Any idea as how to compost it? The water is reasonably
                  >clear with a tinge of a brown hue. Maybe soaking straw in it and
                  >then composting the straw? And what temperature must the composting
                  >process reach, and for what duration of time at the specific temp?
                  >

                  No, I don't know. You're way beyond my knowledge now. Sorry.

                  Have you read 'The Humanure Handbook'? Maybe that would help.

                  You can read it online: http://www.weblife.org/humanure/default.html

                  Pat

                  --
                  In the Appalachian Mountains in northern Pennsylvania
                  Blog: http://www.entire-of-itself.blogspot.com

                  'Every one of us can do something to protect and
                  care for our planet. We should live in such a way
                  that makes a future possible.' - Thich Nhat Hanh
                • GRACE CRABB
                  you can use humanure as compost but if it is wet i.e. mixed with urine you will have to leave it to compost thoroughly for 2 years. This kills all know
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 4 1:42 PM
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                    you can use humanure as compost but if it is wet i.e. mixed with urine you will have to leave it to compost thoroughly for 2 years. This kills all know pathogens, especially in a warm country like yours. It is always safer to use humanure on trees, but if composted thoroughly but you can use it on the garden. The best way is to use a dry compost toilet, seperating urine that you can use as fertiliser. The shit should be mixed with a soak material so that it composts as the chamber fills. You can then close that chamber and start on another, leaving that poo and paper or sawdust etc to compost for a year or 2. It is then. Bacteria and invertebrates that live in compost piles are capable of digesting pretty much anything, even heavy metals. Your compost will probably be perfectly safe in a couple of months as the dangerous gut bacteria can not survive outside the gut for long, but it is better to be on the safe side.
                    Using the shit wet makes it more likely to carry nasty pathogans for longer as the environment is anoxic and those helpful bacteria can't survive.
                    Hope that helps
                    Grace

                    Warron <pinigardens@...> wrote:
                    Dear people,

                    I am a newby at organics, and was surprised to find out
                    about "humanure". The idea that human waste could be composted in an
                    open system "safely" had never occured to me. I myself have a 3
                    stage sceptic tank. The whole house contributes to this tank,
                    toilets,bath, shower, washing machine etc. ( I live in a secluded
                    area on a greek island and am not connected to any sewage mains). I
                    also only use biodegrable cleaning products, soaps, shampoos etc.
                    The tank is anaerobic (no pumping of oxygen into the system). When
                    it is full I pump it out to my olive trees and have seen a large
                    increase in olive oil productivity, but never dared to use it on my
                    vegetable garden nor my cut herb business; only on my fruit trees.

                    My questions are, how safe is "humanure", and is the system I am
                    using a safe one? Never had any problems up till now that I have
                    noticed, but maybe I am damaging the water table. I have a large
                    water well and had the tank built at a 50m distance from my well
                    hoping not to contaminate my water supply, even though it is a
                    closed concrete structure (my concrete is porous). Is this a good
                    distance? Have seen 'bacteria pellets' for tanks, should I use
                    this? I am not squeamish but overly cautious, thats' the virgo in
                    me.

                    p.s. Should I donate some olive oil to speed up their "bowel
                    movements" in their attempt to reach the 2 ton goal?! :)

                    Light Life Love Liberty. LLLL

                    regards,
                    Warron

                    --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Rich Morris <mailinglists@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi all,
                    > I've just had a call from Mirie one of the organisers of the
                    climate
                    > change camp, being held at the end of August.
                    >
                    > They are hoping to collect all their human waste and send it to
                    someone
                    > who could use it. They are expecting to have about 2 tons.
                    >
                    > Does anyone know of anyone who could cope with 2 tons of nutrients?
                    > If so contant
                    > Mirie 0777 498 751 debrirr@...
                    >
                    > All the best
                    >
                    > Rich
                    > --
                    > Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
                    > Web: http://www.pfaf.org/
                    > Post: 1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
                    > Tel: 01208 872 963
                    > Email: webweaver@...
                    > PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
                    >






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Traveler in Thyme
                    We let our humanure pile set for 2 years, and have 3 piles we rotate. The Chinese have been using night soil to fertilise rice paddies for millenium,
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 12 6:46 AM
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                      We let our humanure pile set for 2 years, and have 3 piles we rotate. The Chinese have been using "night soil" to fertilise rice paddies for millenium, which just goes to show that you can become immune to almost anything. I, however, do not trust our pile to use on the veggies, but we do spread it under the trees.

                      Last year, we both got intestinal crud after spreading the humanure, and I was sure we had killed ourselves. But talking on the phone with my family in Austin, they all had the same crud that week, so I think it was something "going around" and not contamination from the humanure. What a relief...!

                      I read in Discover magazine that hogs fed on corn fertilized with hog manure have much lower cholera rates that hogs fed on chemically fertilized corn. Makes sense to me.

                      ---Marcia Cash
                      Traveler in Thyme
                      http://www.travelerinthyme.com


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Cindy
                      ... Presumably you d heat the rice enough to kill bacteria and viruses when it s cooked. Prions wouldn t be killed, though, I don t think. I think I d keep it
                      Message 10 of 12 , Feb 12 9:00 AM
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                        --- Traveler in Thyme <marcia@...> wrote:

                        > We let our humanure pile set for 2 years, and have 3
                        > piles we rotate. The Chinese have been using
                        > "night soil" to fertilise rice paddies for
                        > millenium, which just goes to show that you can
                        > become immune to almost anything. I, however, do
                        > not trust our pile to use on the veggies, but we do
                        > spread it under the trees.

                        Presumably you'd heat the rice enough to kill bacteria
                        and viruses when it's cooked. Prions wouldn't be
                        killed, though, I don't think.

                        I think I'd keep it under the trees too.

                        Cindy



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