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  • von-fi@elonmerkki.net
    Hello, can t say about this in first hand (I come from nearly arctic climate), but maybe this project would help: http://www.nativeseednetwork.org/
    Message 1 of 8 , May 24, 2006
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      Hello,

      can't say about this in first hand (I come from nearly arctic climate),
      but maybe this project would help:

      http://www.nativeseednetwork.org/

      :) orava


      On Wed, May 24, 2006 at 12:13:47PM -0000, campolionel wrote:
      > Hello, I am new on the list. My name is Lionel, I am French. I do not
      > speak very well English and I ask you of me to excuse some. I live in
      > the south of France, about 50 km of the Mediterranean seaside. The
      > weather is very hot in summer, approximately 55 degrees Celsius in full
      > sun, and very cold in winter, approximately less 18 degrees last year.
      > I would like to know places in the United States where the climate
      > would be like mine. It rains in autumn and a little in winter, and the
      > summers are very dry. I bought little time ago the book "american
      > native ethnobotany", and I would like to inspire to me by the plants
      > used by the native ones which lived in the same climate as me. I really
      > hope you understood what I wanted to say…
      > Regards from south of France
      >
      > Lionel
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
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    • lionel campo
      Good evening Orava, many many thanks for the link ! Where re you from ? Regards from France Lionel ... Good evening Orava, many many thanks for the link !
      Message 2 of 8 , May 26, 2006
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        Good evening Orava,
        many many thanks for the link !
        Where're you from ?
        Regards from France
        Lionel

        Le 24 mai 06 à 18:34, von-fi@... a écrit :

        Hello,

        can't say about this in first hand (I come from nearly arctic climate),
        but maybe this project would help:

        http://www.nativeseednetwork.org/

        :) orava


      • Pat Meadows
        ... I understand. *Possibly* some places in New Mexico, California, Utah, Nevada, or Arizona - I am not sure (I live in the northeastern USA). Some of these
        Message 3 of 8 , May 27, 2006
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          On Wed, 24 May 2006 12:13:47 -0000, you wrote:

          >Hello, I am new on the list. My name is Lionel, I am French. I do not
          >speak very well English and I ask you of me to excuse some. I live in
          >the south of France, about 50 km of the Mediterranean seaside. The
          >weather is very hot in summer, approximately 55 degrees Celsius in full
          >sun, and very cold in winter, approximately less 18 degrees last year.
          >I would like to know places in the United States where the climate
          >would be like mine. It rains in autumn and a little in winter, and the
          >summers are very dry. I bought little time ago the book "american
          >native ethnobotany", and I would like to inspire to me by the plants
          >used by the native ones which lived in the same climate as me. I really
          >hope you understood what I wanted to say…
          >Regards from south of France
          >

          I understand. *Possibly* some places in New Mexico,
          California, Utah, Nevada, or Arizona - I am not sure (I live
          in the northeastern USA).

          Some of these areas are now, or used to be, inhabited by the
          Pueblo Indians; Hopis, Zunis, and others. And also by the
          Navajos. I mention this because the tribes' names might be
          used in your book.

          There are no other possible places in the USA that hot in
          summer but that get so little rain (none that I am aware of,
          at least).

          A seed supplier that might be of interest to you is Native
          Seeds/Search: http://www.nativeseeds.org/v2/default.php

          Pat
          --
          Gardening in northern Pennsylvania.

          Eat local food, change the world for the better!
        • von-fi@elonmerkki.net
          Greetings Lionel (and others too) I live in central-eastern Fennoscandia, on the finnish side of the russian border. In the south is baltic shield, in the east
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 5, 2006
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            Greetings Lionel (and others too)

            I live in central-eastern Fennoscandia, on the finnish side of the
            russian border. In the south is baltic shield, in the east karelia,
            in the north beyond arctic circle are the heritage lands of saami people
            and in the west is Scandinavia (including states of Sweden and Norway).

            This is western end of taiga and it's supposed to be summer now, but night
            temperatures drop down to +2 celsius degrees. The lowland blueberries are
            gone for this year and occasionally black currants too. Apples and cherries
            are currently in bloom, so I hope it won't drop below zero. Cedar pines are
            growing and so are the hazelnuts and japanese walnuts. I think we have
            around 160 plant species suitable for human consumption here and around 20
            species of edible mushrooms growing commonly wild. Picking wild foods is not
            restricted by laws. Some beautiful old growth boreal forests are still left
            from the industry and lots of lakes and springs... Winters are dark and
            freezing. Quite strange environment for tropical apes, but this is propably
            the area described as Hyperborea by ancient greeks.

            I'm happy to hear that link has helped you.

            regards,
            :) orava

            On Fri, May 26, 2006 at 10:53:52PM +0200, lionel campo wrote:
            > Good evening Orava,
            > many many thanks for the link !
            > Where're you from ?
            > Regards from France
            > Lionel
            >
            > Le 24 mai 06 à 18:34, von-fi@... a écrit :
            >
            > >Hello,
            > >
            > >can't say about this in first hand (I come from nearly arctic
            > >climate),
            > >but maybe this project would help:
            > >
            > >http://www.nativeseednetwork.org/
            > >
            > >:) orava
            > >
            > >
          • Geir Flatabø
            Do you get ripe Japanese Walnuts ?? Any named varieties ?? Geir Flatabø ... Do you get ripe Japanese Walnuts ?? Any named varieties ?? Geir Flatabø On
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 6, 2006
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              Do you get ripe Japanese Walnuts ??
              Any named varieties ??
               
              Geir Flatabø

               
              On 6/6/06, von-fi@... <von-fi@...> wrote:
              Greetings Lionel (and others too)

              I live in central-eastern Fennoscandia, on the finnish side of the
              russian border. In the south is baltic shield, in the east karelia,
              in the north beyond arctic circle are the heritage lands of saami people
              and in the  west is Scandinavia (including states of Sweden and Norway).

              This is western end of taiga and it's supposed to be summer now, but night
              temperatures drop down to +2 celsius degrees. The lowland blueberries are
              gone for this year and occasionally black currants too. Apples and cherries
              are currently in bloom, so I hope it won't drop below zero. Cedar pines are
              growing and so are the hazelnuts and japanese walnuts. I think we have
              around 160 plant species suitable for human consumption here and around 20
              species of edible mushrooms growing commonly wild. Picking wild foods is not
              restricted by laws. Some beautiful old growth boreal forests are still left
              from the industry and lots of lakes and springs...  Winters are dark and
              freezing. Quite strange environment for tropical apes, but this is propably
              the area described as Hyperborea by ancient greeks.

              I'm happy to hear that link has helped you.

              regards,
              :) orava

              On Fri, May 26, 2006 at 10:53:52PM +0200, lionel campo wrote:
              > Good evening Orava,
              > many many thanks for the link !
              > Where're you from ?
              > Regards from France
              > Lionel
              >
              > Le 24 mai 06 à 18:34, von-fi@... a écrit :
              >
              > >Hello,
              > >
              > >can't say about this in first hand (I come from nearly arctic
              > >climate),
              > >but maybe this project would help:
              > >
              > >http://www.nativeseednetwork.org/
              > >
              > >:) orava
              > >
              > >


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            • bslark@aol.com
              Dear All I have been on the list for sometime now and always enjoy keeping up to date by reading all the messages. My reason for contacting you all, is to ask
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 6, 2006
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                Dear All
                 
                I have been on the list for sometime now and always enjoy keeping up to date by reading all the messages.
                 
                My reason for contacting you all, is to ask if anyone on the list is either living in the Cardigan area of West Wales or is planning to visit the area over the summer period. I am involved in a charity set up to teach woodland and rural skills and we are currently building a shelter to provide covered teaching space during the winter months.We are looking for anyone interested in volunteering to help us do this.
                 
                The build is just about to start and will use mainly materials taken from the 17 acre woodland we work in. The wood is in the delightful villaige of Cilgerran just a couple of miles south of Cardigan and is nestled between the Castle and the Teifi river. There is accomodation in the villiage if anyone would like to visit us and as a bonus I would be delighted to bring any volunteers who may be interested to tour my own 4 acre forest garden which is just 4 years old but already producing an interesting variety of produce including my first crop of almonds.
                 
                Besides the woods we have a wildlife park right next door with hides to watch otters etc. and of course just a few minutes away are some fantastic beaches as well as the magnificent Pembrokeshire coastal path.
                 
                Anyone interested please contact me by email at: bslark@...
                 
                Thanks for reading and here's hopeing.
                 
                 
                Bruce
              • von-fi@elonmerkki.net
                Well yes. Both Juglans ailanthifolia and J. mandshurica thrive here, also J. cinerea, but these are not known to ripen seeds more north than city of Oulu or
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 16, 2006
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                  Well yes. Both Juglans ailanthifolia and J. mandshurica thrive here, also
                  J. cinerea, but these are not known to ripen seeds more north than city of Oulu
                  or Kajaani. I don't know any named varieties, since all of them seem to be seed
                  born. They don't yield every year, as it's with most of things around here, but
                  usually they do.

                  Over 50 year old ones are found in several older arboretums and their
                  seeds are propagated at local nurseries, not harvested at all or sold (in
                  case of Mustila arboretum, which is started around 1902 and was propably
                  source of walnuts for Tammisto arboretum also (another famous older arboretum
                  in Finland)) ... Even in the Linnanmäki-amusement park at Helsinki one can
                  get good harvest after the park is closed in autumn in some years, since those
                  are sometimes planted for decoration of public spaces.

                  ... My oldest plants are on their second year, so cannot say about them if
                  they will ever yield, but I grow them more every year.

                  thanks for you are,

                  orava :)

                  On Tue, Jun 06, 2006 at 01:03:38PM +0200, Geir Flatabø wrote:
                  > Do you get ripe Japanese Walnuts ??
                  > Any named varieties ??
                  >
                  > Geir Flatabø
                  >
                  >
                  > On 6/6/06, von-fi@... <von-fi@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >Greetings Lionel (and others too)
                  > >
                  > >I live in central-eastern Fennoscandia, on the finnish side of the
                  > >russian border. In the south is baltic shield, in the east karelia,
                  > >in the north beyond arctic circle are the heritage lands of saami people
                  > >and in the west is Scandinavia (including states of Sweden and Norway).
                  > >
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