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Re: question from archaeologists

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  • orftuk
    Hi Ces The first thing that comes to mind is traditional Celery - a.k.a. Trench Celery - which requires plenty of water and is usually grown in trenches for
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 22, 2002
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      Hi Ces

      The first thing that comes to mind is traditional Celery - a.k.a.
      Trench Celery - which requires plenty of water and is usually grown
      in trenches for this purpose, and so that the stems may be blanched
      by filling in the trench.

      The problem is that this vegetable was introduced to the UK about 300
      [?] years ago - how old is the trench/pit?

      It could be used as standard technique for growing any water
      demanding plant that needed occassional flooding, e.g. Watercress.
      Many native wetland plants have useful yields - Reedmace -[Typha] is
      very multi-functional, so is Common Reed - [Phragmites].

      More information on the age of the pit, its actual size, soil type,
      location etc might make it easier to whittle it down to the most
      likely species.

      Cheers Phil.


      --- In pfaf@y..., "Corner Plot Vegetables" <cesbeamish@2...> wrote:
      > I have been asked by an archaeologist what might have been grown on
      a fairly
      > large scale, in a large pit or trench that could be regularly
      flooded.
      > Any ideas please?
      > Thanks for your help
      >
      > Ces Beamish
      > Leicester
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