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shredded leaves

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  • Oscar Pena
    Hi All, I ve placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be a great
    Message 1 of 24 , Dec 20, 2005
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      Hi All,
       
      I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be  a great fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I see under the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also very wet (we are in the middle of the winter).
      My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last October. Hoping they will grow in spring.
       
      So my question is
      do you think it will be good for my garden?
      was my friend correct or not?
       
    • Now
      yes Oscar Pena wrote: Hi All, I ve placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as per recommendation from a
      Message 2 of 24 , Dec 21, 2005
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        yes

        Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:

        Hi All,
         
        I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be  a great fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I see under the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also very wet (we are in the middle of the winter).
        My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last October. Hoping they will grow in spring.
         
        So my question is
        do you think it will be good for my garden?
        was my friend correct or not?
         


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      • TradingPostPaul
        Don t think so. Leaves alone are a high carbon-low nitrogen material and need nitrogen-rich matter to decompose fully without robbing your soil of nitrogen
        Message 3 of 24 , Dec 21, 2005
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          Don't think so. Leaves alone are a high carbon-low nitrogen material and need nitrogen-rich matter to decompose fully without robbing your soil of nitrogen your plants need. Then it'll be good for the soil and good for the plants. There are several good sources you can use such as chicken manure, alfalfa meal, bone meal, blood meal etc. Personally I'd compost the mixture over the winter to preserve as much of the nutrients as possible, and then work it into the top six inches of the garden and mulch after that.

          paul, tradingpost@...
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Soilmakers/
          ---------------

          The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land organism. Only those who know the most about it can appreciate how little we know about it.
          - Aldo Leopold in Round River, 1933
          *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

          On 12/21/2005 at 4:48 PM Now wrote:

          >yes
          >
          >Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:
          >Hi All,
          >
          > I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as
          >per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be a great
          >fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I see under
          >the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also very wet
          >(we are in the middle of the winter).
          > My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last October.
          >Hoping they will grow in spring.
          >
          > So my question is
          > do you think it will be good for my garden?
          > was my friend correct or not?
          >
        • Oscar Pena
          Thanks for your answer. however I m getting different oppinions, yes and no! yes : very good to protect soil, save watter, and provide nutrients. no: Leaves
          Message 4 of 24 , Dec 22, 2005
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            Thanks for your answer. however I'm getting different oppinions, yes and no! 

            yes : very good to protect soil, save watter, and provide nutrients.

            no: Leaves alone do not work well because they are high in carbon and low in nitrogen, they will not decompose and they will not do good. solution add nitrogen rich materials to the leaves.

            my experience (not much I may add this is the first year I'm doing this and it is not over yet)

            I put shredded leaves about 4 to 6 inches thick, If I move the top layer of leaves they are very humid and they are getting very black thick material  my guess is that they are decomposing, however I added the leaves arround 1.5 month ago and I will not see the real effects in about 4 more month. I will add some nitrogen rich matterials to the leaves to make sure the leaves decompose in time for spring.

            any comments?

             

            Oscar

             



             


            From: "TradingPostPaul" <tradingpost@...>
            Reply-To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] shredded leaves
            Date: Wed, 21 Dec 2005 19:56:33 -0700


            Don't think so. Leaves alone are a high carbon-low nitrogen material and need nitrogen-rich matter to decompose fully without robbing your soil of nitrogen your plants need. Then it'll be good for the soil and good for the plants. There are several good sources you can use such as chicken manure, alfalfa meal, bone meal, blood meal etc. Personally I'd compost the mixture over the winter to preserve as much of the nutrients as possible, and then work it into the top six inches of the garden and mulch after that.

            paul, tradingpost@...
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Soilmakers/
            ---------------

            The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land organism. Only those who know the most about it can appreciate how little we know about it.
               - Aldo Leopold in  Round River, 1933
            *********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********

            On 12/21/2005 at 4:48 PM Now wrote:

            >yes
            >
            >Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:      
            >Hi All,
            >  
            >  I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as
            >per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be  a great
            >fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I see under
            >the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also very wet
            >(we are in the middle of the winter).
            >  My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last October.
            >Hoping they will grow in spring.
            >  
            >  So my question is
            >  do you think it will be good for my garden?
            >  was my friend correct or not?
            >  




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          • Griselda
            I have been reading about this recently. The advice given about using tree leaves seems to be that it is best to compost them separately from other material,
            Message 5 of 24 , Dec 22, 2005
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              Re: [pfaf] shredded leaves I have been reading about this recently.

              The advice given about using tree leaves seems to be that it is best to compost them separately from other material, because it takes at least 1 and maybe 2 years for them to break down.  They need nitrogen to decompose, so if you put them on the soil to rot down (maybe also using them as a mulch during that time), they will take nitrogen from the soil and thus other plants in that area would suffer from not enough nitrogen.  

              So, you can use the tree leaves to mulch areas where you don’t want anything else to grow – for instance to suppress weeds - or you can gather them into piles or put them into bags to rot down into what is then called ‘leaf mould’.     That is lovely dark crumbly sweet compost, and you can use it to mulch or to help enrich soils or to help with soil structure.  But you will have to wait 2 or 3 years for the leaf mould.  (I understand that one way to help the decomposition process is to pee on the leaves as that adds nitrogen).  :-)  

              griselda



              Thanks for your answer. however I'm getting different oppinions, yes and no!

              yes : very good to protect soil, save watter, and provide nutrients.

              no: Leaves alone do not work well because they are high in carbon and low in nitrogen, they will not decompose and they will not do good. solution add nitrogen rich materials to the leaves.

              my experience (not much I may add this is the first year I'm doing this and it is not over yet)

              I put shredded leaves about 4 to 6 inches thick, If I move the top layer of leaves they are very humid and they are getting very black thick material  my guess is that they are decomposing, however I added the leaves arround 1.5 month ago and I will not see the real effects in about 4 more month. I will add some nitrogen rich matterials to the leaves to make sure the leaves decompose in time for spring.

              any comments?

               

              Oscar

               



               

              From: "TradingPostPaul" <tradingpost@...>
              Reply-To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [pfaf] shredded leaves
              Date: Wed, 21 Dec 2005 19:56:33 -0700


              Don't think so. Leaves alone are a high carbon-low nitrogen material and need nitrogen-rich matter to decompose fully without robbing your soil of nitrogen your plants need. Then it'll be good for the soil and good for the plants. There are several good sources you can use such as chicken manure, alfalfa meal, bone meal, blood meal etc. Personally I'd compost the mixture over the winter to preserve as much of the nutrients as possible, and then work it into the top six inches of the garden and mulch after that.

              paul, tradingpost@...
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Soilmakers/
              ---------------

              The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land organism. Only those who know the most about it can appreciate how little we know about it.
                 - Aldo Leopold in  Round River, 1933
              *********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********

              On 12/21/2005 at 4:48 PM Now wrote:

              >yes
              >
              >Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:       
              >Hi All,
              >   
              >  I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as
              >per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be  a great
              >fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I see under
              >the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also very wet
              >(we are in the middle of the winter).
              >  My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last October.
              >Hoping they will grow in spring.
              >   
              >  So my question is
              >  do you think it will be good for my garden?
              >  was my friend correct or not?
              >   




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            • TradingPostPaul
              Or just start by shredding the leaves with the mower. Add nitrogen, and you get finished compost in weeks, under the proper conditions of moisture and warmth.
              Message 6 of 24 , Dec 22, 2005
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                Or just start by shredding the leaves with the mower. Add nitrogen, and you get finished compost in weeks, under the proper conditions of moisture and warmth.

                paul, tradingpost@...
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Soilmakers/
                ---------------
                The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land organism. Only those who know the most about it can appreciate how little we know about it.
                - Aldo Leopold in Round River, 1933
                *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********

                On 12/22/2005 at 6:02 PM Griselda wrote:

                >I have been reading about this recently.
                >
                >The advice given about using tree leaves seems to be that it is best to
                >compost them separately from other material, because it takes at least 1
                >and
                >maybe 2 years for them to break down. They need nitrogen to decompose, so
                >if you put them on the soil to rot down (maybe also using them as a mulch
                >during that time), they will take nitrogen from the soil and thus other
                >plants in that area would suffer from not enough nitrogen.
                >
                >So, you can use the tree leaves to mulch areas where you don¹t want
                >anything
                >else to grow ­ for instance to suppress weeds - or you can gather them into
                >piles or put them into bags to rot down into what is then called Œleaf
                >mould¹. That is lovely dark crumbly sweet compost, and you can use it
                >to
                >mulch or to help enrich soils or to help with soil structure. But you will
                >have to wait 2 or 3 years for the leaf mould. (I understand that one way
                >to
                >help the decomposition process is to pee on the leaves as that adds
                >nitrogen). :-)
                >
                >griselda
                >
                >
                >
                >> Thanks for your answer. however I'm getting different oppinions, yes and
                >no!
                >>
                >> yes : very good to protect soil, save watter, and provide nutrients.
                >>
                >> no: Leaves alone do not work well because they are high in carbon and
                >low in
                >> nitrogen, they will not decompose and they will not do good. solution add
                >> nitrogen rich materials to the leaves.
                >>
                >> my experience (not much I may add this is the first year I'm doing this
                >and it
                >> is not over yet)
                >>
                >> I put shredded leaves about 4 to 6 inches thick, If I move the top layer
                >of
                >> leaves they are very humid and they are getting very black thick
                >material my
                >> guess is that they are decomposing, however I added the leaves arround
                >1.5
                >> month ago and I will not see the real effects in about 4 more month. I
                >will
                >> add some nitrogen rich matterials to the leaves to make sure the leaves
                >> decompose in time for spring.
                >>
                >> any comments?
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> Oscar
                >>
              • Geir Flatabø
                If you add nitrogen rich material , you will disturb / suppress natural fungal and bacterial nitrogenfixing organisms, that have got lots of humus rich stuff
                Message 7 of 24 , Dec 22, 2005
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                  If you add nitrogen rich material , you will disturb / suppress natural
                  fungal and bacterial nitrogenfixing organisms, that have got lots of
                  humus rich stuff from you to work on !
                  What you do/ should do , depends on what you want to have / get.

                  Geir Flatabø

                  Oscar Pena skrev:

                  > Thanks for your answer. however I'm getting different oppinions, yes
                  > and no!
                  >
                  > yes : very good to protect soil, save watter, and provide nutrients.
                  >
                  > no: Leaves alone do not work well because they are high in carbon and
                  > low in nitrogen, they will not decompose and they will not do good.
                  > solution add nitrogen rich materials to the leaves.
                  >
                  > my experience (not much I may add this is the first year I'm doing
                  > this and it is not over yet)
                  >
                  > I put shredded leaves about 4 to 6 inches thick, If I move the top
                  > layer of leaves they are very humid and they are getting very black
                  > thick material my guess is that they are decomposing, however I added
                  > the leaves arround 1.5 month ago and I will not see the real effects
                  > in about 4 more month. I will add some nitrogen rich matterials to the
                  > leaves to make sure the leaves decompose in time for spring.
                  >
                  > any comments?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Oscar
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > From: /"TradingPostPaul" <tradingpost@...>/
                  > Reply-To: /pfaf@yahoogroups.com/
                  > To: /pfaf@yahoogroups.com/
                  > Subject: /Re: [pfaf] shredded leaves/
                  > Date: /Wed, 21 Dec 2005 19:56:33 -0700/
                  >
                  >
                  > Don't think so. Leaves alone are a high carbon-low nitrogen
                  > material and need nitrogen-rich matter to decompose fully without
                  > robbing your soil of nitrogen your plants need. Then it'll be good
                  > for the soil and good for the plants. There are several good
                  > sources you can use such as chicken manure, alfalfa meal, bone
                  > meal, blood meal etc. Personally I'd compost the mixture over the
                  > winter to preserve as much of the nutrients as possible, and then
                  > work it into the top six inches of the garden and mulch after that.
                  >
                  > paul, tradingpost@...
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Soilmakers/
                  > ---------------
                  >
                  > The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is
                  > not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land
                  > organism. Only those who know the most about it can appreciate how
                  > little we know about it.
                  > - Aldo Leopold in Round River, 1933
                  > *********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
                  >
                  > On 12/21/2005 at 4:48 PM Now wrote:
                  >
                  > >yes
                  > >
                  > >Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:
                  > >Hi All,
                  > >
                  > > I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden
                  > area as
                  > >per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be a
                  > great
                  > >fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I
                  > see under
                  > >the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also
                  > very wet
                  > >(we are in the middle of the winter).
                  > > My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last
                  > October.
                  > >Hoping they will grow in spring.
                  > >
                  > > So my question is
                  > > do you think it will be good for my garden?
                  > > was my friend correct or not?
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
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                • hannahminnea
                  My friends call me the Mulch Queen, because I go all over the neighborhood collecting bags of leaves from my neighbors. Mostly I have to shred them myself
                  Message 8 of 24 , Dec 22, 2005
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                    My friends call me the Mulch Queen, because I go all over the neighborhood collecting
                    bags of leaves from my neighbors. Mostly I have to shred them myself with my little
                    blower/shredder/vac.

                    I am way too lazy to compost, and around here it attracts the most unpleasant critters. I
                    have never had a problem with (existing) soil fertility using shredded leaves--they sit on
                    top of the soil. Whatever they may be "taking" from the soil is given back many times over
                    by virtue of the earthworm castings that I get from the layers of leaves.

                    I confess that I am a devotee' of Ruth Stout's method of deep mulching. There's virtually
                    no digging in her method--works for me! She does sprinkle a handful of cottonseed meal
                    over the mulch depending on what she is growing.

                    During the summer I add layers of grass clippings too. Sometimes I just have bins of
                    leaves and I get the boys to add a little natural "nitrogen" for me when nobody is looking!!
                    Happy Holidays,
                    Karen V.
                  • debi novice
                    Hi Oscar! I let all those who know me know that anytime they have a spare truckload of leaves, clippiings, tree trimminigs, or what-have-you, I m more than
                    Message 9 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                      Hi Oscar!

                      I let all those who know me know that anytime they
                      have a spare truckload of leaves, clippiings, tree
                      trimminigs, or what-have-you, I'm more than happy to
                      take it off their hands. Obviously, this does make to
                      times when I do, indeed, get a truckload of nothing
                      but leaves-just in time for mulching tenders.

                      I have never had a problem with loading those leaves
                      on there good and thick, not worrying about whether I
                      have the appropiate amount of "nitrogen" to get in
                      with them. The black you are seeing is just what you
                      think it is; those leaves are decomposing just fine.
                      You are doing the digestive organisms in your soil,
                      including your earthworms, a big favor by mulching
                      nice and thick; you are supplying more stable temps
                      for longer into the season for them to do their work,
                      along with giving them a nice snack to munch on.

                      It is true that carbon-heavy mulches do require more
                      nitrogen at first to assist their decomposition, but
                      one sees the affects of that much more in a growing
                      season application, and more with the woodier, more
                      dense carbon materials; it's not a big concern at
                      dormancy periods. There is plenty of time for the
                      increased need for nitrogen from the soil critters to
                      be balanced out by spring. Another 4 months until you
                      need to do anything with the mulch? No Worries! You
                      can already see the activity is fine, and as time goes
                      on you will see it working even better.

                      I beleive part of the "controversy" may come from the
                      individual poster's bent. If one is more concerned
                      with being sure the soil and it's critters has a
                      balanced diet with each admendment, they might be more
                      concerned about the carbon/nitrogen mix with each
                      addition to the garden. However, when one looks at the
                      success of, say, lasagne layering, cold compost piles,
                      and other types of soil additions that do not mix at
                      all, but simply lay things down as they become
                      available, one can pretty much figure out it's not
                      rocket science, nor is something one needs to worry
                      about unless they truly feel the need or desire to go
                      to that level.

                      There is mulching with leaves, straw, clippings, or
                      other materials individually and exclusively, done by
                      many folk, with no troubles.

                      I would direct you to read an article by Emelia
                      Hazelip, found here:
                      http://larryhaftl.com/ffo/faemilia.html

                      It is not quite specific to your leaves question, but
                      does give a great holistic view of the whats and
                      wherefores of organic matter in and on the soil.

                      I have not been able to catch up with all the posts on
                      this thread (or others, for that matter! <G>), so am
                      hoping this isn't redundant or otherwise useless.
                      deb

                      --- Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:


                      ---------------------------------

                      Thanks for your answer. however I'm getting different
                      oppinions, yes and no!

                      yes : very good to protect soil, save watter, and
                      provide nutrients.

                      no: Leaves alone do not work well because they are
                      high in carbon and low in nitrogen, they will not
                      decompose and they will not do good. solution add
                      nitrogen rich materials to the leaves.






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                    • Now
                      ....you don t need to waste energy shredding the leaves - the wild creators do that....yes this layer will kinda suppress growth underneath...but that s what
                      Message 10 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                        ....you don't need to waste energy shredding the leaves  - the wild creators do that....yes this layer will kinda suppress growth underneath...but that's what you want isn't it?......if you want leafmold the leaves must be broken down in a pile in the usual way...takes long time for leaves by the way...two years they say. I found a huge local council related leaf pile....lovely leafmold totally ideal for compost and potting., a year on its now cooled and riddled with couch grass.
                        I think this method would be better than the often advised mulch of scrap straw...unless that is, you are keen to see a new and super-vigorus strain of winter wheat introduced into your design anyway.
                         
                        Really a mulch should not take nutrient from what's there already, but it can't be helped if your putting down a mulch many times be it old cloths, cardboard or leaves...the soil should be able to handle this, or will do when it improves. Here in this garden in kent there is clay mostly of a very poor nutrient and humus level nature....but piling on various inprovers soon dramatically changes things...wood ash from Forestry Commision burnings...large amounts at the start of the growth rush at the start of summer, save urine, mix with wood ash in the barrel, again use during the growing season for super results...make sure it's rotted down, your suppost to dilute to taste somewhat....and rotten human shit is of course fantastic...usual to rare to use as a general mulch but excellent for digging in under new plants and on top of freshly planted stuff and a feed for older perenials and trees...its nice when you get this far...the system is then closed....and you are recycling everything...its a good meditation as well as practical thing...potential I think for lots of healing.
                         

                        yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
                        yes

                        Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:

                        Hi All,
                         
                        I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be  a great fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I see under the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also very wet (we are in the middle of the winter).
                        My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last October. Hoping they will grow in spring.
                         
                        So my question is
                        do you think it will be good for my garden?
                        was my friend correct or not?
                         


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                      • Now
                        ..one serious problem in the UK with mulching can be slugs...especially so in vegetable growing mulched senarios s...more specifically sheet mulching, I
                        Message 11 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                          ..one serious problem in the UK with mulching can be slugs...especially so in vegetable growing mulched senarios's...more specifically sheet mulching, I haven't really found a way around this because I refuse to kill them...they hide under the sheeting...not really a preoblem though with well established plants. I muclhed a veg area with old canvas tarpaulin last season...this suppressed weeds very well, and the soil looked good underneath, I cut holes to plant stuff into, but the slugs were immediately there, the magic I was on about last year...its a cresent moon goddess magic invocation garden somehow was working in reverese (attack the space rather than protection) ...so I just had to do what was possible and let it go.
                           
                          Its a big and serious question mulching and compost because this is central to any garden work...you need a good supply of compost to plant stuff into and you need to add fertility to a garden...or at least set up to be self supporting ideally.
                           
                          Blessings



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                        • Now
                          Quote: I found a huge local council related leaf pile....lovely leafmold totally ideal for compost and potting., a year on its now cooled and riddled with
                          Message 12 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                            Quote:
                             
                            "I found a huge local council related leaf pile....lovely leafmold totally ideal for compost and potting., a year on its now cooled and riddled with couch grass."
                             
                             
                            This pile was adjacant to a large allotment site, and the amazing thing was that it appeared that I was the only person to be skanking leafmold from this plie. (I asked the council contactors first)....perhaps this was because in order to access the pile one has to perform a 'abnormal behavour' type move of temporalily proping up the botton wire of a electric fence installed to stop deer, and ducking under this to bring sacks out.....This is England remember :~


                            Now <cromlech108@...> wrote:
                            ....you don't need to waste energy shredding the leaves  - the wild creators do that....yes this layer will kinda suppress growth underneath...but that's what you want isn't it?......if you want leafmold the leaves must be broken down in a pile in the usual way...takes long time for leaves by the way...two years they say. I found a huge local council related leaf pile....lovely leafmold totally ideal for compost and potting., a year on its now cooled and riddled with couch grass.
                            I think this method would be better than the often advised mulch of scrap straw...unless that is, you are keen to see a new and super-vigorus strain of winter wheat introduced into your design anyway.
                             
                            Really a mulch should not take nutrient from what's there already, but it can't be helped if your putting down a mulch many times be it old cloths, cardboard or leaves...the soil should be able to handle this, or will do when it improves. Here in this garden in kent there is clay mostly of a very poor nutrient and humus level nature....but piling on various inprovers soon dramatically changes things...wood ash from Forestry Commision burnings...large amounts at the start of the growth rush at the start of summer, save urine, mix with wood ash in the barrel, again use during the growing season for super results...make sure it's rotted down, your suppost to dilute to taste somewhat....and rotten human shit is of course fantastic...usual to rare to use as a general mulch but excellent for digging in under new plants and on top of freshly planted stuff and a feed for older perenials and trees...its nice when you get this far...the system is then closed....and you are recycling everything...its a good meditation as well as practical thing...potential I think for lots of healing.
                             

                            yahoo.co.uk> wrote:
                            yes

                            Oscar Pena <troya_1970@...> wrote:

                            Hi All,
                             
                            I've placed about 3 to 4 inches of shredded leaves in my garden area as per recommendation from a friend, he told me that they will be  a great fertilizer and also will prevent unwanted weeds to grow. When I see under the leaves they look that they are very dark and decomposing also very wet (we are in the middle of the winter).
                            My garden is a new garden and I planted al perennial bulbs last October. Hoping they will grow in spring.
                             
                            So my question is
                            do you think it will be good for my garden?
                            was my friend correct or not?
                             


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                          • Griselda
                            Slugs....night-time beasties....can be found and picked up after dusk and carried elsewhere if you don¹t want to kill them, or frogs from a pond can have a go
                            Message 13 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                              Re: [pfaf] shredded leaves Slugs....night-time beasties....can be found and picked up after dusk and carried elsewhere if you don’t want to kill them, or frogs from a pond can have a go at them, as can a few chickens wandering round as the evening arrives. But it depends on what scale you are talking about, and how squeamish you are I suppose. I take my slugs outside to the roadway and leave them on some old leaves or grass. They have a bit of journey to find their way back. I do the same with snails too.

                              ..one serious problem in the UK with mulching can be slugs...especially so in vegetable growing mulched senarios's...more specifically sheet mulching, I haven't really found a way around this because I refuse to kill them...they hide under the sheeting...not really a preoblem though with well established plants. I muclhed a veg area with old canvas tarpaulin last season...this suppressed weeds very well, and the soil looked good underneath, I cut holes to plant stuff into, but the slugs were immediately there, the magic I was on about last year...its a cresent moon goddess magic invocation garden somehow was working in reverese (attack the space rather than protection) ...so I just had to do what was possible and let it go.
                                
                               
                                
                              Its a big and serious question mulching and compost because this is central to any garden work...you need a good supply of compost to plant stuff into and you need to add fertility to a garden...or at least set up to be self supporting ideally.
                                
                               
                                
                              Blessings




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                            • allmendeperma@web.de
                              pfaf@yahoogroups.com schrieb am 23.12.05 14:14:10: ... Really a mulch should not take nutrient from what s there already, but it can t be helped ... Well,
                              Message 14 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                                pfaf@yahoogroups.com schrieb am 23.12.05 14:14:10:
                                "... Really a mulch should not take nutrient from what's there already, but it can't be helped ..."

                                Well, I have another book here from Burkhard Kayser "Mulch und Untersaaten" from 1998 that says on page 55 (attempt of translation):"At the beginning of a mulch-system there can be under circumstances a temporary fixation of nitrogen from the soil. This N is used by the microorganisms to built down materials with much more carbon than N (e.g. straw, sawdust). This N is available to the plants later on, so it isn´t lost. To solve the temporary problem there are the following possibilities...."

                                For more Information about the book. www.mulchinfo.de

                                Greetngs from Klaus

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                              • Geir Flatabø
                                In fact, you may expect the Nitrogen fixation ( from the soil) as a way to lessen the loss of Nitrogen, that then will be liberated later on ( perhaps in
                                Message 15 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                                  In fact,
                                  you may expect the Nitrogen fixation ( from the soil) as a way to
                                  lessen the loss of Nitrogen,
                                  that then will be liberated later on ( perhaps in growing season).

                                  Geir Flatabø

                                  allmendeperma@... skrev:

                                  >pfaf@yahoogroups.com schrieb am 23.12.05 14:14:10:
                                  >"... Really a mulch should not take nutrient from what's there already, but it can't be helped ..."
                                  >
                                  >Well, I have another book here from Burkhard Kayser "Mulch und Untersaaten" from 1998 that says on page 55 (attempt of translation):"At the beginning of a mulch-system there can be under circumstances a temporary fixation of nitrogen from the soil. This N is used by the microorganisms to built down materials with much more carbon than N (e.g. straw, sawdust). This N is available to the plants later on, so it isn´t lost. To solve the temporary problem there are the following possibilities...."
                                  >
                                  >For more Information about the book. www.mulchinfo.de
                                  >
                                  >Greetngs from Klaus
                                  >
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                                • Now
                                  haha no sorry...I wont start playing games with negative karma! Griselda wrote: Slugs....night-time beasties....can be found and
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                                    haha no sorry...I wont start playing games with negative karma!
                                     


                                    Griselda <griselda1@...> wrote:
                                    Slugs....night-time beasties....can be found and picked up after dusk and carried elsewhere if you don’t want to kill them, or frogs from a pond can have a go at them, as can a few chickens wandering round as the evening arrives. But it depends on what scale you are talking about, and how squeamish you are I suppose. I take my slugs outside to the roadway and leave them on some old leaves or grass. They have a bit of journey to find their way back. I do the same with snails too.

                                    ..one serious problem in the UK with mulching can be slugs...especially so in vegetable growing mulched senarios's...more specifically sheet mulching, I haven't really found a way around this because I refuse to kill them...they hide under the sheeting...not really a preoblem though with well established plants. I muclhed a veg area with old canvas tarpaulin last season...this suppressed weeds very well, and the soil looked good underneath, I cut holes to plant stuff into, but the slugs were immediately there, the magic I was on about last year...its a cresent moon goddess magic invocation garden somehow was working in reverese (attack the space rather than protection) ...so I just had to do what was possible and let it go.
                                      
                                     
                                      
                                    Its a big and serious question mulching and compost because this is central to any garden work...you need a good supply of compost to plant stuff into and you need to add fertility to a garden...or at least set up to be self supporting ideally.
                                      
                                     
                                      
                                    Blessings




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                                  • Now
                                    ...sorry that should have read if it can t be helped. I love slugs really! Gorgious wee brown bods like Tings back was! ...Ting was my dogfriend....you d be
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Dec 23, 2005
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                                      ...sorry that should have read "if it can't be helped." I love slugs really! Gorgious wee brown bods like Tings back was! ...Ting was my dogfriend....you'd be amazed at how stuff gets into the reality like and screws up the krisja's garden possibility...thats life mate thats reatity for you, even rejoicing in it...anyway seemed scary all you monsters!
                                       
                                      PROTECTION!
                                       
                                      JAH LOVE!

                                      allmendeperma@... wrote:


                                      pfaf@yahoogroups.com schrieb am 23.12.05 14:14:10:
                                      "...   Really a mulch should not take nutrient from what's there already, but it can't be helped ..."

                                      Well, I have another book here from Burkhard Kayser "Mulch und Untersaaten" from 1998 that says on page 55 (attempt of translation):"At the beginning of a mulch-system there can be under circumstances a temporary fixation of nitrogen from the soil. This N is used by the microorganisms to built down materials with much more carbon than N (e.g. straw, sawdust). This N is available to the plants later on, so it isn´t lost. To solve the temporary problem there are the following possibilities...."

                                      For more Information about the book. www.mulchinfo.de

                                      Greetngs from Klaus

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                                    • Now
                                      ...the real one not the masonic blag! http://nw23.fdread.org/ ...check out some real peace convoy acid! (ahhch!, if only the actual free outdoor party was so
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Dec 24, 2005
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        ...the real one not the masonic blag!
                                         
                                         
                                        ...check out some real peace convoy acid!
                                         
                                        (ahhch!, if only the actual free outdoor party was so easy to find at this point in time)
                                         
                                        Blessssssssssssssssssssssssssssssiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnggggggggggggggggggggggssssssssssssssssssss

                                        Now <cromlech108@...> wrote:
                                        haha no sorry...I wont start playing games with negative karma!
                                         


                                        Griselda <griselda1@...> wrote:
                                        Slugs....night-time beasties....can be found and picked up after dusk and carried elsewhere if you don’t want to kill them, or frogs from a pond can have a go at them, as can a few chickens wandering round as the evening arrives. But it depends on what scale you are talking about, and how squeamish you are I suppose. I take my slugs outside to the roadway and leave them on some old leaves or grass. They have a bit of journey to find their way back. I do the same with snails too.

                                        ..one serious problem in the UK with mulching can be slugs...especially so in vegetable growing mulched senarios's...more specifically sheet mulching, I haven't really found a way around this because I refuse to kill them...they hide under the sheeting...not really a preoblem though with well established plants. I muclhed a veg area with old canvas tarpaulin last season...this suppressed weeds very well, and the soil looked good underneath, I cut holes to plant stuff into, but the slugs were immediately there, the magic I was on about last year...its a cresent moon goddess magic invocation garden somehow was working in reverese (attack the space rather than protection) ...so I just had to do what was possible and let it go.
                                          
                                         
                                          
                                        Its a big and serious question mulching and compost because this is central to any garden work...you need a good supply of compost to plant stuff into and you need to add fertility to a garden...or at least set up to be self supporting ideally.
                                          
                                         
                                          
                                        Blessings




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                                      • Shirley
                                        Yesterday, Christmas eve.... we collected 330 bare rooted native trees - a mixture of 60 purple osier, 60 common osier and 20 grey sallow - the osier we hope
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Dec 25, 2005
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                                          Yesterday, Christmas eve.... we collected 330 bare rooted native trees - a mixture of 60 purple osier, 60 common osier and 20 grey sallow - the osier we hope to make a living fence from and also to create some baskets/willow sculpture and possibly even fuel at some stage; 10 rowan which we will grow as trees; 30 hazel, and 30 each of guelder rose, dog rose, burnet rose, hawthorn, blackthorn from which we want to make a mixed native hedge.
                                           
                                          I've been looking at buying/obtaining some tree shelters. We live in North East Scotland and the hedging will be fairly exposed. The saplings are all native and locally grown. We have a few visiting sheep (living lawnmowers), not to mention rabbits, hares, deer etc. What is the cheapest way to protect the plantings? All suggestions gratefully received. Do I actually need to protect ALL the trees - looking at one willow site it appears that for the 'fedge' I don't need to provide individual plant protection, other than matting or other form of weed prevention.
                                           
                                          Look foward to reading your replies.
                                           
                                          Shirlz xx
                                           
                                           

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                                        • John Marshall
                                          We have a rabbit problem here but none of our willows have suffered despite being unprotected. Other trees are affected in a small way but usually only for a
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Dec 26, 2005
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            We have a rabbit problem here but none of our willows have suffered despite
                                            being unprotected. Other trees are affected in a small way but usually only
                                            for a short period. We have used spiral guards where the problem has started
                                            to worry us.
                                            John Marshall

                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com]
                                            Sent: 26 December 2005 22:19
                                            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: [pfaf] Digest Number 536

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                                            There is 1 message in this issue.

                                            Topics in this digest:

                                            1. Planting trees
                                            From: "Shirley" <shirley.k@...>


                                            ________________________________________________________________________
                                            ________________________________________________________________________

                                            Message: 1
                                            Date: Sun, 25 Dec 2005 22:01:54 -0000
                                            From: "Shirley" <shirley.k@...>
                                            Subject: Planting trees

                                            Yesterday, Christmas eve.... we collected 330 bare rooted native trees - a
                                            mixture of 60 purple osier, 60 common osier and 20 grey sallow - the osier
                                            we hope to make a living fence from and also to create some baskets/willow
                                            sculpture and possibly even fuel at some stage; 10 rowan which we will grow
                                            as trees; 30 hazel, and 30 each of guelder rose, dog rose, burnet rose,
                                            hawthorn, blackthorn from which we want to make a mixed native hedge.

                                            I've been looking at buying/obtaining some tree shelters. We live in North
                                            East Scotland and the hedging will be fairly exposed. The saplings are all
                                            native and locally grown. We have a few visiting sheep (living lawnmowers),
                                            not to mention rabbits, hares, deer etc. What is the cheapest way to protect
                                            the plantings? All suggestions gratefully received. Do I actually need to
                                            protect ALL the trees - looking at one willow site it appears that for the
                                            'fedge' I don't need to provide individual plant protection, other than
                                            matting or other form of weed prevention.

                                            Look foward to reading your replies.

                                            Shirlz xx



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                                            Checked by AVG Free Edition.
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                                          • allmendeperma@web.de
                                            Hi Shirley & everybody! Me, too, would be interested more in alternative methods for the protection of new plantigs, but the only thing I´ve experiences with
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Dec 27, 2005
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Hi Shirley & everybody!
                                              Me, too, would be interested more in alternative methods for the protection of new plantigs, but the only thing I´ve experiences with is a fence.
                                              I´ve heard about human manure - it shell scare deer etc. (and even neighbours and walkers I suppose) and another thing I´ve heard of were tethers, soaked with loam winded around the trunks (but I´m afraid there are not only trunks up to the height where the deers are nibbling - ours do it up to about 120cm). In the 90th I´ve seen a plantation where the trunks where brushed with a mixture of durex and sand because of sheep.

                                              Back to the fence: People here protect their hedge-plantings with fence with knittings about 10x10cm, the lowest part (up to 50cm hight) 10x5cm. It has to be 180cm high and additional 10-20cm are folded to the outside over the ground to make some digging-protection.
                                              Only the wire costs 500Euros per Kilometer. Stakes you might get for free if you ask some lokal foresters and cut them yourself out of a forest of young larches (this stakes should last for about 5 years and that should be enough for the hedge to get out of the critical age).
                                              Stakes of splitted oak should last much longer, but as the heartwood is essential they`re from big trees and you`ll have to pay for it.

                                              After building the fence around our garden we planted wild birch-seedlings of 5-100cm height between each two stakes and plaited them each year through the knittings. After 5 years they should be able to carry the wire.

                                              Greetings from Klaus

                                              pfaf@yahoogroups.com schrieb am 25.12.05 23:01:37:
                                              Yesterday, Christmas eve.... we collected 330 bare rooted native trees - a mixture of 60 purple osier, 60 common osier and 20 grey sallow - the osier we hope to make a living fence from and also to create some baskets/willow sculpture and possibly even fuel at some stage; 10 rowan which we will grow as trees; 30 hazel, and 30 each of guelder rose, dog rose, burnet rose, hawthorn, blackthorn from which we want to make a mixed native hedge. I've been looking at buying/obtaining some tree shelters. We live in North East Scotland and the hedging will be fairly exposed. The saplings are all native and locally grown. We have a few visiting sheep (living lawnmowers), not to mention rabbits, hares, deer etc. What is the cheapest way to protect the plantings? All suggestions gratefully received. Do I actually need to protect ALL the trees - looking at one willow site it appears that for the 'fedge' I don't need to provide individual plant protection, other than matting or other form of weed prevention. Look foward to reading your replies. Shirlz xx

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                                            • Geir Flatabø
                                              Much used in Norway is perfume, used by hanging up one piece of cheap small soap (in its package to protect against rain, -) in each tree you want protected,
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Dec 27, 2005
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                                                Much used in Norway is perfume, used by
                                                hanging up one piece of cheap small soap (in its package to protect
                                                against rain, -) in each tree you want protected,
                                                it have some protective effect at least against roe deer,
                                                not so good against the larger elk and deer...
                                                If fences are used, often electrical fences are preferred,
                                                when the animals haved learned they are electric, they keep away for
                                                some time....
                                                Also are used bone and blood mixture, that also have some manure effect,
                                                but have limited lasting effect, and have to be regularely renewed.

                                                Geir Flatabø

                                                allmendeperma@... skrev:

                                                >Hi Shirley & everybody!
                                                >Me, too, would be interested more in alternative methods for the protection of new plantigs, but the only thing I´ve experiences with is a fence.
                                                >I´ve heard about human manure - it shell scare deer etc. (and even neighbours and walkers I suppose) and another thing I´ve heard of were tethers, soaked with loam winded around the trunks (but I´m afraid there are not only trunks up to the height where the deers are nibbling - ours do it up to about 120cm). In the 90th I´ve seen a plantation where the trunks where brushed with a mixture of durex and sand because of sheep.
                                                >
                                                >Back to the fence: People here protect their hedge-plantings with fence with knittings about 10x10cm, the lowest part (up to 50cm hight) 10x5cm. It has to be 180cm high and additional 10-20cm are folded to the outside over the ground to make some digging-protection.
                                                >Only the wire costs 500Euros per Kilometer. Stakes you might get for free if you ask some lokal foresters and cut them yourself out of a forest of young larches (this stakes should last for about 5 years and that should be enough for the hedge to get out of the critical age).
                                                >Stakes of splitted oak should last much longer, but as the heartwood is essential they`re from big trees and you`ll have to pay for it.
                                                >
                                                >After building the fence around our garden we planted wild birch-seedlings of 5-100cm height between each two stakes and plaited them each year through the knittings. After 5 years they should be able to carry the wire.
                                                >
                                                >Greetings from Klaus
                                                >
                                                >pfaf@yahoogroups.com schrieb am 25.12.05 23:01:37:
                                                > Yesterday, Christmas eve.... we collected 330 bare rooted native trees - a mixture of 60 purple osier, 60 common osier and 20 grey sallow - the osier we hope to make a living fence from and also to create some baskets/willow sculpture and possibly even fuel at some stage; 10 rowan which we will grow as trees; 30 hazel, and 30 each of guelder rose, dog rose, burnet rose, hawthorn, blackthorn from which we want to make a mixed native hedge. I've been looking at buying/obtaining some tree shelters. We live in North East Scotland and the hedging will be fairly exposed. The saplings are all native and locally grown. We have a few visiting sheep (living lawnmowers), not to mention rabbits, hares, deer etc. What is the cheapest way to protect the plantings? All suggestions gratefully received. Do I actually need to protect ALL the trees - looking at one willow site it appears that for the 'fedge' I don't need to provide individual plant protection, other than matting or other form of weed prevention. Look foward to reading your replies. Shirlz xx
                                                >
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                                              • orftuk
                                                The cheapest way to deal with rabbit / tree relations is to do nothing. I run a tree nursery with rabbits. They are fond of biting off thin saplings at about
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Jan 2, 2006
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  The cheapest way to deal with rabbit / tree relations is to do nothing.

                                                  I run a tree nursery with rabbits.

                                                  They are fond of biting off thin saplings at about 5cm aove ground but
                                                  i think this isnt for food, more of a 'tooth exercise', as they just
                                                  leave the tops where they fall.The numbers of trees affected are small
                                                  enough to ignore. They showed most interest in straight, tall 2 year
                                                  old saplings like Aspen and Robinia. Sometimes this works for me as
                                                  they help make some young plants bush out, e.g. Chaeomeles, and
                                                  saplings destined for hedging.

                                                  The worst trouble with them I have is when roots are exposed - they
                                                  will leave tree roots looking like well chewed corn on the cob husks.

                                                  So I'd say plant slightly deep so they arent tempted and cant pull
                                                  them up, and dont leave any bare-rooted plants accessible to them.

                                                  If you have heeled-in plants cover above the root area with a board or
                                                  slabs or something they cant move.

                                                  The thing to remember is rabbits, trees and sites are different
                                                  wherever you go, so develop solutions from what you can see happening
                                                  on your plot, and Good Luck!

                                                  --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "John Marshall" <john@g...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > We have a rabbit problem here but none of our willows have suffered
                                                  despite
                                                  > being unprotected. Other trees are affected in a small way but
                                                  usually only
                                                  > for a short period. We have used spiral guards where the problem has
                                                  started
                                                  > to worry us.
                                                  > John Marshall
                                                  >
                                                  > -----Original Message-----
                                                  > From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com]
                                                  > Sent: 26 December 2005 22:19
                                                  > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                                  > Subject: [pfaf] Digest Number 536
                                                  >
                                                  > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                                                  --------------------~--> Need
                                                  > Help? Get Help! Tools and Strategies for Healthy Drug-Free Living</a>.
                                                  > http://us.click.yahoo.com/PhcW9C/dbOLAA/a8ILAA/bAOolB/TM
                                                  > --------------------------------------------------------------------~->
                                                  >
                                                  > There is 1 message in this issue.
                                                  >
                                                  > Topics in this digest:
                                                  >
                                                  > 1. Planting trees
                                                  > From: "Shirley" <shirley.k@b...>
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > ________________________________________________________________________
                                                  > ________________________________________________________________________
                                                  >
                                                  > Message: 1
                                                  > Date: Sun, 25 Dec 2005 22:01:54 -0000
                                                  > From: "Shirley" <shirley.k@b...>
                                                  > Subject: Planting trees
                                                  >
                                                  > Yesterday, Christmas eve.... we collected 330 bare rooted native
                                                  trees - a
                                                  > mixture of 60 purple osier, 60 common osier and 20 grey sallow - the
                                                  osier
                                                  > we hope to make a living fence from and also to create some
                                                  baskets/willow
                                                  > sculpture and possibly even fuel at some stage; 10 rowan which we
                                                  will grow
                                                  > as trees; 30 hazel, and 30 each of guelder rose, dog rose, burnet rose,
                                                  > hawthorn, blackthorn from which we want to make a mixed native hedge.
                                                  >
                                                  > I've been looking at buying/obtaining some tree shelters. We live in
                                                  North
                                                  > East Scotland and the hedging will be fairly exposed. The saplings
                                                  are all
                                                  > native and locally grown. We have a few visiting sheep (living
                                                  lawnmowers),
                                                  > not to mention rabbits, hares, deer etc. What is the cheapest way to
                                                  protect
                                                  > the plantings? All suggestions gratefully received. Do I actually
                                                  need to
                                                  > protect ALL the trees - looking at one willow site it appears that
                                                  for the
                                                  > 'fedge' I don't need to provide individual plant protection, other than
                                                  > matting or other form of weed prevention.
                                                  >
                                                  > Look foward to reading your replies.
                                                  >
                                                  > Shirlz xx
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > --
                                                  > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                                                  > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                                  > Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database: 267.14.7/214 - Release Date:
                                                  23/12/2005
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > [This message contained attachments]
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                                                • Now
                                                  This is such sanity in a mainstream world of tree wrapping obsession...due primarily I think to the magic of the market ...great Medicine huh? Here s some
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Jan 18, 2006
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    This is such sanity in a mainstream world of tree wrapping obsession...due primarily I think to the 'magic of the market'...great Medicine huh?
                                                     
                                                    Here's some antidote:
                                                     
                                                     
                                                    Om

                                                    orftuk <orftuk@...> wrote:
                                                    The cheapest way to deal with rabbit / tree relations is to do nothing.

                                                    I run a tree nursery with rabbits.

                                                    They are fond of biting off thin saplings at about 5cm aove ground but
                                                    i think this isnt for food, more of a 'tooth exercise', as they just
                                                    leave the tops where they fall.The numbers of trees affected are small
                                                    enough to ignore. They showed most interest in straight, tall 2 year
                                                    old saplings like Aspen and Robinia. Sometimes this works for me as
                                                    they help make some young plants bush out, e.g. Chaeomeles, and
                                                    saplings destined for hedging.

                                                    The worst trouble with them I have is when roots are exposed - they
                                                    will leave tree roots looking like well chewed corn on the cob husks.

                                                    So I'd say plant slightly deep so they arent tempted and cant pull
                                                    them up, and dont leave any bare-rooted plants accessible to them.

                                                    If you have heeled-in plants cover above the root area with a board or
                                                    slabs or something they cant move.

                                                    The thing to remember is rabbits, trees and sites are different
                                                    wherever you go, so develop solutions from what you can see happening
                                                    on your plot, and Good Luck!

                                                    --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "John Marshall" <john@g...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    >  We have a rabbit problem here but none of our willows have suffered
                                                    despite
                                                    > being unprotected. Other trees are affected in a small way but
                                                    usually only
                                                    > for a short period. We have used spiral guards where the problem has
                                                    started
                                                    > to worry us.
                                                    > John Marshall
                                                    >
                                                    > -----Original Message-----
                                                    > From: pfaf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pfaf@yahoogroups.com]
                                                    > Sent: 26 December 2005 22:19
                                                    > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                                                    > Subject: [pfaf] Digest Number 536
                                                    >
                                                    > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                                                    --------------------~--> Need
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                                                    > There is 1 message in this issue.
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                                                    > Topics in this digest:
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                                                    >       1. Planting trees
                                                    >            From: "Shirley" <shirley.k@b...>
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > ________________________________________________________________________
                                                    > ________________________________________________________________________
                                                    >
                                                    > Message: 1        
                                                    >    Date: Sun, 25 Dec 2005 22:01:54 -0000
                                                    >    From: "Shirley" <shirley.k@b...>
                                                    > Subject: Planting trees
                                                    >
                                                    > Yesterday, Christmas eve.... we collected 330 bare rooted native
                                                    trees - a
                                                    > mixture of 60 purple osier, 60 common osier and 20 grey sallow - the
                                                    osier
                                                    > we hope to make a living fence from and also to create some
                                                    baskets/willow
                                                    > sculpture and possibly even fuel at some stage; 10 rowan which we
                                                    will grow
                                                    > as trees; 30 hazel, and 30 each of guelder rose, dog rose, burnet rose,
                                                    > hawthorn, blackthorn from which we want to make a mixed native hedge.

                                                    > I've been looking at buying/obtaining some tree shelters. We live in
                                                    North
                                                    > East Scotland and the hedging will be fairly exposed. The saplings
                                                    are all
                                                    > native and locally grown. We have a few visiting sheep (living
                                                    lawnmowers),
                                                    > not to mention rabbits, hares, deer etc. What is the cheapest way to
                                                    protect
                                                    > the plantings? All suggestions gratefully received. Do I actually
                                                    need to
                                                    > protect ALL the trees - looking at one willow site it appears that
                                                    for the
                                                    > 'fedge' I don't need to provide individual plant protection, other than
                                                    > matting or other form of weed prevention.

                                                    > Look foward to reading your replies.

                                                    > Shirlz xx


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