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878Re: [pfaf] Re: [PermacultureWoodlands] WHY WE NEED WILD LAND

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  • Andy Reed
    Jan 1, 1997
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      Does anybody know anyone with investments interest in a sustainable wild berry business that encourages economic development for rural aboriginal first nations peoples?  I have it all just waiting to proceed, the community, willing bodies, etc.  It would be a dream come true.
      Andrew Reed, B.S.
      "there is no way to peace, peace is the way"
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2005 1:14 PM
      Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: [PermacultureWoodlands] WHY WE NEED WILD LAND

      In the Willamette River valley where I live, many berries grow well.  We grow native blackberries, salal, salmon berries and huckleberries, and have added raspberries, blueberries, cranberries.  We grow some lingonberries-that I think come from your region, as well as boysenberries, currants, gooseberries. 
      We actually have a huge problem with non-native blackberries being invasive and causing erosion and removing diversity around water bodies-it is just one of the things affecting our loss of salmon habitat. 
      But back to what grows: apples, figs, peaches, plums, cherries, some nuts, like walnuts and filberts, and much more.  Even some of the hardier citrus will grow here.  This is a very fertile area with a mild climate.  A nursery that specializes in unusual edibles nearby may help illustrate what we can grow.   
      Here is the nursery's interesting website:  http://www.onegreenworld.com/
      Another similar and terrific nursery north of us in the state of Washington is  http://www.raintreenursery.com/
      Hope you find this interesting,
      Diana
       
      Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:
      WHat kind of wild berries / fruits do you get / pick,
      oregon is from natures side very rich in species compared to Norway /
      Scandianvia...

      Geir Flatabø

      Diana Santry skrev:

      >We have a pretty good attitude about wildness here in
      >Portland, Oregon, US, still I live in a 'tidy'
      >neighborhood.  I don't have much more than a little
      >city lot, but it's teeming with berries and fruit and
      >weeds! that the pollinators love!  My neighbors don't
      >know much of what to think, because it certainly
      >doesn't fit in, but its gorgeous! and me and the kids
      >can eat berries if we beat the birds and life is here!
      > I hope this takes over the town.  Feels so good!
      >Congratulations to all of us humans allowing our earth
      >to recover in Texas and in Australia and all over this
      >world! We don't need to control everything! Thanks for
      >this posting. My heart feels better hearing about
      >people with a future in mind!
      >Diana
      >
      >--- Martin Naylor <martinwnaylor@...> wrote:
      >

      >
      >>hi
      >>thats so wonderfull, over here in australia we have
      >>a tidy towns competition, bill mollison whant's it
      >>changed to an untidy town's competition, at least
      >>you know that your eyes don't lie, don't fear there
      >>are many along the line who know not what any of it
      >>is worth,
      >>martin
      >>
      >>"Gloria C. Baikauskas" <gcb49@...> wrote:
      >>I wish I had a camera...and had had a camera...to
      >>show you what has
      >>happened to my own 3 acres in NCentral Texas in the
      >>8 years we have
      >>lived here.  I don't mow it..well most of it. 
      >>
      >>It is also regenerating.  Each year I see new weeds
      >>replace the
      >>varieties that were there the year before..and
      >>sometimes longer. 
      >>Birds, or other critters, have planted trees for us
      >>that have grown
      >>so quickly it is hard to believe after dealing with
      >>transplanted
      >>trees from nurseries all of my life.  One hackberry
      >>tree was as tall
      >>as the house (sits on the other side of the driveway
      >>from it) after 3
      >>years! 
      >>
      >>Wildflowers also seem to change out.  It has been so
      >>interesting to
      >>watch, though I suspect the neighbors think I am
      >>eccentric, to say
      >>the least, and crazy maybe more often. 
      >>
      >>I have tried to explain it to them...and watched
      >>them roll their eyes
      >>too often. 
      >>
      >>When we moved here this was basically dead soil.  It
      >>had been
      >>chemically farmed for as long as anyone remembered.
      >>I used to get
      >>rashes all over me when I tried working in the
      >>soil...and my dogs
      >>lost hair from laying on it. 
      >>
      >>It has taught me so much more than I could ever
      >>learn in a book, even
      >>if it looks like no gardener lives here at all.
      >>
      >>Gloria, Texas USA
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
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