Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

5527Re: [pfaf] food

Expand Messages
  • Michael Porter
    Apr 28, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      A look at the diets of the cultures around the world who live the longest life span, and have the least health problems, --tells us "what humans are supposed to Eat"  or should eat if we would like to have a long healthy life, --none of those peoples eat much meat, and none of them eat no meat, --  but as mentioned above, --a broad base of plant nutrition is an important part of these peoples diet . 
          Most of the Animals I am familiar with [the ones I have raised, or hunted]  have a broad base of nutrition, -- even the Coyote, [that I have spent time trapping] has an amazingly broad base of foods [mostly plants] that they eat. Even my cow if given her choice will eat lots of different plants, not just grass.

      --- On Wed, 4/27/11, Matthew Sleigh <matthew@...> wrote:

      From: Matthew Sleigh <matthew@...>
      Subject: Re: [pfaf] food
      To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2011, 7:39 PM

       
      A majority of humans have very restricted diets, however humankind has
      a very wide diet - if just the staple plant Families are looked at we
      have: Gramineae (rice, wheat, maize), Araceae (taro), Euphorbiaceae
      (cassava), Solanaceae (potatoes), Arecaceae (sago), Moraceae
      (breadfruit), Musaceae (plantain), Amaranthaceae (amaranth,
      goosefoot), Fabaceae (soy), Cannaceae (canna), Marantaceae (arrowroot)
      . . .

      Most of the staples are (or have been) the mainstay of their culture,
      sometimes to the extent that specific maladies caused by deficiency
      are associated with several. Most cultures which rely strongly on one
      staple have developed cooking techniques or use admixture plants that
      alter the chemical structure of the staple or add the missing
      nutrients - when these staples have been relied on outside of their
      home range disasters have occurred.

      There are still a huge number of people subsisting on single staples,
      with the absolute minimum of potherbs, salt or "stock" for survival.
      In times of famine, the demand for staples has been shown to increase;
      as less variety of food becomes available, more people need more of
      the staples.

      Most people, who rely on a staple for day to day nutrition, usually
      opt for meat or fish as an addition - given the choice. Finances do
      not normally allow this, even if the family produces edible animals
      they are more valuable as capital than food - a chicken might buy a
      week of the local staple or make one or two meals.

      Around the world the relative prices of staples are increasing as
      valuable cash-crops are grown where the staples used to grow.

      Apologies for the digression :)

      Matt

      On Thu, Apr 28, 2011 at 6:03 AM, Martin Naylor
      <martinwnaylor@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > All animals have a very restricted diet and survive what are the differences between humans and animals?
      >
      > martin
    • Show all 6 messages in this topic