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4282Re: [pfaf] Re: Creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)

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  • Margi
    Aug 17, 2009
      Herbal tonics are plants that are considered to be safe to use on an
      ongoing basis. These are the herbs that are primarily nutritive in
      action. They include nettles, skullcap, and oats, but there are many
      others. You can research herbal tonic on the internet for more info.

      ~margi

      Patty Martz wrote:
      >
      > "D" said:
      > "The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing
      > basis is short indeed"
      >
      > PLEASE, what IS the SHORT LIST of medicinal plants which are SAFE to
      > use on an ONGOING BASIS???
      >
      > Thanks,
      > PLMartz
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > *From:* Ludd <the_pooh_way@...>
      > *To:* pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      > *Sent:* Monday, August 17, 2009 7:01:19 AM
      > *Subject:* Re: [pfaf] Re: Creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata)
      >
      >
      >
      > I read somewhere that it is a good idea to eat woodsorrel with cheese,
      > for cheese neautralises the oxalic acid. Or does it just provide extra
      > calcium to compensate for the lesser uptake?
      > Ludwig
      >
      > D wrote:
      > > You should probably consult a naturopath before using it over a period
      > > of time.
      > > Usually this type of plant use and knowledge should ne restricted to
      > > 'survival' use only, ie if you find yourself desperate for sustenance,
      > > ie in times of disaster or starvation.
      > > Deliberately restricting uptake of calcium could result in harm to
      > > nerves, bones, etc. Also gall bladder I think may need removing if you
      > > make a habit of this type of eating.
      > > Cooking usually renders oxalic acids less harmful, but also destroys
      > > Vitamin C, so it seems counter-productive to use it as a food on an
      > > ongoing basis.
      > >
      > > Perhaps there is excessive worship of the humble weed in PC circles,
      > > proving that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
      > > If its a native species, try consulting the indigenous plant use
      > history
      > > in your area, even if that means exhuming old records from documents in
      > > library arhives, and also various internet research.
      > > Dont use yourself as the guinea pig.
      > >
      > > Personally I prefer parsley, still one of the top 10 cultivated plants
      > > in terms of nutritional value.
      > > Perennial spinach is another favourite, which is better tasting than
      > > silver beet (another species which is toxic over time unless cooked,
      > due
      > > to oxalic acid content).
      > >
      > > Many herbs and plants, whilst they have a medicinal value, should only
      > > be used to correct specific health conditions, and never ingested
      > > regularly. More is not better!
      > > The list of medicinal plants which are safe to use on an ongoing basis
      > > is short indeed
      > >
      > > Safe eating,
      > > D
      > >
      > > david.keltie@ gmail.com <mailto:david.keltie%40gmail.com> wrote:
      > >
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> So I should 'harvest' it. Any recipes?!
      > >>
      > >> Thanks, David
      > >>
      > >> On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 8:31 PM, <matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
      > >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>> wrote:
      > >>
      > >>> Oxalis corniculata is a good source of vitamin C, all parts of the
      > >>>
      > >> plant are edible. Long term food use is not recommended as it
      > >> restricts the assimilation of calcium.
      > >>
      > >>> The toxic reference is probably to Oxalic acid, present in many
      > >>>
      > >> plants - including rhubarb.
      > >>
      > >>> All the best,
      > >>> Matthew
      > >>>
      > >>> Matthew Sleigh
      > >>> B and T World Seeds
      > >>> Paguignan
      > >>> 34210 Aigues-Vives
      > >>> France
      > >>> matthew@b-and- t-world-seeds. com
      > >>>
      > >> <mailto:matthew% 40b-and-t- world-seeds. com>
      > >>
      > >>> http://b-and- t-world-seeds. com/ <http://b-and- t-world-seeds.
      > com/ <http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/>>
      > >>> fax ++ 33 (0) 4 68 91 30 39
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
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