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Re: Hello

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  • sj_66670
    Dear jdmzhfl, I would first suggest that you read the introduction to: PETRARCH S LYRIC POEMS - The Rime sparse and Other Lyrics, TRANSLATED BY ROBERT
    Message 1 of 90 , Feb 26, 2002
      Dear jdmzhfl,<br><br>I would first suggest that
      you read the introduction to: PETRARCH'S LYRIC POEMS
      - The Rime sparse and Other Lyrics, TRANSLATED BY
      ROBERT DURLING. It should be available in most
      libraries.<br><br>Petrarch's Italian poems are of the following
      schemes:<br>Sonnet<br>Canzone<br>Sestina<br>Ballata<br>Madrigale<br><br>He wrote most often using the following verses:
      hendecasyllables (verses consisting of 11 syllables) and
      septenaries (7 syllables). Note that the English sonnet is
      based on Iambic Pentameter, a verse consisting of five
      stressed feet, classically composed of a short and long
      syllable, is not quite the same (in English poetry this
      typically yields a 10 syllable verse, although the stresses
      are not "quantitative", that is, consisting of
      combination of short and long syllables, but "qualitative",
      composed of unaccented and accented syllables; many
      English verses are truncate, that is, they end on an
      accented syllable, which yields 10 syllables: "How do I
      love thee? Let me count the ways"; when the accent
      falls on the penultimate -- next to last syllable --
      the result is 11 syllables "Whether 'tis nobler in
      the mind to suffer"). The Italian hendecasyllable
      consists of 3 or 4 accented syllables, usually marked by a
      distinct pause, called an ictus (a strong ictus can be
      seen in the above verse by Elizabeth Barret Browning,
      where, if the poem is read with a Trochaic accentuation
      (strong/weak stresses), "thee? Let" are both stressed, causing
      a sense of pause).<br><br>The canzone ("song", of
      Proven�al origin, is a multi-strophed composition often
      alternating between verses of different lengths and with an
      elaborate rhyme scheme. Each strophe is composed of two
      parts, the "fronte" and the "sirma". In turn, these are
      composed of typically two parts, called the "stanza". The
      sonnet is, in actuality, an isolated strophe of a
      canzone (the first to use this form was Giacomo da
      Lentini, a Sicilian poet, around 1230 in the court of
      Frederic II). If we take the sonnet as an example of the
      canzone's strophe, the following schemes emerge(a capital
      letter indicates a hendecasyllable)<br><br>A 1st stanza
      fronte<br>B<br>B<br>A<br><br>A 2nd stanza<br>B<br>B<br>A<br><br>C 3rd stanza
      sirma<br>D<br>E<br><br>C 4th stanza<br>D<br>E<br><br>The rhyme scheme can
      vary (in the sonnet usually limited to the sirma).
      Internal rhyme may also occur. Finally, the canzone is
      concluded by several independent verses, often based on the
      last stanza of the sirma, called a "congedo". Again,
      the canzone takes different forms; Petrarch at his
      best breaks away from the Proven�al and Sicilian
      models.
    • jdmzhfl
      Thank you very much for the assistance. You have been a great, and much appriciated, help.
      Message 90 of 90 , Feb 27, 2002
        Thank you very much for the assistance. You have been a great, and much appriciated, help.
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