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Tuesday December 18: Perl is 20; Perl Seminar is 7

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  • James E Keenan
    Our December meeting falls on Perl s 20th birthday. And Perl Seminar NY started in December 2000, so in our 8th season we re celebrating our 7th birthday! So
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 6, 2007
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      Our December meeting falls on Perl's 20th birthday. And Perl Seminar
      NY started in December 2000, so in our 8th season we're celebrating
      our 7th birthday! So chances are good that after Steve's talk
      (below), celebration will occur!

      Perl Seminar NY
      Tuesday, December 18, 2007
      6:15-8:15 pm
      NYPC User Group office suite
      481 8th Ave, Suite 550
      (between West 34 & 35 Sts, Manhattan)

      Steve Lembark, "Developing a Fast Linked List in Perl: Why and How"

      Abstract:
      Perl will iterate a single array quickly using
      the 'foreach (@array)' loop. This works for a large number of
      cases, but does not handle the case of comparing
      two lists to one another: the for loop only gives
      you one loop 'for free'. This leaves $otherloop[$i]
      as the main alternative for non-destructively
      examining the other loop.

      Problems start when both lists are long. Things start to bog down on
      computing the offset of
      entries in a 100K list.

      Linked list classes in Perl are up there with
      java compilers in rarity. The only linked list
      class around uses doubly-linked lists, which
      are flexable but bulky and slow.

      There are two ways to handle this: inline code
      or an object. The inline code is reasonably
      fast, the object is a bit tricky to implement
      however. Object:: LinkedList implements an object for handling linked
      lists. That's what we'll talk about on December 18.
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