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Re: Re[2]: [PBML] really dumb question

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  • petrawolf
    thanks, Daniel. When english isn t your native language it isn t easy sometimes...:-) Petra ... From: Daniel Gardner To:
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 13, 2001
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      thanks, Daniel. When english isn't your native language it isn't easy
      sometimes...:-)

      Petra
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Daniel Gardner" <perl@...>
      To: "petrawolf" <perl-beginner@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2001 11:12 PM
      Subject: Re[2]: [PBML] really dumb question


      > as an addendum...
      >
      > when you're talking about common constructs in code you'll usually use
      > the words "foo", "bar", and then often "quux" as variable names to
      > illustrate a generic example
      >
      > quoting:
      http://www.tuxedo.org/~esr/jargon/html/entry/metasyntactic-variable.html
      >
      > A name used in examples and understood to stand for whatever thing
      > is under discussion, or any random member of a class of things
      > under discussion. The word foo is the canonical example. To avoid
      > confusion, hackers never (well, hardly ever) use `foo' or other
      > words like it as permanent names for anything. In filenames, a
      > common convention is that any filename beginning with a
      > metasyntactic-variable name is a scratch file that may be deleted
      > at any time.
      >
      > so, say you ask "how do i set a cookie?", there's a good chance you'll
      > be shown how to set a cookie called "foo", and quite possibly with the
      > value "bar"
      >
      > hope that helps,
      > daniel
      >
      >
      >
      > p> thanks for the explanation ;-)
      >
      > p> Petra
      > p> ----- Original Message -----
      > p> From: "Gary Taylor" <1@...>
      > p> To: <perl-beginner@yahoogroups.com>
      > p> Sent: Saturday, October 13, 2001 4:32 PM
      > p> Subject: Re: [PBML] really dumb question
      >
      >
      > >> In the military, the acronym FUBAR means F*cked Up Beyond Any Repair,
      and
      > p> the
      > >> internet was first a military concept. Being of a military background,
      I
      > p> can
      > >> verify that the term FUBAR is used quite frequently, and it is
      pronounced
      > >> foobar. So it stands to reason that some of the slang terminology
      would
      > p> seep
      > >> in to the development. I read this a few years ago in a magazine
      article,
      > p> but
      > >> don't remember which one. If you need a source, I would guess PC
      World,
      > p> or
      > >> possibly Computer Shopper, but not sure. HTH
      > >>
      > >> Gary
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> petrawolf wrote:
      > >>
      > >> > Hi everyone,
      > >> > in one of the recent posts was this:
      > >> >
      > >> > >Content-type: text/html
      > >> > >Set-Cookie: foo=bar; path=/; expires=Mon, 01-Jan-2001 00:00:00 GMT
      > >> >
      > >> > Now, what is foo???? I've seen it so many times but what does foo=bar
      > p> mean?
      > >> > thanks for putting up with me
      > >> > Petra
      > >> >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
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