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Re: [PBML] [Commercial] Training on Perl Automation by Industry Professionals

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  • Andy Dixon
    On Sat, 2008-01-12 at 10:14, merlyn@stonehenge.com wrote: ... Surely this is still a valid way of displaying it. If you are getting picky, they are both
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 12, 2008
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      On Sat, 2008-01-12 at 10:14, merlyn@... wrote:
      <SNIP>
      >
      > What is "PERL"? Surely not the programming language, which is spelled
      > "Perl".

      Surely this is still a valid way of displaying it. If you are getting
      picky, they are both spelt the same, just typed differently. Perl/PERL
      is an acronym for Practical Extraction and Report Language, so either
      way sould be fine.

      >
      > Would you trust a company that can't even:
      >
      > a) learn to spell Perl properly or
      > b) learn NOT TO SPAM THIS MAILING LIST
      >
      > Sheesh.
      >
      > A pox on you, sirs.
      >

      *relurks*
    • Jenda Krynicky
      To: perl-beginner@yahoogroups.com From: Andy Dixon Date sent: Sat, 12 Jan 2008 14:48:33
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 12, 2008
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        To: perl-beginner@yahoogroups.com
        From: Andy Dixon <andy.dixon@...>
        Date sent: Sat, 12 Jan 2008 14:48:33 +0000
        Subject: Re: [PBML] [Commercial] Training on Perl Automation
        by Industry
        Professionals
        Send reply to: perl-beginner@yahoogroups.com

        > On Sat, 2008-01-12 at 10:14, merlyn@... wrote:
        > <SNIP>
        > >
        > > What is "PERL"? Surely not the programming language, which is spelled
        > > "Perl".
        >
        > Surely this is still a valid way of displaying it. If you are getting
        > picky, they are both spelt the same, just typed differently. Perl/PERL
        > is an acronym for Practical Extraction and Report Language, so either
        > way sould be fine.

        It's a backronym. The "Practical Extraction and Report Language"
        sentence was created later than the language.
        See http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Perl_Programming


        It's Perl (the language) or perl (the interpreter).

        And the fun is that these guys were already told so last time they
        spammed the list.

        Jenda
        ===== Jenda@... === http://Jenda.Krynicky.cz =====
        When it comes to wine, women and song, wizards are allowed
        to get drunk and croon as much as they like.
        -- Terry Pratchett in Sourcery
      • merlyn@stonehenge.com
        ... Andy On Sat, 2008-01-12 at 10:14, merlyn@stonehenge.com wrote: Andy ... Andy Surely this is still a valid way of displaying it. You say still
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 12, 2008
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          >>>>> "Andy" == Andy Dixon <andy.dixon@...> writes:

          Andy> On Sat, 2008-01-12 at 10:14, merlyn@... wrote:
          Andy> <SNIP>
          >>
          >> What is "PERL"? Surely not the programming language, which is spelled
          >> "Perl".

          Andy> Surely this is still a valid way of displaying it.

          You say "still" implying "at one time, it was valid".

          It was *never* valid. I started using Perl version 1. It was *never*
          spelled all caps.

          In fact, spelling Perl with all caps is a good "shibboleth": an indication
          that the person using the name is *not* clued in to the existing literature,
          or even familiar with the Perl FAQ, which on this subject is very clear:

          What's the difference between "perl" and "Perl"?
          One bit. Oh, you weren't talking ASCII? :-) Larry now uses "Perl" to
          signify the language proper and "perl" the implementation of it, i.e.
          the current interpreter. Hence Tom's quip that "Nothing but perl can
          parse Perl." You may or may not choose to follow this usage. For
          example, parallelism means "awk and perl" and "Python and Perl" look OK,
          while "awk and Perl" and "Python and perl" do not. But never write
          "PERL", because perl is not an acronym, apocryphal folklore and
          post-facto expansions notwithstanding.

          Now, if you're selling *Perl training*, and you haven't even read the
          rediculously easy-to-find Perl FAQ, how can you be trusted to get ANYTHING
          ELSE RIGHT?

          --
          Randal L. Schwartz - Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc. - +1 503 777 0095
          <merlyn@...> <URL:http://www.stonehenge.com/merlyn/>
          Perl/Unix/security consulting, Technical writing, Comedy, etc. etc.
          See PerlTraining.Stonehenge.com for onsite and open-enrollment Perl training!
        • Andy Dixon
          ... Still does not necessarily mean that it was in the past. I am a relative new-comer to perl compared to you, and as a consequence dont know as much
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 12, 2008
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            On Sat, 2008-01-12 at 18:04, merlyn@... wrote:
            > >>>>> "Andy" == Andy Dixon <andy.dixon@...>
            > writes:
            >
            > Andy> On Sat, 2008-01-12 at 10:14, merlyn@... wrote:
            > Andy> <SNIP>
            > >>
            > >> What is "PERL"? Surely not the programming language, which is
            > spelled
            > >> "Perl".
            >
            > Andy> Surely this is still a valid way of displaying it.
            >
            > You say "still" implying "at one time, it was valid".
            > It was *never* valid. I started using Perl version 1. It was *never*
            > spelled all caps.
            >
            > In fact, spelling Perl with all caps is a good "shibboleth": an
            > indication
            > that the person using the name is *not* clued in to the existing
            > literature,
            > or even familiar with the Perl FAQ, which on this subject is very
            > clear:
            >
            <SNIP>
            'Still' does not necessarily mean that it was in the past. I am a
            relative new-comer to perl compared to you, and as a consequence dont
            know as much as you, so thanks to Jenda, I now know a bit more about
            Perl, and in the future will be able to retort more accurately.
            >
            > Now, if you're selling *Perl training*, and you haven't even read the
            > rediculously easy-to-find Perl FAQ, how can you be trusted to get
            > ANYTHING
            > ELSE RIGHT?

            Exactly. I see your point. Its like buying a car from a dealer who
            distinguishes different types of car by their colour. The 'sporty' car
            is a 'red car' and the economy car is a 'grey car'.
            When I worked for a UK ISP, I had a similar series of calls from
            so-called 'IT Consultants' who charge thousands of pounds for a
            Microsoft Publisher website. Always fun to tear into them on the phone
            when they are on-site.

            Andy
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