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Re: [PBML] What modules

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  • merlyn@stonehenge.com
    ... Dukelow, I deal with quit a few servers all of which have several versions of Dukelow, Perl on them so I know about the -v and -V options. But is there
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 21, 2007
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      >>>>> "Dukelow," == Dukelow, Don <dukelow@...> writes:

      Dukelow,> I deal with quit a few servers all of which have several versions of
      Dukelow,> Perl on them so I know about the -v and -V options. But is there a
      Dukelow,> command or something to see what modules have been installed.

      You need to learn about the Perl FAQ. You should be reading at least the
      table of contents of the FAQ weekly until you know what's in there:

      perldoc perlfaq

      And you can search the faq with "perldoc -q". For example, "perldoc -q
      installed" reveals:

      Found in /usr/libdata/perl5/pod/perlfaq3.pod
      How do I find which modules are installed on my system?
      You can use the ExtUtils::Installed module to show all installed
      distributions, although it can take awhile to do its magic. The standard
      library which comes with Perl just shows up as "Perl" (although you can
      get those with Module::CoreList).

      use ExtUtils::Installed;

      my $inst = ExtUtils::Installed->new();
      my @modules = $inst->modules();

      If you want a list of all of the Perl module filenames, you can use
      File::Find::Rule.

      use File::Find::Rule;

      my @files = File::Find::Rule->file()->name( '*.pm' )->in( @INC );

      If you do not have that module, you can do the same thing with
      File::Find which is part of the standard library.

      use File::Find;
      my @files;

      find(
      sub {
      push @files, $File::Find::name
      if -f $File::Find::name && /\.pm$/
      },

      @INC
      );

      print join "\n", @files;

      If you simply need to quickly check to see if a module is available, you
      can check for its documentation. If you can read the documentation the
      module is most likely installed. If you cannot read the documentation,
      the module might not have any (in rare cases).

      prompt% perldoc Module::Name

      You can also try to include the module in a one-liner to see if perl
      finds it.

      perl -MModule::Name -e1




      --
      Randal L. Schwartz - Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc. - +1 503 777 0095
      <merlyn@...> <URL:http://www.stonehenge.com/merlyn/>
      Perl/Unix/security consulting, Technical writing, Comedy, etc. etc.
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