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Re: [PBML] Re: Extreme beginner question

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  • Chad Perrin
    ... As someone else pointed out, it might be helpful to consider whether you should include file opening/closing/testing operations in the subroutines, in
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 15, 2006
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      On Sun, Oct 15, 2006 at 08:37:08AM -0700, Liz Reader wrote:
      >
      > I don't know of any historical or future planning reason for the subroutines being used, but I'll
      > take your advice and ask. I was thinking that the subroutines were an unnecessarily complicated
      > approach, but being new, wasn't sure if I should trust myself or if there was something I was
      > missing.

      As someone else pointed out, it might be helpful to consider whether you
      should include file opening/closing/testing operations in the
      subroutines, in which case it would become worthwhile to use the
      subroutines rather than cramming everything directly into procedural
      code. It also might be worth your while to consider whether those
      strings that are being sent to the subroutines need to be sent to it or
      could simply be contained within it and, while you're at it, you might
      consider whether in the case of your program in particular they might
      all be combined into a single subroutine that takes an argument telling
      it which set of operations to perform. Modularity is generally good,
      but pointless, excessive modularity can just slow things down and make
      it difficult to maintain code later. It'll probably end up being a
      judgment call, really.


      >
      > Thanks very much for your help!

      I aim to please.

      --
      CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
      "There comes a time in the history of any project when it becomes necessary
      to shoot the engineers and begin production." - MacUser, November 1990
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