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RE: [PBML] Any Module for Shopping Cart

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  • Charles K. Clarkson
    ... Start with CGI::Applications. Seriously consider using templates. I like HTML::Template. YMMV. Many of the template systems merge into CGI::Application
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2002
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      Prakash Kumar [mailto:prakash@...] asked:
      : Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2002 4:51 PM
      : To: perl-beginner@yahoogroups.com
      : Subject: [PBML] Any Module for Shopping Cart
      :
      : Hello Friends,
      :
      : I would like to start a shopping cart from scratch..
      : but i checked cpan.org and could not find any module (main
      : division) is there any module will make my development
      : easier.. (purpose of CPAN!!)

      Start with CGI::Applications.

      Seriously consider using templates.
      I like HTML::Template. YMMV.

      Many of the template systems merge into
      CGI::Application seamlessly. CGI.pm does too.

      Definitely use style sheets.
      The <font> tag is dead!

      So are many other common html constructs. Read
      the W3C CSS2 Specification. I have it bookmarked
      http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/. Consider XML. It
      has a learning curve, but may provide you with
      a better solution.

      An Object Oriented solution seems most desirable.
      Group your subroutines into your own modules.

      For instance, create a module to interact with
      the cart contents. Design the methods to interact
      with the rest of your app. Later, when you switch
      databases, you'll only need to change this module.
      Everything else stays the same.
      This insulation is what you want throughout the
      shopping cart application. You might have another
      module for user authorization, user interaction,
      shipping, taxes, inventory control, etc.

      Become familiar with the retail accounting tools.
      Gross Margin Return on Inventory Investment (GMROI)
      is just the tip of this iceberg.

      A shopping cart needs to aid the merchant as well
      as the shopper. RedHat Interchange (a perl shopping
      cart) features a related item database to suggest
      related items to purchasers. A hardware store might
      mention a door knob when someone buys a door slab.
      Reports about the merchant's business (or lack
      thereof) are critical. A transaction database would
      aid in inventory turns reporting and may allow
      merchants to produce custom reports from the
      database without your interaction.



      If you want more specific advice on building a
      cart, hop on over to perlmonks.com and ask the same
      question. Also take a look around sourceforge.net,
      they have a number of carts in open source and you
      might rather join their teams than do-it-yourself.


      HTH,
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