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Re: [pepysdiary] Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds

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  • John Mertz
    Very interesting, indeed. In reading the Diary, I was wondering if London had many cats, which would theoretically control rodents, hence fleas and plague. At
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2010
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      Very interesting, indeed. In reading the Diary, I was wondering if London had many cats, which would theoretically control rodents, hence fleas and plague.
      At one time they were supersitious about them. They should have kept the cats.
       
       
      --- On Mon, 11/1/10, SusannaG@... <SusannaG@...> wrote:

      From: SusannaG@... <SusannaG@...>
      Subject: Re: [pepysdiary] Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds
      To: pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, November 1, 2010, 12:38 PM

       
      I believe that's pretty much what was already believed; that the plague came from China.  This is just further evidence, though very interesting.




      -----Original Message-----
      From: terry foreman <terry.foreman@...>
      To: pepysdiary-yahoogroup <pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Mon, Nov 1, 2010 12:35 pm
      Subject: [pepysdiary] Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds

       

      Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds

      By NICHOLAS WADE
      Published: October 31, 2010

      The great waves of plague that twice devastated Europe and changed the course of history had their origins in China, a team of medical geneticists reported Sunday, as did a third plague outbreak that struck less harmfully in the 19th century.

      And in separate research, a team of biologists reported conclusively this month that the causative agent of the most deadly plague, the Black Death, was the bacterium known as Yersinia pestis. This agent had always been the favored cause, but a vigorous minority of biologists and historians have argued the Black Death differed from modern cases of plague studied in India, and therefore must have had a different cause.
      The Black Death began in Europe in 1347 and carried off an estimated 30 percent or more of the population of Europe. For centuries the epidemic continued to strike every 10 years or so, its last major outbreak being the Great Plague of London from 1665 to 1666. The disease is spread by rats and transmitted to people by fleas or, in some cases, directly by breathing.



    • SusannaG@aol.com
      I know in of at least one occasion when the response to the plague was to kill all the dogs and cats, which would have made things worse! ... From: John Mertz
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2010
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        I know in of at least one occasion when the response to the plague was to kill all the dogs and cats, which would have made things worse!




        -----Original Message-----
        From: John Mertz <jm387407@...>
        To: pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, Nov 1, 2010 12:47 pm
        Subject: Re: [pepysdiary] Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds

         
        Very interesting, indeed. In reading the Diary, I was wondering if London had many cats, which would theoretically control rodents, hence fleas and plague.
        At one time they were supersitious about them. They should have kept the cats.
         
         
        --- On Mon, 11/1/10, SusannaG@... <SusannaG@...> wrote:

        From: SusannaG@... <SusannaG@...>
        Subject: Re: [pepysdiary] Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds
        To: pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, November 1, 2010, 12:38 PM

         
        I believe that's pretty much what was already believed; that the plague came from China.  This is just further evidence, though very interesting.




        -----Original Message-----
        From: terry foreman <terry.foreman@...>
        To: pepysdiary-yahoogroup <pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Mon, Nov 1, 2010 12:35 pm
        Subject: [pepysdiary] Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds

         

        Europe’s Plagues Came From China, Study Finds

        By NICHOLAS WADE
        Published: October 31, 2010

        The great waves of plague that twice devastated Europe and changed the course of history had their origins in China, a team of medical geneticists reported Sunday, as did a third plague outbreak that struck less harmfully in the 19th century.

        And in separate research, a team of biologists reported conclusively this month that the causative agent of the most deadly plague, the Black Death, was the bacterium known as Yersinia pestis. This agent had always been the favored cause, but a vigorous minority of biologists and historians have argued the Black Death differed from modern cases of plague studied in India, and therefore must have had a different cause.
        The Black Death began in Europe in 1347 and carried off an estimated 30 percent or more of the population of Europe. For centuries the epidemic continued to strike every 10 years or so, its last major outbreak being the Great Plague of London from 1665 to 1666. The disease is spread by rats and transmitted to people by fleas or, in some cases, directly by breathing.



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