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Re: [pepysdiary] help, please, to access information in emailed diary entries

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  • Charles Elmore
    Thanks, Charles I wonder if anyone in the Pepys group has any knowledge of Lorenzo Da Ponte, who I consider the Pepys of the 17th century (although he wasn t a
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 20 1:23 AM
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      Thanks, Charles
      I wonder if anyone in the Pepys group has any knowledge of Lorenzo Da Ponte, who I consider the Pepys of the 17th century (although he wasn't a member of the aristocracy). He was a hired hand-- I have a translation of his Memoirs by Elizabeth Abbott. My interest in Daponte stems from the fact that he was a lyricist/educator/delivery man. I took the opposite track, having a 24.5 year career with United Parcel Service, junior high teacher, and since-birth church musician. I strongly recommend that anyone reading the Memoirs, read the preface by Charles Rosen.
      Shawn Elmore

      --- On Sat, 7/18/09, Charles Reiss <charles.reiss@...> wrote:

      From: Charles Reiss <charles.reiss@...>
      Subject: Re: [pepysdiary] help, please, to access information in emailed diary entries
      To: pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, July 18, 2009, 3:08 PM

       
      Edward Kynaston did exist - see his entry in Wikipedia. Don't know about Chas II prime ministers but there is a great novel about actors and actresses of that period called The Vizard Mask by Diana Norman. Romantic but full of historic detail. Strongly recommend. 

      2009/7/18 Charles Elmore <charles_elmore2001@ yahoo.com>
       
      I wrote about two weeks ago regarding an audition for the part of Samuel Pepys for the Oklahoma City Community Theatre called Carpenter's Square Troupe. Thanks to all who sent information about Pepys' physical appearance. Although I did not get the role of Pepys, I have been cast as Hyde, prime minister to Charles II.
      I have checked out 2-3 biographies on Pepys so that I can do research for the play since the play centers on Pepys and a male actor playing female roles in the English theatre. The actor's name is Kynaston...Does anybody know if this male aactor in female roles was real or fiction? Also, can anyone suggest any books about Charles II's reign, particularly his prime ministers.
      Shawn Elmore

      --- On Sat, 7/18/09, charlesseris <charles.reiss@ gmail.com> wrote:

      From: charlesseris <charles.reiss@ gmail.com>
      Subject: [pepysdiary] help, please, to access information in emailed diary entries
      To: pepysdiary@yahoogro ups.com
      Date: Saturday, July 18, 2009, 7:18 AM


       
      New arrival at this brilliant site. I fear this question has been asked (and answered) before but I can't find it in search...

      On the main diary entries, simply placing the cursor over one of the highlighted words or names elicits a brief background note, which is fast and invaluable.

      I would very much like to do the same on the daily emailed entries but the option doesn't seem to work. Clicking, in either mode, opens a new page which often has much more detail than I want and - crucially - holds up the flow.

      Am I missing something obvious? Is there a way round this?

      With thanks
      Charles




    • Paul Chapin
      To Charles/Shawn Elmore - Lorenzo Da Ponte was an interesting man indeed. He was actually a man of the 18th and 19th centuries, not the 17th (1749-1838). He
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 21 11:41 AM
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        To Charles/Shawn Elmore –

         

        Lorenzo Da Ponte was an interesting man indeed.  He was actually a man of the 18th and 19th centuries, not the 17th (1749-1838).  He wrote the librettos for 28 operas, including three of Mozart’s greatest:  The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Cosi Fan Tutte.   He also wrote a libretto for Gluck, and five for Salieri, Mozart’s supposed rival.  In the early 1800s, having lost his patronage in Europe, he move to the young United States, and was a grocer in Philadelphia, a bookstore owner in New York City, a professor of Italian at Columbia, and an opera impresario.  He is buried in Brooklyn, New York. Wikipedia has more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorenzo_Da_Ponte

         

        I haven’t read his memoirs, but I expect they would be fascinating.

         

        Paul Chapin

         

         

      • Charles Elmore
        I knew he moved to the United States. Some of his family moved to New Orleans and I had a student in Moore Ok that was his great great grandson. In his
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 22 9:33 PM
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          I knew he moved to the United States. Some of his family moved to New Orleans and I had a student in Moore Ok that was his great great grandson. In his memoirs, he recounts a meeting with Napoleon, who marched through his town during his conquests in Europe. He alos knew Casanova personally.I would highly recommend this book.
          Shawn Elmore 
          --- On Tue, 7/21/09, Paul Chapin <pgchapin@...> wrote:

          From: Paul Chapin <pgchapin@...>
          Subject: [pepysdiary] Re: help, please, to access information in emailed diary entries
          To: pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 1:41 PM

           

          To Charles/Shawn Elmore –

           

          Lorenzo Da Ponte was an interesting man indeed.  He was actually a man of the 18th and 19th centuries, not the 17th (1749-1838).  He wrote the librettos for 28 operas, including three of Mozart’s greatest:  The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Cosi Fan Tutte.   He also wrote a libretto for Gluck, and five for Salieri, Mozart’s supposed rival.  In the early 1800s, having lost his patronage in Europe, he move to the young United States, and was a grocer in Philadelphia, a bookstore owner in New York City, a professor of Italian at Columbia, and an opera impresario.  He is buried in Brooklyn, New York. Wikipedia has more at http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Lorenzo_Da_ Ponte

           

          I haven’t read his memoirs, but I expect they would be fascinating.

           

          Paul Chapin

           

           


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