Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Reaching Here

Expand Messages
  • Terry Foreman
    Time flows by in waves. Capturing its discrete moments is the work of art or history. Once history’s waves were literal. They brought Europeans to American
    Message 1 of 6 , May 31, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Time flows by in waves. Capturing its discrete moments is the work of art
      or history. Once history’s waves were literal. They brought Europeans to
      American shores. The English — dour and methodical Pilgrims and Puritans,
      swaggering Virginia planters — long hogged our history books. But the waves
      brought other Europeans as well. Precisely 400 years ago, in 1609, Henry
      Hudson rounded Sandy Hook, a craggy arm of a peninsula reaching out from
      what became New Jersey toward Long Island, and nosed his way into New York
      Harbor. Hudson was English, too, but through an accident of history his
      most momentous voyage would be for the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch
      laid claim to the territory he charted and planted a colony — New
      Netherland, with its capital of New Amsterdam — on the wilderness island of
      Manhattan. The Dutch Republic was Europe’s melting pot: its mixed society
      created a multiethnic population on Manhattan, and the Dutch invention
      called tolerance came along as social glue. The Dutch also pioneered the
      principles of capitalism, and those two seeds, tolerance and free trade,
      flourished in the colony’s virgin soil. They formed the primary ingredients
      of what would become, under the English, New York City.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/magazine/31ocean-t.html?ref=magazine
    • Michael Robinson
      Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam:Return to Manhattan (Weerzien met Manhattan) 400th Anniversary of Henry Hudson s Voyage
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam:Return to Manhattan (Weerzien met Manhattan) 400th Anniversary of Henry Hudson's Voyage

        http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/400jaar-nieuw-amsterdam-new-york?lang=en

        Click on right side of page to show the Johannes Vingboons 'view' C. 1665.

        --- In pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com, Terry Foreman <terry.foreman@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Time flows by in waves. Capturing its discrete moments is the work of art
        > or history. Once history's waves were literal. They brought Europeans to
        > American shores. The English — dour and methodical Pilgrims and Puritans,
        > swaggering Virginia planters — long hogged our history books. But the waves
        > brought other Europeans as well. Precisely 400 years ago, in 1609, Henry
        > Hudson rounded Sandy Hook, a craggy arm of a peninsula reaching out from
        > what became New Jersey toward Long Island, and nosed his way into New York
        > Harbor. Hudson was English, too, but through an accident of history his
        > most momentous voyage would be for the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch
        > laid claim to the territory he charted and planted a colony — New
        > Netherland, with its capital of New Amsterdam — on the wilderness island of
        > Manhattan. The Dutch Republic was Europe's melting pot: its mixed society
        > created a multiethnic population on Manhattan, and the Dutch invention
        > called tolerance came along as social glue. The Dutch also pioneered the
        > principles of capitalism, and those two seeds, tolerance and free trade,
        > flourished in the colony's virgin soil. They formed the primary ingredients
        > of what would become, under the English, New York City.
        >
        > http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/magazine/31ocean-t.html?ref=magazine
        >
      • Terry Foreman
        A larger image of the Johannes Vingboons view that Michael Robinson was so kind to point out. http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=29838
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 2, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          A larger image of the Johannes Vingboons 'view' that Michael Robinson was
          so kind to point out.

          http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=29838


          At 06:42 AM 6/2/2009 +0000, you wrote:

          >Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam:Return to Manhattan (Weerzien met Manhattan) 400th
          >Anniversary of Henry Hudson's Voyage
          >
          >http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/400jaar-nieuw-amsterdam-new-york?lang=en
          >
          >Click on right side of page to show the Johannes Vingboons 'view' C. 1665.
          >
          >--- In pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com, Terry Foreman <terry.foreman@...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Time flows by in waves. Capturing its discrete moments is the work of art
          > > or history. Once history's waves were literal. They brought Europeans to
          > > American shores. The English — dour and methodical Pilgrims and Puritans,
          > > swaggering Virginia planters — long hogged our history books. But the
          > waves
          > > brought other Europeans as well. Precisely 400 years ago, in 1609, Henry
          > > Hudson rounded Sandy Hook, a craggy arm of a peninsula reaching out from
          > > what became New Jersey toward Long Island, and nosed his way into New York
          > > Harbor. Hudson was English, too, but through an accident of history his
          > > most momentous voyage would be for the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch
          > > laid claim to the territory he charted and planted a colony — New
          > > Netherland, with its capital of New Amsterdam — on the wilderness
          > island of
          > > Manhattan. The Dutch Republic was Europe's melting pot: its mixed society
          > > created a multiethnic population on Manhattan, and the Dutch invention
          > > called tolerance came along as social glue. The Dutch also pioneered the
          > > principles of capitalism, and those two seeds, tolerance and free trade,
          > > flourished in the colony's virgin soil. They formed the primary
          > ingredients
          > > of what would become, under the English, New York City.
          > >
          > > http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/magazine/31ocean-t.html?ref=magazine
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >No virus found in this incoming message.
          >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          >Version: 8.5.339 / Virus Database: 270.12.49/2149 - Release Date: 06/01/09
          >17:55:00
        • Susan Thomas
          Wonderful picture! Thank you to both Terry and Michael - wish I could see the exhibition A.S.
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 2, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Wonderful picture! Thank you to both Terry and Michael - wish I could
            see the exhibition

            A.S.

            Terry Foreman wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > A larger image of the Johannes Vingboons 'view' that Michael Robinson was
            > so kind to point out.
            >
            > http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=29838
            > <http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=29838>
            >
            > At 06:42 AM 6/2/2009 +0000, you wrote:
            >
            > >Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam:Return to Manhattan (Weerzien met Manhattan)
            > 400th
            > >Anniversary of Henry Hudson's Voyage
            > >
            > >http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/400jaar-nieuw-amsterdam-new-york?lang=en
            > <http://www.rijksmuseum.nl/400jaar-nieuw-amsterdam-new-york?lang=en>
            > >
            > >Click on right side of page to show the Johannes Vingboons 'view' C.
            > 1665.
            > >
            > >--- In pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com
            > <mailto:pepysdiary%40yahoogroups.com>, Terry Foreman
            > <terry.foreman@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Time flows by in waves. Capturing its discrete moments is the work
            > of art
            > > > or history. Once history's waves were literal. They brought
            > Europeans to
            > > > American shores. The English — dour and methodical Pilgrims and
            > Puritans,
            > > > swaggering Virginia planters — long hogged our history books. But the
            > > waves
            > > > brought other Europeans as well. Precisely 400 years ago, in 1609,
            > Henry
            > > > Hudson rounded Sandy Hook, a craggy arm of a peninsula reaching
            > out from
            > > > what became New Jersey toward Long Island, and nosed his way into
            > New York
            > > > Harbor. Hudson was English, too, but through an accident of
            > history his
            > > > most momentous voyage would be for the Dutch East India Company.
            > The Dutch
            > > > laid claim to the territory he charted and planted a colony — New
            > > > Netherland, with its capital of New Amsterdam — on the wilderness
            > > island of
            > > > Manhattan. The Dutch Republic was Europe's melting pot: its mixed
            > society
            > > > created a multiethnic population on Manhattan, and the Dutch invention
            > > > called tolerance came along as social glue. The Dutch also
            > pioneered the
            > > > principles of capitalism, and those two seeds, tolerance and free
            > trade,
            > > > flourished in the colony's virgin soil. They formed the primary
            > > ingredients
            > > > of what would become, under the English, New York City.
            > > >
            > > >
            > http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/magazine/31ocean-t.html?ref=magazine
            > <http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/31/magazine/31ocean-t.html?ref=magazine>
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >------------------------------------
            > >
            > >Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >No virus found in this incoming message.
            > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            > >Version: 8.5.339 / Virus Database: 270.12.49/2149 - Release Date:
            > 06/01/09
            > >17:55:00
            >
            >
          • Phil Gyford
            I fear this will only work for those in the UK, but Radio 4 s In Our Time this morning was all about the trial of Charles I. You can listen again here:
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 4, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              I fear this will only work for those in the UK, but Radio 4's 'In Our
              Time' this morning was all about the trial of Charles I. You can
              listen again here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00kpzd6/In_Our_Time_The_Trial_of_Charles_I/



              --
              Phil Gyford
              http://www.gyford.com/
            • Terry Foreman
              Phil, Beeb sez Outside the UK you can use RealPlayer or Windows Media Player to play programmes. The site prefers RealPlayer, so there we are; and thanks for
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 4, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Phil,

                Beeb sez "Outside the UK you can use RealPlayer or Windows Media Player to
                play programmes."
                The site prefers RealPlayer, so there we are; and thanks for the heads-up.

                Terry

                At 10:29 AM 6/4/2009 +0100, you wrote:
                >I fear this will only work for those in the UK, but Radio 4's 'In Our
                >Time' this morning was all about the trial of Charles I. You can
                >listen again here:
                >http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00kpzd6/In_Our_Time_The_Trial_of_Charles_I/
                >
                >
                >
                >--
                >Phil Gyford
                >http://www.gyford.com/
                >
                >
                >
                >------------------------------------
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >No virus found in this incoming message.
                >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                >Version: 8.5.339 / Virus Database: 270.12.52/2153 - Release Date: 06/03/09
                >18:00:00
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.