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Folger Exhibition: Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper

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  • Michael Robinson
    Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper Curators: Chris R. Kyle (Syracuse University) and Jason Peacey (University College, London) with
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 21, 2008
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      Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper
      Curators: Chris R. Kyle (Syracuse University) and Jason Peacey
      (University College, London) with Elizabeth Walsh (Folger Shakespeare
      Library)

      The first newspaper arrived in England from an Amsterdam publisher on
      December 2, 1620. Containing the latest foreign news, this publication
      immediately sparked a huge demand for up-to-the-minute reports on
      domestic and world events. From stories of war to lurid accounts of
      celebrity scandals among the royal families of Europe, journalism
      exploded into the world of Renaissance England. Gossip in the taverns
      and conversations among the political classes gave way to the
      phenomenon of a wide cross-section of the populace reading the events
      of the days and weeks in cheaply-printed serial publications.

      The early English newspaper has left an indelible mark upon modern
      news culture. Even in its earliest manifestation, we see the emergence
      of the dramatic headline and the editorial, the development of
      tabloids and advertising, and the advent of attempts at state
      censorship and control over the presses. The content of the newspapers
      on exhibit reflects not only politics but the wider cultural, social
      and economic life of the times they covered.

      This exhibition traces the development of journalism and the newspaper
      in England, from the manuscript antecedents of the coranto form to the
      introduction of newspapers in America in the late seventeenth century,
      and the birth of the first daily newspaper in England in 1702.

      September 25, 2008-January 31, 2009
      10am–5pm Monday–Saturday
      Folger Shakespeare Library
      201 East Capitol Street, SE
      Washington, DC 20003

      Exhibition web-site:
      http://www.folger.edu/template.cfm?cid=2793
    • Susan Thomas
      This sounds WONDERFUL! Wish I could get there. Old newspapers are fascinating. I fell in love with reading them when doing research on popular opinion
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 21, 2008
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        This sounds WONDERFUL! Wish I could get there. Old newspapers are
        fascinating. I fell in love with reading them when doing research on
        popular opinion displayed in my local newspapers (Bristol) in the 1790s
        towards events in France. But as I found, read and recorded what I was
        supposed to find, my eye strayed over all sorts of things - local news,
        advertisements - the shipping news of arrivals and departures (so vital
        to bristol), fashion gossip, what was on in the playhouses, even lost
        and found columns.As a librarian, I do rather regret that people no
        longer research newspapers from microfilm reels, but get it in online
        digitized indices. Actually reading the article as it was set up and
        displayed, together with all the other local information, adverts,
        gossip and so on round about it gives a unique flavour to what you are
        reading and, I think, helps with your research, although probably in a
        completely intangible and unquantifiable manner (this from someone
        married to a consultant statistician). I think it is that fascination
        which draws me so much to our Sam: recording events of national and
        historical importance and details of his new clothes with equal attention.

        Australian Susan

        Michael Robinson wrote:
        >
        > Renaissance Journalism and the Birth of the Newspaper
        > Curators: Chris R. Kyle (Syracuse University) and Jason Peacey
        > (University College, London) with Elizabeth Walsh (Folger Shakespeare
        > Library)
        >
        > The first newspaper arrived in England from an Amsterdam publisher on
        > December 2, 1620. Containing the latest foreign news, this publication
        > immediately sparked a huge demand for up-to-the-minute reports on
        > domestic and world events. From stories of war to lurid accounts of
        > celebrity scandals among the royal families of Europe, journalism
        > exploded into the world of Renaissance England. Gossip in the taverns
        > and conversations among the political classes gave way to the
        > phenomenon of a wide cross-section of the populace reading the events
        > of the days and weeks in cheaply-printed serial publications.
        >
        > The early English newspaper has left an indelible mark upon modern
        > news culture. Even in its earliest manifestation, we see the emergence
        > of the dramatic headline and the editorial, the development of
        > tabloids and advertising, and the advent of attempts at state
        > censorship and control over the presses. The content of the newspapers
        > on exhibit reflects not only politics but the wider cultural, social
        > and economic life of the times they covered.
        >
        > This exhibition traces the development of journalism and the newspaper
        > in England, from the manuscript antecedents of the coranto form to the
        > introduction of newspapers in America in the late seventeenth century,
        > and the birth of the first daily newspaper in England in 1702.
        >
        > September 25, 2008-January 31, 2009
        > 10am–5pm Monday–Saturday
        > Folger Shakespeare Library
        > 201 East Capitol Street, SE
        > Washington, DC 20003
        >
        > Exhibition web-site:
        > http://www.folger.edu/template.cfm?cid=2793
        > <http://www.folger.edu/template.cfm?cid=2793>
        >
        >
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