Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [pepysdiary] London's 'white slaves' (published last year)

Expand Messages
  • Eccena@aol.com
    My father was born on Cleveland Way just off MIle End Road in 1894. His mother died when he was three, he was taken into the Dr.Bernardo homes and lived and
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 28 9:57 PM
    • 0 Attachment
           My father was born on Cleveland Way just off MIle End Road in 1894. His mother died when he was three, he was taken into the Dr.Bernardo homes and lived and was schooled there until he was 13 and  then sent to a family in Canada.
           Dr.Bernardo was famous for taking pictures of the thin and bedraggled children he took off the street and then after a year's time taking another picture of the child after a year of good food and in clean clothing. From showing his successes he collected a great deal of money and, I believe, helped many children. I'm happy my father was one of them. I know that Dr. Bernardo's Homes came under scrutiny for misusing funds and the children a while ago, hopefully they are back on track.
           The family my father went to was welcoming and treated him as one of their own. So not all of the kids off the street became slaves.
           Incidents like slave children happened in the United States when homeless children from large eastern cities were put on trains and shipped to the midwest to work in the fields. I'm not sure of the era. 
           Mistreating children is a criminal act.




      Need a new ride? Check out the largest site for U.S. used car listings at AOL Autos.
    • Terry Foreman
      ... Though this topic-creep, concerning the orphan trains see http://www.uoregon.edu/~adoption/topics/orphan.html There were abuses, but also In spite of
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 28 11:23 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        At 12:57 AM 4/29/2008 -0400, Ellen wrote:
        >Incidents like slave children happened in the United States when homeless
        >children from large eastern cities were put on trains and shipped to the
        >midwest to work in the fields. I'm not sure of the era.
        > Mistreating children is a criminal act.

        Though this topic-creep, concerning the "orphan trains" see

        http://www.uoregon.edu/~adoption/topics/orphan.html

        There were abuses, but also "In spite of the trains' stated intention, they
        did not permanently separate most children, geographically or culturally,
        from their parents and communities of origin. Well into the twentieth
        century, impoverished but resourceful parents took advantage of the
        services of middle-class child-savers for their own purposes, including
        temporary caretaking during periods of economic crisis and apprenticeships
        that helped children enter the labor market. "

        There were no oceans crossed.

        Terry Foreman
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.