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Re: [pepysdiary] CD REVIEWS; The Dulcet Sounds of Sales Pitches From 17th-Century Streets

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  • Joel Dinda
    Ah, memories; thanks, Terry, for the reminder. The Cries of London.... My college choir (Macalester College Concert Choir, in St Paul) used the Gibbons piece
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 17 5:22 PM
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      Ah, memories; thanks, Terry, for the reminder. The Cries of London....

      My college choir (Macalester College Concert Choir, in St Paul) used
      the Gibbons piece as as a processional during our 1980-1981 concert
      season. We'd enter from the rear of the room with the men on one aisle
      and the women on another, effectively surrounding the listeners with
      fragmented counterpoint. 'Twas great fun, and generally shocked the
      audience. In some halls, keeping in sync was a bit of a risk, but we
      pulled it off fifteen or twenty times. Hadn't thought of it in *years.*

      Can't say we tried for authenticity, though. Our efforts were directed
      more toward sonic purity.

      Joel Dinda

      On Sun, 05 Aug 2007 17:44:14 -0500, Terry Foreman wrote:
      >
      > Folks,
      >
      > This has been out for a while, but I do not find news of it having been
      > sent around.
      >
      > - Terry
      > aka Terry F
      >
      > -----------------
      >
      > June 11, 2006
      > CD REVIEWS; The Dulcet Sounds of Sales Pitches From 17th-Century Streets
      > By BERNARD HOLLAND
      >
      >
      > The Cries of London
      > Theater of Voices; Fretwork. Harmonia Mundi France HMU 907214; CD.
      >
      > THE recent howls of anguish over the prospect of live advertising in the
      > theater might be softened a little if enough people hear the new CD ''The
      > Cries of London'' from Harmonia Mundi France. Sales pitches captured on the
      > streets of early- to mid-17th-century England were organized into musical
      > form by eminences like Orlando Gibbons and Thomas Weelkes as well as the
      > slightly lesser lights William Cobbold and especially Richard Dering, who
      > to my ears is the star of the show.
      [snipt]
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