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On the trail of cider house jewels By John Sunyer A new initiative offers the English equivalent of the French wine route

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  • terry foreman
    [An excerpt near the end] High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 14, 2013
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      [An excerpt near the end]

      High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@... to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/b365c6f8-cc3a-11e2-bb22-00144feab7de.html#ixzz2WE0Jp8QL

      A new map, produced by James Crowden, a historian and cider expert, highlights 30 of the region’s best small-scale, artisan cider farms, all of which welcome visitors and sell from the farm gate. “The idea is for people to spend a few days in ciderland and remember a time when life was less intense,” Crowden tells me. “The map is the English equivalent of the French wine trail.”

      Until well into the 20th century, cider, rather than beer or ale, was the traditional West Country drink. Devotees have claimed medicinal properties for the beverage, despite its high alcohol content – averaging 6 to 8 per cent. The 18th-century English diarist John Evelyn wrote that cider was “the most wholesome drink in Europe”.

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