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Simon Lewty Absorption: Tachygraphy Drawings At Art First

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  • terry foreman
    For his first exhibition of new work since 2008, Simon Lewty presents a remarkable group of drawings in which compelling new developments are immediately
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 22, 2013
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      For his first exhibition of new work since 2008, Simon Lewty presents a remarkable group of drawings in which compelling new developments are immediately evident. His chance discovery of Thomas Shelton’s 17thC system of shorthand, ‘Tachygraphy’, provided him with a written surface after his own heart that was beautiful, but opaque to all guesses as to its meaning. What a surprise it is to learn that in fact Samuel Pepys used this very system in his famous diary of 1660 – 69 to convey with relish and great verve, an image of the turbulent Baroque age in which he lived.

      [ With an image of a drawing of a page written in Shelten's shorthand. ]
      http://www.artlyst.com/articles/simon-lewty-absorption-tachygraphy-drawings-at-art-first
    • IAN GREENWOOD
      I wonder how you make a chance discovery of 17th century shorthand? Did someone leave it on the tube? Was it placed accidentally in your in-tray? Were you
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 23, 2013
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        I wonder how you make a 'chance discovery' of 17th century shorthand? Did someone leave it on the tube? Was it placed accidentally in your in-tray? Were you surfing the web for a recipe for shortbread? And what would Pepys have made of this execrable artspeak:  "Released into the limitless spaces of the body and the sign, Simon Lewty’s calligraphies are both meditations and performances, surfaces of mystery, devotion and energy"?

        From: terry foreman <terry.foreman@...>
        To: pepysdiary-yahoogroup <pepysdiary@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, 23 March 2013, 3:23
        Subject: [pepysdiary] Simon Lewty Absorption: Tachygraphy Drawings At Art First
         
        For his first exhibition of new work since 2008, Simon Lewty presents a remarkable group of drawings in which compelling new developments are immediately evident. His chance discovery of Thomas Shelton’s 17thC system of shorthand, ‘Tachygraphy’, provided him with a written surface after his own heart that was beautiful, but opaque to all guesses as to its meaning. What a surprise it is to learn that in fact Samuel Pepys used this very system in his famous diary of 1660 – 69 to convey with relish and great verve, an image of the turbulent Baroque age in which he lived.

        [ With an image of a drawing of a page written in Shelten's shorthand. ]
        http://www.artlyst.com/articles/simon-lewty-absorption-tachygraphy-drawings-at-art-first
      • Dorothy Willis
        ... I translate it as, he was goofing around looking at Google Images and thought “Hey, that’s kind of pretty! Never saw that before.” He stopped and
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 23, 2013
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          >I wonder how you make a 'chance discovery' of 17th century shorthand? Did someone leave it on the tube? Was it placed accidentally in your in-tray? Were you >surfing the web for a recipe for shortbread? And what would Pepys have made of this execrable artspeak:  "Released into the limitless spaces of the body >and the sign, Simon Lewty’s calligraphies are both meditations and performances, surfaces of mystery, devotion and energy"?

           

          I translate it as, he was goofing around looking at Google Images and thought “Hey, that’s kind of pretty!  Never saw that before.”  He stopped and read about it and realized it was something with an attractive design, unfamiliar to most people and, most important, not covered by copyright.  Bingo!  His next Great Artistic Production begins.

           

          I can’t imagine Pepys’ reaction, but I doubt it would be favorable.

           

          Dorothy

           

           

        • Susan Thomas
          Pepys was using the shorthand in a simple utilitarian way. He wouldn t, of course, have heard of it, but I am sure he would agree with my assessment that this
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 24, 2013
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            Pepys was using the shorthand in a simple utilitarian way. He wouldn't, of course, have heard of it, but I am sure he would agree with my assessment that this is worthy of Private Eye's Pseuds' Corner

            Sent from my iPhone

            On 24/03/2013, at 1:46 AM, Dorothy Willis <dorothywillis@...> wrote:

             

            >I wonder how you make a 'chance discovery' of 17th century shorthand? Did someone leave it on the tube? Was it placed accidentally in your in-tray? Were you >surfing the web for a recipe for shortbread? And what would Pepys have made of this execrable artspeak:  "Released into the limitless spaces of the body >and the sign, Simon Lewty’s calligraphies are both meditations and performances, surfaces of mystery, devotion and energy"?

             

            I translate it as, he was goofing around looking at Google Images and thought “Hey, that’s kind of pretty!  Never saw that before.”  He stopped and read about it and realized it was something with an attractive design, unfamiliar to most people and, most important, not covered by copyright.  Bingo!  His next Great Artistic Production begins.

             

            I can’t imagine Pepys’ reaction, but I doubt it would be favorable.

             

            Dorothy

             

             

          • Phil Gyford
            The artist could also, of course, have simply used one of the modern forms of shorthand, which would have looked very similar, and been equally impenetrable to
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 25, 2013
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              The artist could also, of course, have simply used one of the modern forms of shorthand, which would have looked very similar, and been equally impenetrable to most viewers, but wouldn't have that esoteric cachet of a no-longer-used centuries-old system.


              On 24 Mar, 2013, at 23:28, Susan Thomas <susan.thomas@...> wrote:

              >
              >
              > Pepys was using the shorthand in a simple utilitarian way. He wouldn't, of course, have heard of it, but I am sure he would agree with my assessment that this is worthy of Private Eye's Pseuds' Corner
              >
              > Sent from my iPhone
              >
              > On 24/03/2013, at 1:46 AM, Dorothy Willis <dorothywillis@...> wrote:
              >
              >>
              >>
              >> >I wonder how you make a 'chance discovery' of 17th century shorthand? Did someone leave it on the tube? Was it placed accidentally in your in-tray? Were you >surfing the web for a recipe for shortbread? And what would Pepys have made of this execrable artspeak: "Released into the limitless spaces of the body >and the sign, Simon Lewty’s calligraphies are both meditations and performances, surfaces of mystery, devotion and energy"?
              >>
              >>
              >> I translate it as, he was goofing around looking at Google Images and thought “Hey, that’s kind of pretty! Never saw that before.” He stopped and read about it and realized it was something with an attractive design, unfamiliar to most people and, most important, not covered by copyright. Bingo! His next Great Artistic Production begins.
              >>
              >>
              >> I can’t imagine Pepys’ reaction, but I doubt it would be favorable.
              >>
              >>
              >> Dorothy
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Phil Gyford
              http://www.gyford.com/
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