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A NYTimes.com review of PepysDiary.com that I missed - Yay, Phil!

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  • Terry Foreman
    http://tech2.nytimes.com/mem/technology/techreview.html?_r=1&res=9501E1D61131F935A25752C0A9659C8B63&oref=slogin ONLINE DIARY By PAMELA LICALZI O CONNELL
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2006
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      http://tech2.nytimes.com/mem/technology/techreview.html?_r=1&res=9501E1D61131F935A25752C0A9659C8B63&oref=slogin

      ONLINE DIARY

      By PAMELA LICALZI O'CONNELL
      Published: January 16, 2003, Thursday


      [...]

      A new online diary made its debut on Jan. 1. Yes, there are already millions of such personal Web sites. But this diary belongs to Samuel Pepys, who lived from 1633 to 1703, long before ''Weblog'' cracked the lexicon.

      Pepys (pronounced peeps), a British naval administrator, was a compulsive diarist who recorded his life in detail for nine years beginning on New Year's Day 1660. The resulting diary is the most comprehensive personal account of life in the 17th century. The site, The Diary of Samuel Pepys (pepysdiary.com), posts Pepys's entries in a Weblog format as if they had just been written -- a new one is added each day -- with the goal of allowing people to read along for nine years.

      Phil Gyford, a Web developer in London, set up the site because he had always wanted to read the diary but found it ''daunting and uninviting'' in its long form. ''I haven't read much further ahead than what's on the site,'' he said by e-mail. ''I'm enjoying reading it along with everyone else.''
      Mr. Gyford also had the inspired idea of allowing site visitors to annotate the entries. The annotations can be personal comments or explanations proffered for obscure terms and historical references. The result is like reading a book along with a group of clued-in friends.

      Still, Pepys should not be taken as a model by today's online diarists. Although ''Pepys's diary shows us that the smallest of everyday details can be fascinating a few hundred years in the future,'' Mr. Gyford said, ''I wouldn't want to encourage Webloggers to put even more of the details of their lives online.''

      ---------------

      Terry
    • Phil Gyford
      Thanks Terry. Coincidentally, if anyone happens to live in west London, I think Pepys Diary is featured on the back page of the free weekly West London
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2006
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        Thanks Terry.

        Coincidentally, if anyone happens to live in west London, I think
        Pepys' Diary is featured on the back page of the free weekly 'West
        London Informer' that comes out today.

        Phil


        At 10:00 -0500 2006-09-01, Terry Foreman wrote:
        http://tech2.nytimes.com/mem/technology/techreview.html?_r=1&res=9501E1D61131F935A25752C0A9659C8B63&oref=slogin

        ONLINE DIARY

        By PAMELA LICALZI O'CONNELL
        Published: January 16, 2003, Thursday


        [...]

        A new online diary made its debut on Jan. 1. Yes, there are already
        millions of such personal Web sites. But this diary belongs to Samuel
        Pepys, who lived from 1633 to 1703, long before ''Weblog'' cracked
        the lexicon.

        Pepys (pronounced peeps), a British naval administrator, was a
        compulsive diarist who recorded his life in detail for nine years
        beginning on New Year's Day 1660. The resulting diary is the most
        comprehensive personal account of life in the 17th century. The site,
        The Diary of Samuel Pepys (pepysdiary.com), posts Pepys's entries in
        a Weblog format as if they had just been written -- a new one is
        added each day -- with the goal of allowing people to read along for
        nine years.

        Phil Gyford, a Web developer in London, set up the site because he
        had always wanted to read the diary but found it ''daunting and
        uninviting'' in its long form. ''I haven't read much further ahead
        than what's on the site,'' he said by e-mail. ''I'm enjoying reading
        it along with everyone else.''
        Mr. Gyford also had the inspired idea of allowing site visitors to
        annotate the entries. The annotations can be personal comments or
        explanations proffered for obscure terms and historical references.
        The result is like reading a book along with a group of clued-in
        friends.

        Still, Pepys should not be taken as a model by today's online
        diarists. Although ''Pepys's diary shows us that the smallest of
        everyday details can be fascinating a few hundred years in the
        future,'' Mr. Gyford said, ''I wouldn't want to encourage Webloggers
        to put even more of the details of their lives online.''

        ---------------

        Terry



        --
        Phil Gyford
        http://www.gyford.com/
        tel: +44 (0)7866 436847
        aim: philgyford
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