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Inlay Question (long)

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  • Dave Reinhardt
    I m in the process of making a pen that will have a thin ring of inlayed crushed turquoise. I ve done this kind of inlay before, but it s always been a
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm in the process of making a pen that will have a thin ring of inlayed
      crushed turquoise. I've done this kind of inlay before, but it's always been
      a frustrating ordeal, and I was wondering if anyone has tips or tricks to
      make it easier. Here's the simple 20 step process I use now:



      1. Turn blank to final shape
      2. With a parting tool, cut a channel/ring into the blank, making sure
      it is deeper than the size of the inlay material. For thin pens, cutting to
      the tube may be necessary. Turn the lathe off.
      3. If using wood, put a drop of thin CA into the ring & spread it
      around followed by a drop of medium CA to hold the material. If plastic,
      just use medium CA
      4. Take a pinch of the inlay material (be it colored sand, crushed
      turquoise or similar) and try to put it in the ring
      5. Watch most of the inlay material fall directly to the floor, while
      at most 2 grains of the inlay material stick to the tube.
      6. Place a tray or some paper under the blank to catch the falling
      inlay material
      7. By this time, the CA is dry, so add another drop
      8. Place some more inlay material in the ring and try to maneuver it
      around with a tooth pick or dental pick to make sure it covers the tube but
      stays below the edge of the ring (to avoid cutting or sanding the inlay
      material, I want to see nothing but whole grains, not sliced in half grains
      at the top with whole grains underneath)
      9. Decide that the top of the ring that you were able to put the inlay
      material on is ok, but realize that you only have less than a quarter of the
      ring filled.
      10. Rotate the blank to the next area and repeat steps 7 through 9
      11. Realize that there is a big gap between the first section and the
      second section, attempt to fill with and extra grain of sand or two.
      12. Determine that the gap filling grains are sitting way too high and
      will likely be ripped out when you do the final clean up with a skew before
      sanding. Put off doing anything about it till the rest of the inlay is
      done, or address the issue in step 15.
      13. Turn the blank again to get the next section (attempting to repeat
      steps 7 though 9) but realize that the CA collected on the underside of the
      ring while you were trying to fill the top, and now there is not enough room
      to put any of the inlay material.
      14. Attempt to fix this with a file, a dental pick and some careful use
      of acetone, but make a real mess instead of achieving your intent.
      15. Get out the parting tool, turn on the lathe and re-cut the ring so
      that you can start over. Kick yourself for not waiting till all of the CA
      dried before turning on the lathe, and ponder whether or not the tiny bits
      of CA and inlay material now glued to your shirt will be noticeable
      16. Repeat steps 3 through 14 because I'm a slow learner
      17. Repeat steps 3 through 10 enough times to eventually get the inlay
      in place around the circumference of the blank and at the right depth.
      18. Add drops of thick CA to fill in the top of the ring and bring it
      flush with the rest of the blank (turn the blank slowly to keep it even and
      try to let each drop dry before adding the next).
      19. Do a very light clean up cut with a skew to remove excess CA or
      stray bits of inlay material that may have glued themselves to the outside
      of the blank where they don't belong
      20. Sand, polish and assemble the pen, then swear to never attempt this
      stupid stunt again.



      Note that step 8 becomes more difficult with each iteration because the
      dental pick you use to arrange the inlay material becomes encrusted and too
      big to fit inside the ring. Remember to soak it in acetone when you decide
      to take a break rather than smash everything in sight with a sledge hammer.
      While I know this looks like the perfect process, I'm willing to bet someone
      can give me ideas to improve it



      Thanks,

      Dave Reinhardt



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • MICHAEL JUBB
      Dave, you should be a technical author. I can follow those instructions easily. Can t help as I ve never done it, but can t wait for the responses. Mike Dave
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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        Dave, you should be a technical author. I can follow those instructions easily. Can't help as I've never done it, but can't wait for the responses.

        Mike

        Dave Reinhardt <dave.reinhardt@...> wrote:
        I'm in the process of making a pen that will have a thin ring of inlayed
        crushed turquoise. I've done this kind of inlay before, but it's always been
        a frustrating ordeal, and I was wondering if anyone has tips or tricks to
        make it easier. Here's the simple 20 step process I use now:

        1. Turn blank to final shape
        2. With a parting tool, cut a channel/ring into the blank, making sure
        it is deeper than the size of the inlay material. For thin pens, cutting to
        the tube may be necessary. Turn the lathe off.
        3. If using wood, put a drop of thin CA into the ring & spread it
        around followed by a drop of medium CA to hold the material. If plastic,
        just use medium CA
        4. Take a pinch of the inlay material (be it colored sand, crushed
        turquoise or similar) and try to put it in the ring
        5. Watch most of the inlay material fall directly to the floor, while
        at most 2 grains of the inlay material stick to the tube.
        6. Place a tray or some paper under the blank to catch the falling
        inlay material
        7. By this time, the CA is dry, so add another drop
        8. Place some more inlay material in the ring and try to maneuver it
        around with a tooth pick or dental pick to make sure it covers the tube but
        stays below the edge of the ring (to avoid cutting or sanding the inlay
        material, I want to see nothing but whole grains, not sliced in half grains
        at the top with whole grains underneath)
        9. Decide that the top of the ring that you were able to put the inlay
        material on is ok, but realize that you only have less than a quarter of the
        ring filled.
        10. Rotate the blank to the next area and repeat steps 7 through 9
        11. Realize that there is a big gap between the first section and the
        second section, attempt to fill with and extra grain of sand or two.
        12. Determine that the gap filling grains are sitting way too high and
        will likely be ripped out when you do the final clean up with a skew before
        sanding. Put off doing anything about it till the rest of the inlay is
        done, or address the issue in step 15.
        13. Turn the blank again to get the next section (attempting to repeat
        steps 7 though 9) but realize that the CA collected on the underside of the
        ring while you were trying to fill the top, and now there is not enough room
        to put any of the inlay material.
        14. Attempt to fix this with a file, a dental pick and some careful use
        of acetone, but make a real mess instead of achieving your intent.
        15. Get out the parting tool, turn on the lathe and re-cut the ring so
        that you can start over. Kick yourself for not waiting till all of the CA
        dried before turning on the lathe, and ponder whether or not the tiny bits
        of CA and inlay material now glued to your shirt will be noticeable
        16. Repeat steps 3 through 14 because I'm a slow learner
        17. Repeat steps 3 through 10 enough times to eventually get the inlay
        in place around the circumference of the blank and at the right depth.
        18. Add drops of thick CA to fill in the top of the ring and bring it
        flush with the rest of the blank (turn the blank slowly to keep it even and
        try to let each drop dry before adding the next).
        19. Do a very light clean up cut with a skew to remove excess CA or
        stray bits of inlay material that may have glued themselves to the outside
        of the blank where they don't belong
        20. Sand, polish and assemble the pen, then swear to never attempt this
        stupid stunt again.

        Note that step 8 becomes more difficult with each iteration because the
        dental pick you use to arrange the inlay material becomes encrusted and too
        big to fit inside the ring. Remember to soak it in acetone when you decide
        to take a break rather than smash everything in sight with a sledge hammer.
        While I know this looks like the perfect process, I'm willing to bet someone
        can give me ideas to improve it

        Thanks,

        Dave Reinhardt

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Richard Kleinhenz
        I betcha the procedure in the FAQ works every bit as well as yours :-) -- Regards, Rich ======================================== Richard Kleinhenz penturners
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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          I betcha the procedure in the FAQ works every bit as well as yours :-)

          --
          Regards,
          Rich
          ========================================
          Richard Kleinhenz
          penturners moderator
          Keep the group tidy! Delete excess text when quoting!
          http://beautifulhandmadepens.com
          ========================================
        • Adrian
          Good Morning, All. Not being a turner...yet, but being a bit of a creative mad scientist, I thought of the following: Would it be beneficial to 1) score the
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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            Good Morning, All.

            Not being a turner...yet, but being a bit of a creative mad scientist,
            I thought of the following:

            Would it be beneficial to 1) score the square pen blank with a
            tablesaw to create the channel for the inlay material, 2 set the inlay
            material into the square pen blank, 3) create a square mold to put the
            square pen blank into to clamp, putting pressure on all 4 sizes until
            the inlay sets, and 4) turn the square blank - both wood and inlay at
            the same time.

            I could be totally off with this idea.

            Adrian
          • Dave Reinhardt
            Hi Adrian. The key thing I m trying to avoid is turning the inlay material. A lot of the material I use, or plan to use, looks different on the inside then the
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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              Hi Adrian. The key thing I'm trying to avoid is turning the inlay material.
              A lot of the material I use, or plan to use, looks different on the inside
              then the outside. For example, colored sand is normal white/beige on the
              inside of the grains, even if black, brown, or whatever on the outside of
              the grains.

              So I think your process would work, if you weren't worried about the
              differences in cut vs. uncut grains.

              Rich, the process in the FAQ has this same problem

              -----Original Message-----
              From: penturners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Adrian
              Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 7:07 AM
              To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [penturners] Re: Inlay Question (long)

              Good Morning, All.

              Not being a turner...yet, but being a bit of a creative mad scientist,
              I thought of the following:

              Would it be beneficial to 1) score the square pen blank with a
              tablesaw to create the channel for the inlay material, 2 set the inlay
              material into the square pen blank, 3) create a square mold to put the
              square pen blank into to clamp, putting pressure on all 4 sizes until
              the inlay sets, and 4) turn the square blank - both wood and inlay at
              the same time.

              I could be totally off with this idea.

              Adrian
            • John Stevens
              Why don t you use epoxy and mix the two together first (material & epoxy) then place this mixture in the groove? Then just fill in (if needed) with CA, then
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                Why don't you use epoxy and mix the two together first (material & epoxy) then place this mixture in the groove? Then just fill in (if needed) with CA, then turn it down and finish.
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Dave Reinhardt<mailto:dave.reinhardt@...>
                To: penturners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 6:13 AM
                Subject: RE: [penturners] Re: Inlay Question (long)


                Hi Adrian. The key thing I'm trying to avoid is turning the inlay material.
                A lot of the material I use, or plan to use, looks different on the inside
                then the outside. For example, colored sand is normal white/beige on the
                inside of the grains, even if black, brown, or whatever on the outside of
                the grains.

                So I think your process would work, if you weren't worried about the
                differences in cut vs. uncut grains.

                Rich, the process in the FAQ has this same problem

                -----Original Message-----
                From: penturners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com] On
                Behalf Of Adrian
                Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 7:07 AM
                To: penturners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: [penturners] Re: Inlay Question (long)

                Good Morning, All.

                Not being a turner...yet, but being a bit of a creative mad scientist,
                I thought of the following:

                Would it be beneficial to 1) score the square pen blank with a
                tablesaw to create the channel for the inlay material, 2 set the inlay
                material into the square pen blank, 3) create a square mold to put the
                square pen blank into to clamp, putting pressure on all 4 sizes until
                the inlay sets, and 4) turn the square blank - both wood and inlay at
                the same time.

                I could be totally off with this idea.

                Adrian




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                Yahoo! Groups Links





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mark Tetrault
                ... So far so good. ... No need, here is an easier way. Place a paper towel under the pen blank on the lathe ways to catch the excess. Place a small pinch of
                Message 7 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                  On Fri, 1 Jun 2007 09:22:57 +0100 (BST), you wrote:


                  > I'm in the process of making a pen that will have a thin ring of inlayed
                  >crushed turquoise. I've done this kind of inlay before, but it's always been
                  >a frustrating ordeal, and I was wondering if anyone has tips or tricks to
                  >make it easier. Here's the simple 20 step process I use now:
                  >
                  >1. Turn blank to final shape
                  >2. With a parting tool, cut a channel/ring into the blank, making sure
                  >it is deeper than the size of the inlay material. For thin pens, cutting to
                  >the tube may be necessary. Turn the lathe off.

                  So far so good.

                  >3. If using wood, put a drop of thin CA into the ring & spread it
                  >around followed by a drop of medium CA to hold the material. If plastic,
                  >just use medium CA

                  No need, here is an easier way.

                  Place a paper towel under the pen blank on the lathe ways to catch the
                  excess. Place a small pinch of turquoise on the blank (most will fall off
                  but that's OK) and then put a drop of thin CA on it immediately. That will
                  hold the turquoise on the blank. I then hit it with a spray of accelerant.
                  I use an aerosol accelerant from Tower hobbies.
                  Now turn the blank slightly and repeat the procedure. Your drop off will be
                  minimal, it will due to the accelerant set immediately, and as you turn the
                  blank each time there will be no holes to fill afterwards. When yer done,
                  pick up the paper towel and dump the overflow back into your supply
                  container.

                  >4. Take a pinch of the inlay material (be it colored sand, crushed
                  >turquoise or similar) and try to put it in the ring
                  >5. Watch most of the inlay material fall directly to the floor, while
                  >at most 2 grains of the inlay material stick to the tube.
                  >6. Place a tray or some paper under the blank to catch the falling
                  >inlay material
                  >7. By this time, the CA is dry, so add another drop
                  >8. Place some more inlay material in the ring and try to maneuver it
                  >around with a tooth pick or dental pick to make sure it covers the tube but
                  >stays below the edge of the ring (to avoid cutting or sanding the inlay
                  >material, I want to see nothing but whole grains, not sliced in half grains
                  >at the top with whole grains underneath)
                  >9. Decide that the top of the ring that you were able to put the inlay
                  >material on is ok, but realize that you only have less than a quarter of the
                  >ring filled.

                  Using my method above you will avoid all this above^^^^^.

                  >10. Rotate the blank to the next area and repeat steps 7 through 9
                  >11. Realize that there is a big gap between the first section and the
                  >second section, attempt to fill with and extra grain of sand or two.
                  >12. Determine that the gap filling grains are sitting way too high and
                  >will likely be ripped out when you do the final clean up with a skew before
                  >sanding. Put off doing anything about it till the rest of the inlay is
                  >done, or address the issue in step 15.
                  >13. Turn the blank again to get the next section (attempting to repeat
                  >steps 7 though 9) but realize that the CA collected on the underside of the
                  >ring while you were trying to fill the top, and now there is not enough room
                  >to put any of the inlay material.
                  >14. Attempt to fix this with a file, a dental pick and some careful use
                  >of acetone, but make a real mess instead of achieving your intent.


                  All that will not be necessary.


                  >15. Get out the parting tool, turn on the lathe and re-cut the ring so
                  >that you can start over. Kick yourself for not waiting till all of the CA
                  >dried before turning on the lathe, and ponder whether or not the tiny bits
                  >of CA and inlay material now glued to your shirt will be noticeable
                  >16. Repeat steps 3 through 14 because I'm a slow learner
                  >17. Repeat steps 3 through 10 enough times to eventually get the inlay
                  >in place around the circumference of the blank and at the right depth.
                  >18. Add drops of thick CA to fill in the top of the ring and bring it
                  >flush with the rest of the blank (turn the blank slowly to keep it even and
                  >try to let each drop dry before adding the next).

                  By this time I would have given up. LOL ;+}

                  >19. Do a very light clean up cut with a skew to remove excess CA or
                  >stray bits of inlay material that may have glued themselves to the outside
                  >of the blank where they don't belong
                  >20. Sand, polish and assemble the pen, then swear to never attempt this
                  >stupid stunt again.
                  Wow, Time for a cup of coffee.....

                  My inlays turn out perfect with what I have described above. Just go easy
                  on the accelerant as a little will go a long way. Too much leaves an opaque
                  white spot in your inlay. I *always* fill to above the pen surface and then
                  trim back down to the wood. Yes you will have cut pieces on top but you
                  will not notice the difference. The inlay will be smooth and bright.

                  Then finish your pen as you normally would. I use a BLO/CA finish and get
                  beautiful results.

                  For inlays I have used everything AS sells and also different colors of
                  inlace using my method above with very satisfying results. While my work
                  does not approach the mega $$ mark, I have sold many of my inlaid pens for
                  $60+ for cigars and barons.

                  Good luck,

                  Mark
                • Clapper, Randel @ FRE
                  Mark, Do you have any pictures of your inlayed pens or turnings? Randy Clapper Happy To Turn Corners! _____ From: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                    Mark,

                    Do you have any pictures of your inlayed pens or turnings?





                    Randy Clapper

                    Happy To Turn Corners!



                    _____

                    From: penturners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com] On
                    Behalf Of Mark Tetrault
                    Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 10:15 AM
                    To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [penturners] Inlay Question (long)



                    On Fri, 1 Jun 2007 09:22:57 +0100 (BST), you wrote:

                    > I'm in the process of making a pen that will have a thin ring of inlayed
                    >crushed turquoise. I've done this kind of inlay before, but it's always
                    been
                    >a frustrating ordeal, and I was wondering if anyone has tips or tricks to
                    >make it easier. Here's the simple 20 step process I use now:
                    >
                    >1. Turn blank to final shape
                    >2. With a parting tool, cut a channel/ring into the blank, making sure
                    >it is deeper than the size of the inlay material. For thin pens, cutting to
                    >the tube may be necessary. Turn the lathe off.

                    So far so good.

                    >3. If using wood, put a drop of thin CA into the ring & spread it
                    >around followed by a drop of medium CA to hold the material. If plastic,
                    >just use medium CA

                    No need, here is an easier way.

                    Place a paper towel under the pen blank on the lathe ways to catch the
                    excess. Place a small pinch of turquoise on the blank (most will fall off
                    but that's OK) and then put a drop of thin CA on it immediately. That will
                    hold the turquoise on the blank. I then hit it with a spray of accelerant.
                    I use an aerosol accelerant from Tower hobbies.
                    Now turn the blank slightly and repeat the procedure. Your drop off will be
                    minimal, it will due to the accelerant set immediately, and as you turn the
                    blank each time there will be no holes to fill afterwards. When yer done,
                    pick up the paper towel and dump the overflow back into your supply
                    container.

                    >4. Take a pinch of the inlay material (be it colored sand, crushed
                    >turquoise or similar) and try to put it in the ring
                    >5. Watch most of the inlay material fall directly to the floor, while
                    >at most 2 grains of the inlay material stick to the tube.
                    >6. Place a tray or some paper under the blank to catch the falling
                    >inlay material
                    >7. By this time, the CA is dry, so add another drop
                    >8. Place some more inlay material in the ring and try to maneuver it
                    >around with a tooth pick or dental pick to make sure it covers the tube but
                    >stays below the edge of the ring (to avoid cutting or sanding the inlay
                    >material, I want to see nothing but whole grains, not sliced in half grains
                    >at the top with whole grains underneath)
                    >9. Decide that the top of the ring that you were able to put the inlay
                    >material on is ok, but realize that you only have less than a quarter of
                    the
                    >ring filled.

                    Using my method above you will avoid all this above^^^^^.

                    >10. Rotate the blank to the next area and repeat steps 7 through 9
                    >11. Realize that there is a big gap between the first section and the
                    >second section, attempt to fill with and extra grain of sand or two.
                    >12. Determine that the gap filling grains are sitting way too high and
                    >will likely be ripped out when you do the final clean up with a skew before
                    >sanding. Put off doing anything about it till the rest of the inlay is
                    >done, or address the issue in step 15.
                    >13. Turn the blank again to get the next section (attempting to repeat
                    >steps 7 though 9) but realize that the CA collected on the underside of the
                    >ring while you were trying to fill the top, and now there is not enough
                    room
                    >to put any of the inlay material.
                    >14. Attempt to fix this with a file, a dental pick and some careful use
                    >of acetone, but make a real mess instead of achieving your intent.

                    All that will not be necessary.

                    >15. Get out the parting tool, turn on the lathe and re-cut the ring so
                    >that you can start over. Kick yourself for not waiting till all of the CA
                    >dried before turning on the lathe, and ponder whether or not the tiny bits
                    >of CA and inlay material now glued to your shirt will be noticeable
                    >16. Repeat steps 3 through 14 because I'm a slow learner
                    >17. Repeat steps 3 through 10 enough times to eventually get the inlay
                    >in place around the circumference of the blank and at the right depth.
                    >18. Add drops of thick CA to fill in the top of the ring and bring it
                    >flush with the rest of the blank (turn the blank slowly to keep it even and
                    >try to let each drop dry before adding the next).

                    By this time I would have given up. LOL ;+}

                    >19. Do a very light clean up cut with a skew to remove excess CA or
                    >stray bits of inlay material that may have glued themselves to the outside
                    >of the blank where they don't belong
                    >20. Sand, polish and assemble the pen, then swear to never attempt this
                    >stupid stunt again.
                    Wow, Time for a cup of coffee.....

                    My inlays turn out perfect with what I have described above. Just go easy
                    on the accelerant as a little will go a long way. Too much leaves an opaque
                    white spot in your inlay. I *always* fill to above the pen surface and then
                    trim back down to the wood. Yes you will have cut pieces on top but you
                    will not notice the difference. The inlay will be smooth and bright.

                    Then finish your pen as you normally would. I use a BLO/CA finish and get
                    beautiful results.

                    For inlays I have used everything AS sells and also different colors of
                    inlace using my method above with very satisfying results. While my work
                    does not approach the mega $$ mark, I have sold many of my inlaid pens for
                    $60+ for cigars and barons.

                    Good luck,

                    Mark





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Don Ward
                    Try using embossing powder instead. It is available in the scrapbooking area of the popular crafts stores. It is the same color inside as out. I glue it in
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                      Try using embossing powder instead. It is available in the
                      scrapbooking area of the popular crafts stores. It is the same color
                      inside as out. I glue it in with CA and mix it with epoxy.

                      Do a good turn daily!
                      Don
                    • Radman
                      I always put the inlay material first, then a drop of CA to hold it. I build it up higher than the finished pen. When all has dried, I turn the mandrel by
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                        I always put the inlay material first, then a drop of CA to hold it. I build it up higher than the finished pen. When all has dried, I turn the mandrel by hand and use a flat file to bring the inlay close to finished level, and finish up with sandpaper. The filing obviously needs to be done VERY carefully or risk damaging the blank. Head over to YoYoSpin's website... he's got a video tutorial over there you can watch.

                        Tom



                        I'm in the process of making a pen that will have a thin ring of inlayed
                        crushed turquoise. I've done this kind of inlay before, but it's always been
                        a frustrating ordeal, and I was wondering if anyone has tips or tricks to
                        make it easier. Here's the simple 20 step process I use now:

                        1. Turn blank to final shape
                        2. With a parting tool, cut a channel/ring into the blank, making sure
                        it is deeper than the size of the inlay material. For thin pens, cutting to
                        the tube may be necessary. Turn the lathe off.
                        3. If using wood, put a drop of thin CA into the ring & spread it
                        around followed by a drop of medium CA to hold the material. If plastic,
                        just use medium CA
                        4. Take a pinch of the inlay material (be it colored sand, crushed
                        turquoise or similar) and try to put it in the ring
                        5. Watch most of the inlay material fall directly to the floor, while
                        at most 2 grains of the inlay material stick to the tube.
                        6. Place a tray or some paper under the blank to catch the falling
                        inlay material
                        7. By this time, the CA is dry, so add another drop
                        8. Place some more inlay material in the ring and try to maneuver it
                        around with a tooth pick or dental pick to make sure it covers the tube but
                        stays below the edge of the ring (to avoid cutting or sanding the inlay
                        material, I want to see nothing but whole grains, not sliced in half grains
                        at the top with whole grains underneath)
                        9. Decide that the top of the ring that you were able to put the inlay
                        material on is ok, but realize that you only have less than a quarter of the
                        ring filled.
                        10. Rotate the blank to the next area and repeat steps 7 through 9
                        11. Realize that there is a big gap between the first section and the
                        second section, attempt to fill with and extra grain of sand or two.
                        12. Determine that the gap filling grains are sitting way too high and
                        will likely be ripped out when you do the final clean up with a skew before
                        sanding. Put off doing anything about it till the rest of the inlay is
                        done, or address the issue in step 15.
                        13. Turn the blank again to get the next section (attempting to repeat
                        steps 7 though 9) but realize that the CA collected on the underside of the
                        ring while you were trying to fill the top, and now there is not enough room
                        to put any of the inlay material.
                        14. Attempt to fix this with a file, a dental pick and some careful use
                        of acetone, but make a real mess instead of achieving your intent.
                        15. Get out the parting tool, turn on the lathe and re-cut the ring so
                        that you can start over. Kick yourself for not waiting till all of the CA
                        dried before turning on the lathe, and ponder whether or not the tiny bits
                        of CA and inlay material now glued to your shirt will be noticeable
                        16. Repeat steps 3 through 14 because I'm a slow learner
                        17. Repeat steps 3 through 10 enough times to eventually get the inlay
                        in place around the circumference of the blank and at the right depth.
                        18. Add drops of thick CA to fill in the top of the ring and bring it
                        flush with the rest of the blank (turn the blank slowly to keep it even and
                        try to let each drop dry before adding the next).
                        19. Do a very light clean up cut with a skew to remove excess CA or
                        stray bits of inlay material that may have glued themselves to the outside
                        of the blank where they don't belong
                        20. Sand, polish and assemble the pen, then swear to never attempt this
                        stupid stunt again.

                        Note that step 8 becomes more difficult with each iteration because the
                        dental pick you use to arrange the inlay material becomes encrusted and too
                        big to fit inside the ring. Remember to soak it in acetone when you decide
                        to take a break rather than smash everything in sight with a sledge hammer.
                        While I know this looks like the perfect process, I'm willing to bet someone
                        can give me ideas to improve it

                        Thanks,

                        Dave Reinhardt

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • fernburnie70
                        ... inlayed ... always been ... tricks to ... making sure ... cutting to ... plastic, ... crushed ... while ... falling ... maneuver it ... tube but ... inlay
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                          --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Reinhardt"
                          <dave.reinhardt@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I'm in the process of making a pen that will have a thin ring of
                          inlayed
                          > crushed turquoise. I've done this kind of inlay before, but it's
                          always been
                          > a frustrating ordeal, and I was wondering if anyone has tips or
                          tricks to
                          > make it easier. Here's the simple 20 step process I use now:
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > 1. Turn blank to final shape
                          > 2. With a parting tool, cut a channel/ring into the blank,
                          making sure
                          > it is deeper than the size of the inlay material. For thin pens,
                          cutting to
                          > the tube may be necessary. Turn the lathe off.
                          > 3. If using wood, put a drop of thin CA into the ring & spread it
                          > around followed by a drop of medium CA to hold the material. If
                          plastic,
                          > just use medium CA
                          > 4. Take a pinch of the inlay material (be it colored sand,
                          crushed
                          > turquoise or similar) and try to put it in the ring
                          > 5. Watch most of the inlay material fall directly to the floor,
                          while
                          > at most 2 grains of the inlay material stick to the tube.
                          > 6. Place a tray or some paper under the blank to catch the
                          falling
                          > inlay material
                          > 7. By this time, the CA is dry, so add another drop
                          > 8. Place some more inlay material in the ring and try to
                          maneuver it
                          > around with a tooth pick or dental pick to make sure it covers the
                          tube but
                          > stays below the edge of the ring (to avoid cutting or sanding the
                          inlay
                          > material, I want to see nothing but whole grains, not sliced in
                          half grains
                          > at the top with whole grains underneath)
                          > 9. Decide that the top of the ring that you were able to put the
                          inlay
                          > material on is ok, but realize that you only have less than a
                          quarter of the
                          > ring filled.
                          > 10. Rotate the blank to the next area and repeat steps 7 through 9
                          > 11. Realize that there is a big gap between the first section and
                          the
                          > second section, attempt to fill with and extra grain of sand or two.
                          > 12. Determine that the gap filling grains are sitting way too
                          high and
                          > will likely be ripped out when you do the final clean up with a
                          skew before
                          > sanding. Put off doing anything about it till the rest of the
                          inlay is
                          > done, or address the issue in step 15.
                          > 13. Turn the blank again to get the next section (attempting to
                          repeat
                          > steps 7 though 9) but realize that the CA collected on the
                          underside of the
                          > ring while you were trying to fill the top, and now there is not
                          enough room
                          > to put any of the inlay material.
                          > 14. Attempt to fix this with a file, a dental pick and some
                          careful use
                          > of acetone, but make a real mess instead of achieving your intent.
                          > 15. Get out the parting tool, turn on the lathe and re-cut the
                          ring so
                          > that you can start over. Kick yourself for not waiting till all of
                          the CA
                          > dried before turning on the lathe, and ponder whether or not the
                          tiny bits
                          > of CA and inlay material now glued to your shirt will be noticeable
                          > 16. Repeat steps 3 through 14 because I'm a slow learner
                          > 17. Repeat steps 3 through 10 enough times to eventually get the
                          inlay
                          > in place around the circumference of the blank and at the right
                          depth.
                          > 18. Add drops of thick CA to fill in the top of the ring and
                          bring it
                          > flush with the rest of the blank (turn the blank slowly to keep it
                          even and
                          > try to let each drop dry before adding the next).
                          > 19. Do a very light clean up cut with a skew to remove excess CA
                          or
                          > stray bits of inlay material that may have glued themselves to the
                          outside
                          > of the blank where they don't belong
                          > 20. Sand, polish and assemble the pen, then swear to never
                          attempt this
                          > stupid stunt again.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Note that step 8 becomes more difficult with each iteration because
                          the
                          > dental pick you use to arrange the inlay material becomes encrusted
                          and too
                          > big to fit inside the ring. Remember to soak it in acetone when
                          you decide
                          > to take a break rather than smash everything in sight with a sledge
                          hammer.
                          > While I know this looks like the perfect process, I'm willing to
                          bet someone
                          > can give me ideas to improve it
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Thanks,
                          >
                          > Dave Reinhardt
                          >
                          > Dave-
                          Thanks for one of the most amusing e-mails I've read in a
                          long time. I'm still laughing as I post this

                          Bill Cookerly in Glen Burnie, Md.>
                        • Adrian
                          Hi, Dave. ... So, let s modify the shape of the mold - from square for a square pen blank to round for a turned blank. Is it possible to turn a cylinder larger
                          Message 12 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                            Hi, Dave.

                            > The key thing I'm trying to avoid is turning the inlay material.

                            So, let's modify the shape of the mold - from square for a square pen
                            blank to round for a turned blank. Is it possible to turn a cylinder
                            larger than the diameter of the pen about the same length of the pen,
                            then hollow out the inside of the cylinder to match the diameter of
                            the pen.

                            If possible, how about cutting the hollowed cylinder in half and clamp
                            it around the pen and inlay with a number of rubber bands? The inside
                            of the mold would have to have some silicone or similar lubricant to
                            prevent it from sticking to the adhesive for the inlay.

                            Yes, I am a mad scientist at heart.

                            Adrian
                          • Bruce Hollis
                            My thoughts would be to make a out of 2 tubes the inside diameter and outside diameter of what you wish to end up with and the do the CA pour the crystals.
                            Message 13 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                              My thoughts would be to make a out of 2 tubes the inside diameter and outside diameter of what you wish to end up with and the do the CA pour the crystals. That way it would be smooth but grain showing on the outside. Shape wood the way you want it without gluing in the tubes and treat the sand ring just like a regular ring with the wood and assemble the pen. Yes there are sprays that on a "mold so the CA won't stick to the "mold".

                              Thanks,
                              Bruce in Florida


                              ----- Original Message ----
                              From: Dave Reinhardt <dave.reinhardt@...>
                              To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, June 1, 2007 9:13:00 AM
                              Subject: RE: [penturners] Re: Inlay Question (long)

                              Hi Adrian. The key thing I'm trying to avoid is turning the inlay material.
                              A lot of the material I use, or plan to use, looks different on the inside
                              then the outside. For example, colored sand is normal white/beige on the
                              inside of the grains, even if black, brown, or whatever on the outside of
                              the grains.

                              So I think your process would work, if you weren't worried about the
                              differences in cut vs. uncut grains.

                              Rich, the process in the FAQ has this same problem

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: penturners@yahoogro ups.com [mailto:penturners@yahoogro ups.com] On
                              Behalf Of Adrian
                              Sent: Friday, June 01, 2007 7:07 AM
                              To: penturners@yahoogro ups.com
                              Subject: [penturners] Re: Inlay Question (long)

                              Good Morning, All.

                              Not being a turner...yet, but being a bit of a creative mad scientist,
                              I thought of the following:

                              Would it be beneficial to 1) score the square pen blank with a
                              tablesaw to create the channel for the inlay material, 2 set the inlay
                              material into the square pen blank, 3) create a square mold to put the
                              square pen blank into to clamp, putting pressure on all 4 sizes until
                              the inlay sets, and 4) turn the square blank - both wood and inlay at
                              the same time.

                              I could be totally off with this idea.

                              Adrian







                              ____________________________________________________________________________________
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                              that gives answers, not web links.
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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Mark Tetrault
                              ... Unfortunately no. Lemme see if I can take one tomorrow and post it on the pen turner site. Mark
                              Message 14 of 15 , Jun 1, 2007
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                                On Fri, 1 Jun 2007 10:21:07 -0400, you wrote:

                                > Mark,
                                >
                                >Do you have any pictures of your inlayed pens or turnings?
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >Randy Clapper
                                >
                                >Happy To Turn Corners!

                                Unfortunately no. Lemme see if I can take one tomorrow and post it on the
                                pen turner site.

                                Mark
                              • Jim Armstrong
                                Mix the crush stone and Medium CA glue into a thick paste and then apply to the grove while slowly turning the blank. Let dry and with the lathe on sand with
                                Message 15 of 15 , Jun 3, 2007
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                                  Mix the crush stone and Medium CA glue into a thick paste and then apply to
                                  the grove while slowly turning the blank. Let dry and with the lathe on
                                  sand with 80 grit.

                                  Jim


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