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Re: Considering going wholesale

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  • rodkeen@sbcglobal.net
    Jerry stated the case very well.  Selling your craft at wholesale simply cheapens your work. What we do is art.  Each pen is a unique, handcrafted,
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 1, 2013
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      Jerry stated the case very well.  Selling your craft at wholesale simply cheapens your work. What we do is art.  Each pen is a unique, handcrafted, one-of-a-kind, piece of art.  You can promote your work through various channels without devaluing your craft.  I have found that word of mouth goes a long way in developing sales.  However, I don't believe that in this age of mass-produced, foreign made junk, that true craftsmanship is not held in the same regard that it should be.  It is extremely rare for a good craftsman to make a living at his/her trade.  Having said all that, I believe we should just enjoy our hobby.  And, if we are blessed enough to make back a portion of our investment we should be content.  This is just my opinion.  However, if you are intent on selling wholesale, I wish you well and hope that you find the success you desire.
      In Him,
      Rod
    • Stephen Robinson
      Special Orders, and gifts... that s about the only ones that I make.  Since I hurt my shoulder, in August, I ve not turned any pens.  I need to turn about
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 1, 2013
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        Special Orders, and gifts... that's about the only ones that I make.  Since I hurt my shoulder, in August, I've not turned any pens.  I need to turn about ten to catch up to what I need to have done.  I had a guy want me to make him several for him to give to his groomsmen who served at his wedding, but I was unable to.  Perhaps, now that I'm back into doing some small things about the house, gaining more mobility in my shoulder, I can sneak back and do an order or so and get some for gifts.  Got graduation coming up in a few months.  
        Its truly a great hobby, and you'll impress your friends when you hand them one of your pieces.  THey will cherish it, because it was made by hand.  At least the wood or plastic/acrylic/antler part of it. 
         
        Steve in MO

        --- On Tue, 1/1/13, rodkeen@... <rodkeen@...> wrote:

        From: rodkeen@... <rodkeen@...>
        Subject: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale
        To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, January 1, 2013, 9:02 AM

         
        Jerry stated the case very well.  Selling your craft at wholesale simply cheapens your work. What we do is art.  Each pen is a unique, handcrafted, one-of-a-kind, piece of art.  You can promote your work through various channels without devaluing your craft.  I have found that word of mouth goes a long way in developing sales.  However, I don't believe that in this age of mass-produced, foreign made junk, that true craftsmanship is not held in the same regard that it should be.  It is extremely rare for a good craftsman to make a living at his/her trade.  Having said all that, I believe we should just enjoy our hobby.  And, if we are blessed enough to make back a portion of our investment we should be content.  This is just my opinion.  However, if you are intent on selling wholesale, I wish you well and hope that you find the success you desire.
        In Him,
        Rod
      • Patrick Driscoll
        I make Slimline pens and give them away for any little favor someone does for me. If a clerk goes out of their way to help me find something instead of just
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 1, 2013
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          I make Slimline pens and give them away for any little favor someone does for me. If a clerk goes out of their way to help me find something instead of just pointing to an aisle and saying"over there", I'll give them a pen and a business card. So far I have gotten enough orders from people that liked my pens, that I can afford to keep making them and giving them away.
             I buy my pen parts from Woodturningz and buy 50 at a time so the price is low enough that it doesn't hurt to give them away. The wood I use is from local trees and discarded bed and furniture parts found behind local thrift stores, (Vermont Maple, Walnut, and other good woods). I  also scored a buy from Forest Products, that is made up of 3' to 4' long by 1" to 2 1/2" square. If I were to stack the wood in a square pile, it would be about 2 1/2 feet square. I got it all for $25, and there are all kinds of good hardwoods in it.
          Patrick Driscoll
          Saint Paul, MN
          patrick36@...
          www.pensbypat.com
          If you can read this, Thank a teacher
          If you are reading this in English, thank a veteran
        • Lyell
          Not to rain on your parade, but, I would check with your tax advisor before you try to take a $350 tax deduction on an item with a basis(cost to you) of only
          Message 4 of 17 , Jan 1, 2013
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            Not to rain on your parade, but, I would check with your tax advisor before you try to take a $350 tax deduction on an item with a basis(cost to you) of only $40. Also remember that you can only take a tax deduction for your donation if you have enough other deductions to itemize using schedule A. For a married couple that means you need over $11,000 in other deductions.


            --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, "woodshaver" <jerryhill17@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Just jumping in on the wholesale idea... I tried that and it takes the fun out of making pens in my opinion. When you sell retail, you are really not making much money to begin with if you add all the cost. Add the light bill, heat bill, sandpaper, glue, and wood, tools, the kit, and then some time... you end up working for $4 per hour. Now sell them at whole sale, and the retailer wants to mark them up 100% to make money, and now there is a middle man involved between you and the customer. If something happens to the pen, the customer complains to the retailer. Now you have to deal with the retailer and the customer. If you were going to make money on a slimline, you have to sell at $30 bucks and the retailer has to get $60. Also remember uncle sam which we have not talked about.
            > Now I have turned pens for about 5 years and have turned about 2000 pens. If you want to have fun and make some money, you have to start marketing yourself to people who like art, make yourself available to people who want that "special" gift made for someone special and dont mind paying for it.. or give them away. Yes, I said GIVE AWAY as in free. But.. give them to a charity for auction. A charity who has big donors showing up to give money anyway. You can make a nice pen like a JR STATESMAN from Craft Supply and you will have 40 bucks in it. You donate it, it auctions for $350 and you take a tax deduction for the 350 as charity. You make more doing that. I also make pens for "big shots". I just made 10 Jr Statesman pens for the our governor for $150 per pen for gifts. Not trying to rain on your parade, but I have tried all angles for making money on pens just to recoup some money invested, but outside of going to craft fairs, flee markets, or local craft shows, the money is hard to make, and I will not mass produce my art to sell at a craft show. Good luck.
            > --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, zarb1@ wrote:
            > >
            > > Most pen suppliers sell pen displays. I bought a 12 pen fan display from my favourite supplier, but Penn State and others have the same display for about $22.
            > >
            > > I also bought a nice clear acrylic display that is used for single capped pens like the Canadiana/Roman fountain pen.
            > >
            > > Leland
            > > Sent from my BlackBerry® powered by Virgin Mobile.
            > >
            > > -----Original Message-----
            > > From: "designerpens" <designerpens@>
            > > Sender: penturners@yahoogroups.com
            > > Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2012 18:25:11
            > > To: <penturners@yahoogroups.com>
            > > Reply-To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
            > > Subject: [penturners] Considering going wholesale
            > >
            > > ...and looking for nice display trays that I could provide for a retailer. A tray that would hold 10 or 12 pens and has some kind of spot or tab for a label that would be used to show the material used for the pen
            > >
            > > any ideas?
            > >
            > > thanks
            > >
            >
          • jerryhill17
            Lyell, I checked with my accountant last year. She said it was no different than giving stock away. You write off not what you paid for it, but what it selling
            Message 5 of 17 , Jan 1, 2013
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              Lyell, I checked with my accountant last year. She said it was no different than giving stock away. You write off not what you paid for it, but what it selling for at the time of the gift. I gave some coke stock to my church that I had 30 per share in, but was able to take a deduction of 78 because that is what the church sold it for. If I give a pen away to charity, and I have 30 in it, I can only write off the 30. But if I give it to charity to be sold, and it sells for 300, then I can take the 300. That is what she said anyway, and I did double check that with another accountant friend. Hope they are both right!!!


              From: Lyell <anselhalfelf@...>
              To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tue, January 1, 2013 1:44:01 PM
              Subject: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale

              Not to rain on your parade, but, I would check with your tax advisor before you try to take a $350 tax deduction on an item with a basis(cost to you) of only $40. Also remember that you can only take a tax deduction for your donation if you have enough other deductions to itemize using schedule A. For a married couple that means you need over $11,000 in other deductions.


              --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, "woodshaver" <jerryhill17@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Just jumping in on the wholesale idea... I tried that and it takes the fun out of making pens in my opinion. When you sell retail, you are really not making much money to begin with if you add all the cost. Add the light bill, heat bill, sandpaper, glue, and wood, tools, the kit, and then some time... you end up working for $4 per hour. Now sell them at whole sale, and the retailer wants to mark them up 100% to make money, and now there is a middle man involved between you and the customer. If something happens to the pen, the customer complains to the retailer. Now you have to deal with the retailer and the customer. If you were going to make money on a slimline, you have to sell at $30 bucks and the retailer has to get $60. Also remember uncle sam which we have not talked about.
              > Now I have turned pens for about 5 years and have turned about 2000 pens. If you want to have fun and make some
              money, you have to start marketing yourself to people who like art, make yourself available to people who want that "special" gift made for someone special and dont mind paying for it.. or give them away. Yes, I said GIVE AWAY as in free. But.. give them to a charity for auction. A charity who has big donors showing up to give money anyway. You can make a nice pen like a JR STATESMAN from Craft Supply and you will have 40 bucks in it. You donate it, it auctions for $350 and you take a tax deduction for the 350 as charity. You make more doing that. I also make pens for "big shots". I just made 10 Jr Statesman pens for the our governor for $150 per pen for gifts. Not trying to rain on your parade, but I have tried all angles for making money on pens just to recoup some money invested, but outside of going to craft fairs, flee markets, or local craft shows, the money is hard to make, and I will not mass produce my art to sell at a craft show. Good luck. 
              > --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, zarb1@ wrote:
              > >
              > > Most pen suppliers sell pen displays. I bought a 12 pen fan display from my favourite supplier, but Penn State and others have the same display for about $22.
              > >
              > > I also bought a nice clear acrylic display that is used for single capped pens like the Canadiana/Roman fountain pen.
              > >
              > > Leland
              > > Sent from my BlackBerry® powered by Virgin Mobile.
              > >
              > > -----Original Message-----
              > > From: "designerpens" <designerpens@>
              > > Sender: penturners@yahoogroups.com
              > > Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2012 18:25:11
              > > To: <
              href="mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com">penturners@yahoogroups.com>
              > > Reply-To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
              > > Subject: [penturners] Considering going wholesale
              > >
              > > ...and looking for nice display trays that I could provide for a retailer. A tray that would hold 10 or 12 pens and has some kind of spot or tab for a label that would be used  to show the material used for the pen
              > >
              > > any ideas?
              > >
              > > thanks
              > >
              >




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            • designerpens
              thank you for all of the input. Rather that rain on my parade, I consider this as valuable feedback from others who love this hobby as much as I do.
              Message 6 of 17 , Jan 1, 2013
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                thank you for all of the input. Rather that rain on my parade, I consider this as valuable feedback from others who love this hobby as much as I do.

                --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, "Lyell" <anselhalfelf@...> wrote:
                >
                > Not to rain on your parade,
              • zarb1@yahoo.com
                Figured I d throw my 2 cents in, albeit late. I have been looking at putting my pens in some retail stores, but I choose high-end gift shops and our local
                Message 7 of 17 , Jan 2, 2013
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                  Figured I'd throw my 2 cents in, albeit late.

                  I have been looking at putting my pens in some retail stores, but I choose high-end gift shops and our local crafters outlet that displays and sells for local artisans. Just to get your goods into the crafters store, your work has to be "juried" and accepted as of high enough quality to display.

                  As for "wholesale", one mistake many crafters make is under valuing their work. They often overlook overhead items like electricity, tool wear, upgrades, repairs on equipment, wastage (ruined blanks or parts), fuel, vehicle repairs, etc. That are part of running a small business.

                  Another mistake is thinking that making $10 on a pen is good. If it takes you an hour to make the pen and it is a cheap slimline with a $1 blank, then taking everything into account, you are probably breaking even, but, if it is a nice pen like an Atrax fountain or a Roman rollerball with an M3 blank, then you might as well give it away, because that is a pen you should be making good money on.

                  So, if you are charging enough to begin with, you can give retailers a discount and still make good money at it. Also remember a retailer isn't going to be happy if you are selling pens substantially less than they are.

                  I learned a bit about price when I made my first fountain pen. It was for my brother who had lost 2 Montblancs. Since it was my brother, I naturally did it for material cost, but figured, if I sold it, I'd charge $160. Thinking that sounded expensive I looked up the pens he lost/had stolen. One was $700, the other was $1200. Both were production line pens made with "special resin"(I figure this means expensive plastic. lol).

                  The one I made him gets every bit as much attention and has received comments about being "a nice Montblanc", so I am not out of line in my pricing.

                  If the quality is there, people will pay for it, especially if it is unique, so don't sell yourself short.


                  Leland
                  Cresswell Pens
                  Sent from my BlackBerry® powered by Virgin Mobile.

                  From: "Patrick Driscoll" <patrick36@...>
                  Sender: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2013 10:23:12 -0600 (CST)
                  To: <penturners@yahoogroups.com>
                  ReplyTo: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale

                   

                  

                  I make Slimline pens and give them away for any little favor someone does for me. If a clerk goes out of their way to help me find something instead of just pointing to an aisle and saying"over there", I'll give them a pen and a business card. So far I have gotten enough orders from people that liked my pens, that I can afford to keep making them and giving them away.
                     I buy my pen parts from Woodturningz and buy 50 at a time so the price is low enough that it doesn't hurt to give them away. The wood I use is from local trees and discarded bed and furniture parts found behind local thrift stores, (Vermont Maple, Walnut, and other good woods). I  also scored a buy from Forest Products, that is made up of 3' to 4' long by 1" to 2 1/2" square. If I were to stack the wood in a square pile, it would be about 2 1/2 feet square. I got it all for $25, and there are all kinds of good hardwoods in it.
                  Patrick Driscoll
                  Saint Paul, MN
                  patrick36@...
                  www.pensbypat.com
                  If you can read this, Thank a teacher
                  If you are reading this in English, thank a veteran
                • Biglt
                  Rod, It seems you do not have even the most basic understanding of how the art market works. Having been a fine art printmaker (hand printing etchings,
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jan 2, 2013
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                    Rod,
                    It seems you do not have even the most basic understanding of how the "art" market works. Having been a fine art printmaker (hand printing etchings, engravings, lithographs, serigraphs, etc.) for more than 35 years, (not to mention gallery and frameshop owner) I understand the art market. When I began selling what I was turning, I factored in the possibility of someday selling at wholesale, thus avoiding the mistakes I have witnessed countless artists make. From day one of selling, I have been prepared to give discounts to people who buy from me wholesale. being ever mindful that "wholesale" means "whole lot sale." In other words, they need to buy signifcant quantities to get a price break.

                    When you are selling at, say, craft fairs, you are wearing many hats (artist, manufacturer, financier, wholesaler, retailer, etc.), ALL of which must reap some financial reward for your business to go forward. This is business 101. Once you acknowledge this basic premise, and price acordingly, you will find you can make MORE money wholesaling, as long as you are realistic as to your artist/manufacturing costs, plus profit. Unfortunately, many woodturners make most - if not all - of their money from being a retailer, and short the other "hats."

                    When you wholesale to others, you simply give them the portion of the procceeds that their "hats" deserve. Far from cheapening your work, it increases your exposure, and along with it YOUR worth - giving you more time to "make." . Everyone MUST make money (especially you) in the process for it to succeed.

                    In FSM,

                    Larry



                    --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, rodkeen@... wrote:
                    >
                    > Jerry stated the case very well.  Selling your craft at wholesale simply cheapens your work. What we do is art.  Each pen is a unique, handcrafted, one-of-a-kind, piece of art.  You can promote your work through various channels without devaluing your craft.  I have found that word of mouth goes a long way in developing sales.  However, I don't believe that in this age of mass-produced, foreign made junk, that true craftsmanship is not held in the same regard that it should be.  It is extremely rare for a good craftsman to make a living at his/her trade.  Having said all that, I believe we should just enjoy our hobby.  And, if we are blessed enough to make back a portion of our investment we should be content.  This is just my opinion.  However, if you are intent on selling wholesale, I wish you well and hope that you find the success you desire.In Him,Rod
                    >
                  • Lyell
                    You are right about your stock. That is how it works for capital gains property like stocks or real estate purchased pieces of art and collect ables. However,
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jan 2, 2013
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                      You are right about your stock. That is how it works for capital gains property like stocks or real estate purchased pieces of art and collect ables. However, that is not how it works for ordinary income items such as inventory or works of art created by the artist.

                      Check page 11 http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p526.pdf

                      I am not trying to be argumentative or trying to cause any trouble. Just the opposite, I am just trying to point out potential pitfalls in the event of an audit. I am not an accountant so, you can take this for what it is worth. That is a well intentioned note of caution.

                      Lyell

                      --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, jerryhill17 <jerryhill17@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Lyell, I checked with my accountant last year. She said it was no different than
                      > giving stock away. You write off not what you paid for it, but what it selling
                      > for at the time of the gift. I gave some coke stock to my church that I had 30
                      > per share in, but was able to take a deduction of 78 because that is what the
                      > church sold it for. If I give a pen away to charity, and I have 30 in it, I can
                      > only write off the 30. But if I give it to charity to be sold, and it sells for
                      > 300, then I can take the 300. That is what she said anyway, and I did double
                      > check that with another accountant friend. Hope they are both right!!!
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ________________________________
                      > From: Lyell <anselhalfelf@...>
                      > To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Tue, January 1, 2013 1:44:01 PM
                      > Subject: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale
                      >
                      > Not to rain on your parade, but, I would check with your tax advisor before you
                      > try to take a $350 tax deduction on an item with a basis(cost to you) of only
                      > $40. Also remember that you can only take a tax deduction for your donation if
                      > you have enough other deductions to itemize using schedule A. For a married
                      > couple that means you need over $11,000 in other deductions.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In penturners@yahoogroups.com, "woodshaver" <jerryhill17@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Just jumping in on the wholesale idea... I tried that and it takes the fun out
                      > >of making pens in my opinion. When you sell retail, you are really not making
                      > >much money to begin with if you add all the cost. Add the light bill, heat bill,
                      > >sandpaper, glue, and wood, tools, the kit, and then some time... you end up
                      > >working for $4 per hour. Now sell them at whole sale, and the retailer wants to
                      > >mark them up 100% to make money, and now there is a middle man involved between
                      > >you and the customer. If something happens to the pen, the customer complains to
                      > >the retailer. Now you have to deal with the retailer and the customer. If you
                      > >were going to make money on a slimline, you have to sell at $30 bucks and the
                      > >retailer has to get $60. Also remember uncle sam which we have not talked about.
                      > >
                      > > Now I have turned pens for about 5 years and have turned about 2000 pens. If
                      > >you want to have fun and make some money, you have to start marketing yourself
                      > >to people who like art, make yourself available to people who want that
                      > >"special" gift made for someone special and dont mind paying for it.. or give
                      > >them away. Yes, I said GIVE AWAY as in free. But.. give them to a charity for
                      > >auction. A charity who has big donors showing up to give money anyway. You can
                      > >make a nice pen like a JR STATESMAN from Craft Supply and you will have 40 bucks
                      > >in it. You donate it, it auctions for $350 and you take a tax deduction for the
                      > >350 as charity. You make more doing that. I also make pens for "big shots". I
                      > >just made 10 Jr Statesman pens for the our governor for $150 per pen for gifts.
                      > >Not trying to rain on your parade, but I have tried all angles for making money
                      > >on pens just to recoup some money invested, but outside of going to craft fairs,
                      > >flee markets, or local craft shows, the money is hard to make, and I will not
                      > >mass produce my art to sell at a craft show. Good luck.
                    • bill alexander
                      Very well put Rod.     Bill ________________________________ From: rodkeen@sbcglobal.net To: penturners@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                      Message 10 of 17 , Feb 6, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Very well put Rod.     Bill


                        From: "rodkeen@..." <rodkeen@...>
                        To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Tuesday, January 1, 2013 7:02 AM
                        Subject: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale

                         
                        Jerry stated the case very well.  Selling your craft at wholesale simply cheapens your work. What we do is art.  Each pen is a unique, handcrafted, one-of-a-kind, piece of art.  You can promote your work through various channels without devaluing your craft.  I have found that word of mouth goes a long way in developing sales.  However, I don't believe that in this age of mass-produced, foreign made junk, that true craftsmanship is not held in the same regard that it should be.  It is extremely rare for a good craftsman to make a living at his/her trade.  Having said all that, I believe we should just enjoy our hobby.  And, if we are blessed enough to make back a portion of our investment we should be content.  This is just my opinion.  However, if you are intent on selling wholesale, I wish you well and hope that you find the success you desire.
                        In Him,
                        Rod


                      • Stephen Robinson
                        I don t want to go big... I do as many as I want to do... It s a HOBBY for me, not a business.  If I recoup some $$ on some of my work, that s so much the
                        Message 11 of 17 , Feb 6, 2013
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                          I don't want to go big... I do as many as I want to do... It's a HOBBY for me, not a business.  If I recoup some $$ on some of my work, that's so much the better... for instance, a special order.... but, I really enjoy handing a HS graduate, or a college graduate, a pen for their graduation....  THey are so very appreciative...
                           
                          Steve in MO

                          --- On Wed, 2/6/13, bill alexander <billfishalex@...> wrote:

                          From: bill alexander <billfishalex@...>
                          Subject: Re: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale
                          To: "penturners@yahoogroups.com" <penturners@yahoogroups.com>
                          Date: Wednesday, February 6, 2013, 10:05 PM

                           
                          Very well put Rod.     Bill


                          From: "rodkeen@..." <rodkeen@...>
                          To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Tuesday, January 1, 2013 7:02 AM
                          Subject: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale

                           
                          Jerry stated the case very well.  Selling your craft at wholesale simply cheapens your work. What we do is art.  Each pen is a unique, handcrafted, one-of-a-kind, piece of art.  You can promote your work through various channels without devaluing your craft.  I have found that word of mouth goes a long way in developing sales.  However, I don't believe that in this age of mass-produced, foreign made junk, that true craftsmanship is not held in the same regard that it should be.  It is extremely rare for a good craftsman to make a living at his/her trade.  Having said all that, I believe we should just enjoy our hobby.  And, if we are blessed enough to make back a portion of our investment we should be content.  This is just my opinion.  However, if you are intent on selling wholesale, I wish you well and hope that you find the success you desire.
                          In Him,
                          Rod


                        • Weiberg Ted
                          I was once told that I need to enjoy what I do as a hobby, because the minute I try to make a profit what I do becomes a business, and a burden. Decide what
                          Message 12 of 17 , Feb 7, 2013
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                            I was once told that I need to enjoy what I do as a hobby, because the minute I try to make a profit what I do becomes a business, and a burden. Decide what your real enjoyment is and go for that goal. If you want to make money your goals may not be aligned with your true desires. The joy of wood turning and woodworking as an Art, or as a Business. Artist's, whether their media is paint, welding metal, wood do it for the love of creation of something.

                            From: bill alexander <billfishalex@...>
                            To: "penturners@yahoogroups.com" <penturners@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 10:05 PM
                            Subject: Re: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale
                             
                            Very well put Rod.     Bill

                            From: "rodkeen@..." <rodkeen@...>
                            To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Tuesday, January 1, 2013 7:02 AM
                            Subject: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale
                             
                            Jerry stated the case very well.  Selling your craft at wholesale simply cheapens your work. What we do is art.  Each pen is a unique, handcrafted, one-of-a-kind, piece of art.  You can promote your work through various channels without devaluing your craft.  I have found that word of mouth goes a long way in developing sales.  However, I don't believe that in this age of mass-produced, foreign made junk, that true craftsmanship is not held in the same regard that it should be.  It is extremely rare for a good craftsman to make a living at his/her trade.  Having said all that, I believe we should just enjoy our hobby.  And, if we are blessed enough to make back a portion of our investment we should be content.  This is just my opinion.  However, if you are intent on selling wholesale, I wish you well and hope that you find the success you desire.
                            In Him,
                            Rod
                          • Clapper, Randel @ FRE
                            Quote of the Day: Do what you feel in your heart to be right – for you’ll be criticized anyway. ~Eleanor Roosevelt Reflection of the Day: Sometimes you
                            Message 13 of 17 , Feb 7, 2013
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                              Quote of the Day:

                              Do what you feel in your heart to be right – for you’ll be criticized anyway. ~Eleanor Roosevelt

                               

                              Reflection of the Day:

                              Sometimes you stand alone on an issue.  But if you know deep down it is truly right, then you will prevail. 

                               

                               

                              Randy Clapper
                              Happy to Turn Corners

                              In GOD I Trust
                              I would rather live my life as if there is a God and die to find out there isn't, then to live my life as if there is no God and die to find out there is.

                              Practice random kindness and commit senseless acts of beauty.

                               

                              From: penturners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Weiberg Ted
                              Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2013 9:39 AM
                              To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale

                               

                               

                              I was once told that I need to enjoy what I do as a hobby, because the minute I try to make a profit what I do becomes a business, and a burden. Decide what your real enjoyment is and go for that goal. If you want to make money your goals may not be aligned with your true desires. The joy of wood turning and woodworking as an Art, or as a Business. Artist's, whether their media is paint, welding metal, wood do it for the love of creation of something.

                               

                            • Weiberg Ted
                              Well said. ________________________________ From: Clapper, Randel @ FRE To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                              Message 14 of 17 , Feb 7, 2013
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                                Well said.

                                From: "Clapper, Randel @ FRE" <clapper.r@...>
                                To: "penturners@yahoogroups.com" <penturners@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Thursday, February 7, 2013 8:49 AM
                                Subject: RE: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale
                                 
                                Quote of the Day:
                                Do what you feel in your heart to be right – for you’ll be criticized anyway. ~Eleanor Roosevelt
                                 
                                Reflection of the Day:
                                Sometimes you stand alone on an issue.  But if you know deep down it is truly right, then you will prevail. 
                                 
                                 
                                Randy Clapper
                                Happy to Turn Corners
                                In GOD I Trust
                                I would rather live my life as if there is a God and die to find out there isn't, then to live my life as if there is no God and die to find out there is.
                                Practice random kindness and commit senseless acts of beauty.
                                 
                                From: penturners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:penturners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Weiberg Ted
                                Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2013 9:39 AM
                                To: penturners@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [penturners] Re: Considering going wholesale
                                 
                                 
                                I was once told that I need to enjoy what I do as a hobby, because the minute I try to make a profit what I do becomes a business, and a burden. Decide what your real enjoyment is and go for that goal. If you want to make money your goals may not be aligned with your true desires. The joy of wood turning and woodworking as an Art, or as a Business. Artist's, whether their media is paint, welding metal, wood do it for the love of creation of something.
                                 
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