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letter to Pat Toomey

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  • Lois
    Today I faxed this letter to Senator Toomey: Senator Pat Toomey 502 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-4254 Fax: (202)
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3, 2011
      Today I faxed this letter to Senator Toomey:

      Senator Pat Toomey
      502 Hart Senate Office Building
      Washington, D.C. 20510
      Phone: (202) 224-4254
      Fax: (202) 228-0284

      August 3, 2011

      Re: entitlement reform

      Dear Senator Toomey,

      I saw you speaking about the debt ceiling deal on Greta Van Susteren's show last night. I noticed you did not mention the urgent need for entitlement reform when you spoke about how the bill didn't go far enough in cutting government spending. I am writing to urge you to support substantive reforms to the Social Security and Medicare programs.

      We should raise the retirement age for Social Security eligibility to whatever age is necessary to allow us to fulfill our future obligations. This means we have to take into account the lower birthrate of Americans today and the fact that we are living much longer than when the program was enacted. I am against means testing because it will give Americans incentives to squander and/or hide their assets before they are eligible for benefits (we see this done now with certain medical programs.)

      Furthermore, we should make participation in Social Security optional for Americans under the age of 40. This will begin to wean Americans off the welfare state and begin to reinstate individual responsibility for one's future. I am completely opposed to any raise in FICA taxes, which are already onerous on businesses, especially self-employed individuals.

      Cutting payments to Medicare "providers," which is what the debt ceiling bill apparently did, will only reduce access to those very providers of which we already have a shortage. Some politicians act as if this will not hurt patients. It will! We need to move future reforms in the direction of privatization (you can come up with a new word since that one seems to be politically loaded.) If we do not, we will never maintain or improve our standards of care.

      Americans subsidize pharmaceutical products to the rest of the world, as foreign governments make deals for drugs that undercut market prices. (There was an oped in the Wall Street Journal recently that explained this.) America is the only country that doesn't make such deals, so we pick up the slack and overpay for our medications so that the pharmaceuticals can make a profit. This is a difficult situation, but if we would eliminate the FDA and privatize the approval of pharmaceuticals with competing private agencies, I would bet the farm that we would vastly speed up new drug approval and reduce the cost of development. Various free-market think tanks have written on this topic. What do you think?

      Many Americans realize that if we do not make the tough changes today, we may not recognize our country in the future. Wouldn't that be a shame? We are depending on you to fight the good fight for our country.

      Sincerely,


      Lois Kaneshiki
      President, Blair County Republican Party
      Blair County Republican Committee member
      Co-founder, Blair County Tea Party
      Pennsylvania Precinct Project founder and coordinator
    • DAVID MCMILLAN
      Lois, I m for cutting spending but rather than do any picking and choosing I would like to see every single thing the government spends on cut 3% across the
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 3, 2011
        Lois,
         
        I'm for cutting spending but rather than do any picking and choosing I would like to see every single thing the government spends on cut 3% across the board. This would be enough to help and not enough to hurt any particular program. Why hasn't this been pushed at all?
         
        Regards,
         
        Dave
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Lois
        Sent: Wednesday, August 03, 2011 9:46 AM
        Subject: [pennsylvaniateaparties] letter to Pat Toomey

         

        Today I faxed this letter to Senator Toomey:

        Senator Pat Toomey
        502 Hart Senate Office Building
        Washington, D.C. 20510
        Phone: (202) 224-4254
        Fax: (202) 228-0284

        August 3, 2011

        Re: entitlement reform

        Dear Senator Toomey,

        I saw you speaking about the debt ceiling deal on Greta Van Susteren's show last night. I noticed you did not mention the urgent need for entitlement reform when you spoke about how the bill didn't go far enough in cutting government spending. I am writing to urge you to support substantive reforms to the Social Security and Medicare programs.

        We should raise the retirement age for Social Security eligibility to whatever age is necessary to allow us to fulfill our future obligations. This means we have to take into account the lower birthrate of Americans today and the fact that we are living much longer than when the program was enacted. I am against means testing because it will give Americans incentives to squander and/or hide their assets before they are eligible for benefits (we see this done now with certain medical programs.)

        Furthermore, we should make participation in Social Security optional for Americans under the age of 40. This will begin to wean Americans off the welfare state and begin to reinstate individual responsibility for one's future. I am completely opposed to any raise in FICA taxes, which are already onerous on businesses, especially self-employed individuals.

        Cutting payments to Medicare "providers," which is what the debt ceiling bill apparently did, will only reduce access to those very providers of which we already have a shortage. Some politicians act as if this will not hurt patients. It will! We need to move future reforms in the direction of privatization (you can come up with a new word since that one seems to be politically loaded.) If we do not, we will never maintain or improve our standards of care.

        Americans subsidize pharmaceutical products to the rest of the world, as foreign governments make deals for drugs that undercut market prices. (There was an oped in the Wall Street Journal recently that explained this.) America is the only country that doesn't make such deals, so we pick up the slack and overpay for our medications so that the pharmaceuticals can make a profit. This is a difficult situation, but if we would eliminate the FDA and privatize the approval of pharmaceuticals with competing private agencies, I would bet the farm that we would vastly speed up new drug approval and reduce the cost of development. Various free-market think tanks have written on this topic. What do you think?

        Many Americans realize that if we do not make the tough changes today, we may not recognize our country in the future. Wouldn't that be a shame? We are depending on you to fight the good fight for our country.

        Sincerely,

        Lois Kaneshiki
        President, Blair County Republican Party
        Blair County Republican Committee member
        Co-founder, Blair County Tea Party
        Pennsylvania Precinct Project founder and coordinator

      • Lois Kaneshiki
        Dave, you cannot cut entitlement spending 3% across the board because this requires a policy change FIRST. If you leave out entitlements and cut everything
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 3, 2011

          Dave, you cannot cut entitlement spending 3% across the board because this requires a policy change FIRST.

          If you leave out entitlements and cut everything else by 3%, that will not be enough.

           

          Also, you cannot cut your debt service payments by 3%.   Those costs are fixed.

           

          Take a look at the federal budget for yourself:

           

          http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/ce/Fy2010_spending_by_category.jpg

           

          IF you look at the projected spending it gets worse:

           

          http://mercatus.org/publication/federal-entitlement-spending-multiplies

           

          Keep in mind that when they are looking at spending as a percentage of national GDP, they have no idea what GDP is going to be!  If the economy continues to tank, these figures will skyrocket.

           

          Lois

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: pennsylvaniateaparties@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pennsylvaniateaparties@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of DAVID MCMILLAN
          Sent: Wednesday, August 03, 2011 9:57 AM
          To: pennsylvaniateaparties@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [pennsylvaniateaparties] letter to Pat Toomey

           

           

          Lois,

           

          I'm for cutting spending but rather than do any picking and choosing I would like to see every single thing the government spends on cut 3% across the board. This would be enough to help and not enough to hurt any particular program. Why hasn't this been pushed at all?

           

          Regards,

           

          Dave

           

           

          ----- Original Message -----

          From: Lois

          Sent: Wednesday, August 03, 2011 9:46 AM

          Subject: [pennsylvaniateaparties] letter to Pat Toomey

           

           

          Today I faxed this letter to Senator Toomey:

          Senator Pat Toomey
          502 Hart Senate Office Building
          Washington, D.C. 20510
          Phone: (202) 224-4254
          Fax: (202) 228-0284

          August 3, 2011

          Re: entitlement reform

          Dear Senator Toomey,

          I saw you speaking about the debt ceiling deal on Greta Van Susteren's show last night. I noticed you did not mention the urgent need for entitlement reform when you spoke about how the bill didn't go far enough in cutting government spending. I am writing to urge you to support substantive reforms to the Social Security and Medicare programs.

          We should raise the retirement age for Social Security eligibility to whatever age is necessary to allow us to fulfill our future obligations. This means we have to take into account the lower birthrate of Americans today and the fact that we are living much longer than when the program was enacted. I am against means testing because it will give Americans incentives to squander and/or hide their assets before they are eligible for benefits (we see this done now with certain medical programs.)

          Furthermore, we should make participation in Social Security optional for Americans under the age of 40. This will begin to wean Americans off the welfare state and begin to reinstate individual responsibility for one's future. I am completely opposed to any raise in FICA taxes, which are already onerous on businesses, especially self-employed individuals.

          Cutting payments to Medicare "providers," which is what the debt ceiling bill apparently did, will only reduce access to those very providers of which we already have a shortage. Some politicians act as if this will not hurt patients. It will! We need to move future reforms in the direction of privatization (you can come up with a new word since that one seems to be politically loaded.) If we do not, we will never maintain or improve our standards of care.

          Americans subsidize pharmaceutical products to the rest of the world, as foreign governments make deals for drugs that undercut market prices. (There was an oped in the Wall Street Journal recently that explained this.) America is the only country that doesn't make such deals, so we pick up the slack and overpay for our medications so that the pharmaceuticals can make a profit. This is a difficult situation, but if we would eliminate the FDA and privatize the approval of pharmaceuticals with competing private agencies, I would bet the farm that we would vastly speed up new drug approval and reduce the cost of development. Various free-market think tanks have written on this topic. What do you think?

          Many Americans realize that if we do not make the tough changes today, we may not recognize our country in the future. Wouldn't that be a shame? We are depending on you to fight the good fight for our country.

          Sincerely,

          Lois Kaneshiki
          President, Blair County Republican Party
          Blair County Republican Committee member
          Co-founder, Blair County Tea Party
          Pennsylvania Precinct Project founder and coordinator

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