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RE: [pdxbackstage] Audition call-backs

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  • Ginny Foster
    The discussion on actors asking to be informed of casting decisions had local playwrights laughing so hard we peed our pants. Because most of the time when
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 1, 2005
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      The discussion on actors asking to be informed of  casting decisions  had local  playwrights laughing so hard we peed our pants.  Because most of the time when we submit,  we are pissing in the wind at $12 each to send out a script.  The most common answer is not "No thank you; " but rather Silence.  Echoing down the ages of stages.
       
      You can tell a new playwright because she/he asks "Are multiple submissions okay?"  Well, yeah, unless you want to wait for The Millenium to Approacheth~ how many Archangels standing on the head of a pin would it  take before the playwright  would give up and send the newbie baby out again?
       
      That's why  playwrights like competitions and queries and grants. Somebody reads your stuff and you get an answer.   In a contest  the fat lady sings on a deadline and they announce the winsome songs in a few months (and incestual decisions are a taboo). Far-off competitions are not judging you on that awful first play you wrote in 1996.  Email queries are easily sent and answered.
       
       Locals Steve Patterson and Connor Kerns and Melinda Pittman and D'Mae Roberts have taken another possible route~~a pox on all your houses, I'm building my own.   Readers Rep puts out a call for plays once a year.  PCS has Jaws.  And they do answer.  Stark Raving put a call on their web site; does that mean they will read all submissions?
       
      Please don't write back about the lack of money for literary managers.  I know that.  I understand how busy and strapped companies are.  On Maslow's hierarchy of needs, answering script submissions is at the bottom of a company's  pyramid ~ and rightfully so.
       I don't see a way to fix it so playwrights would get~~not even judgment or comments~~simply "yes,  we read it and the answer is "it didn't make that first cut." (Even if it's a volunteer co-ordinator or the house manager who read it) And I know new plays are a financial risk.
       
      That's why playwrights are~~by default rather than design~~the purest of writers.  Poets can read at a slam.  Essayists have a good shot at op-ed pages. Books can be privately published and distributed as Christmas presents to friends and family.  Indy films have lots of cachet.  But playwrights? To survive, one must not become attached to results dependent on someone else's approval.
       
      Evidently many of us are in it as a practice.   For the getting better.  It's a Zen thing.
       
       Ginny Foster
       
      This is my letter to the world,
      that never wrote to me....
                 Emily Dickenson
    • Julie and Neal Starbird
      Hey Steve! It was just me (Neal) that sent out that reply; we just happen to share an e-mail account. On the pester thing, I TOTALLY appreciate what you re
      Message 2 of 21 , Dec 1, 2005
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        Hey Steve!
        It was just me (Neal) that sent out that reply; we just happen to share an e-mail account.
        On the pester thing, I TOTALLY appreciate what you're saying, but I'm sure you've heard the stories of directors making their final casting decisions because one actor in particular was on the horn asking about it and the director decided that they seemed hungrier/wanted it more. Whether there is any validity to those stories or not, it's the kind of thing that gets lodged in an actors brain. So while you are sitting at home patiently waiting, hoping to hear something, one part of your brain is saying "If I was the director, I would want time and space to make my decisions based solely on the auditions", while the other part is saying "Damn, damn, damn! Should I call and ask if there's any movement? Should I try to find what bar they hang out at and go buy them a drink? How much ass-kissing could I conceivably squeeze in between the audition and the first rehearsal?". And while you know which way you would prefer to treat and be treated, you can't help but wonder if this casting could go that other way.
        And please don't get me wrong, I think we are certainly talking about a minority of audition scenarios. Many auditions do have call-back times posted or announced. Most auditors, after a call-back, will get back to you one way or another. If you have any kind of relationship with the people involved they will most often get back to you even if you're not getting called back. I generally find that the majority of those in casting positions here conduct themselves appropriately with respect and professionalism.
        And to answer a question I think Olga asked, I'm totally fine with e-mail notification if I'm not getting cast. Especially from the first round of auditions. There can be a lot of phone calls to make there, and I understand not wanting to be left open to actors asking why they're not getting called-back/cast. However, I think I would prefer a phone call if I am getting called-back, or if I am no longer under consideration after multiple rounds of auditioning.
        Generally, after the first round of auditions I try to pretend it never happened. That way if you're not getting called back you're already moving on, and if you do get called-back you can be elated. I will say, though, that there have been a few times when I really wanted a part at a company I had worked with in the past. And in some of those cases I wasn't hearing anything after the first round, but scuttlebutt is that casting isn't finalized. Couple of weeks later I have to get a hold of them because I'm trying to get my season in order, and they know I'm not under consideration any more? I admit, I get a little miffed. If you have history with an actor, I do hope you will let them know if they're not getting called back. That will give the acting community as a whole the impression that you and your organization place real value on them. It's always nice to feel like there's more humanity in the process, and not less.

        Neal

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Steve Alexander <redcat.steve@...>
        Sent: Nov 30, 2005 8:37 PM
        To: PDX Backstage <pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, et cetera

        For the Starbird�s question:

        There is an easy way to decide whether to call and �pester� a director: Ask
        for the casting date at auditions. They ought to give it to you, and it�s
        your prerogative to know that info. Don�t pester before that date. And if
        you do check up after the date, yes, Julie-Neal, do it sparingly but
        courteously. I would hope that, as a director, I never like to feel that
        someone is �pestering� me.

        Perhaps they don�t have a final date for casting. I�ve had to hold off on
        casting for so many reasons: out-of-town auditions, not finding that one
        perfect person for that one role, waiting for everyone to say �yes� before I
        finish the �no� pile. So there are good reasons NOT to pester if they give
        no firm date at audition � cause they want more time, and they know it up
        front. In such cases, �pestering� is annoying and definitely can affect
        casting.

        If the auditor does not share a date for casting, ask simply: �Can I can in
        a week and find out?� You can also ask, �Do you plan to call everyone as to
        whether they are in or not?� Again, the time for pestering is established,
        and you are fine.

        But if you ever feel that you are about to enter the BAD pester zone . . .
        Well, ask the admin assistant or box office person or stage manager when the
        director is going to call you, if they are done casting, etc. Directors
        often don�t want to be influenced by random calls (specially if you suck),
        and don�t be surprised if they don�t give you reasons why you aren�t cast.
        It�s so subjective, and half the time, I have no idea why I didn�t cast a
        specific person.

        stevea
      • Kevin Scott
        One piece of professional courtesy that might be helpful to new folk (and those who have been out of touch for a while, which would include me), and which, so
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 1, 2005
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          One piece of professional courtesy that might be helpful to new folk
          (and those who have been out of touch for a while, which would include
          me), and which, so far I have seen put into practice in just one
          theatre: the now long-gone and totally Equity-actor-run NYC Equity
          Library Theatre

          ELT posted in the actors' waiting area a list of the folk who would
          be sitting at the table (and the piano, if applicable) in the audition
          room, together with COPIES OF ALL THEIR RÉSUMÉS -- as Steve Alexander
          pointed out in his post under "[pdxbackstage] Audition information, et
          cetera" at 8:54 PM on Nov 30, research is a very good thing, and more
          than arguably part of the actor's responsibility, but it's not easy to
          research people when you do not know who they are, and those in charge
          of getting the actors slotted and in and out may be too busy handling
          those logistics to get around to sharing all of that information.

          I long ago decided that when I am in charge of running the auditions,
          I would try to follow ELT's admirable practice, and wish that more
          production companies would.

          Kevin Scott
          kevinnscott@...
          www.geocities.com/k_n_scott
        • mary mcdonald-lewis
          Ginny Foster wrote: To survive, one must not become attached to results dependent on someone else s approval. Evidently many of us are in it as a practice.
          Message 4 of 21 , Dec 1, 2005
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            Ginny Foster wrote:


            To survive, one must not become attached to results dependent on someone else's approval.
            Evidently many of us are in it as a practice.   For the getting better.  It's a Zen thing.



            --I sure understand how hard it is to work as a playwright in the face of getting what you need (responses and critiques) in order to improve and be produced.  And RTR is indeed pleased to be an incubator for the process (we do read all and get back to folks).  However, though our crafts as actors and writers are symbiotic and obviously intersect, the ways in which artists in each discipline are treated have nothing to do with one another.  Everyone should be treated with respect and be armed with as much information as is appropriate in as timely a fashion possible, but depending on what it is one *does* -- temp. worker, chiropractor, playwright, stockbroker, tarot card reader, actor, farmer -- all of us must navigate through our careers based on the reality of what those gigs *are.*

            As to Ginny's wonderful comment, above... it actually applies to all of us, stockbroker and tarot card reader included.

            GREAT conversation, one and all.  

            MM


          • mary mcdonald-lewis
            One quick comment -- I resonate more with Neal s comments than Steve s in this regard, working as both actor and director. As a young voice actor 25 years
            Message 5 of 21 , Dec 1, 2005
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              One quick comment -- I resonate more with Neal's comments than
              Steve's in this regard, working as both actor and director. As a
              young voice actor 25 years back in LA, I was an inveterate marketer.
              I'm sure some folks found it annoying, but others, I am sure, noticed
              how I stood out from the others and at the very least gave me props
              for stick-to-it-iveness. No one knows why or how a person becomes a
              working actor, but I think my marketing and tenacity was a
              contributing factor.

              This is key, I think: develop relationships with the folks you want
              to work with well beyond the limits of the project, or even the
              company. If I wanted to impress Lana Veenker (and who doesn't? ;->!)
              to enhance my shot at being called for castings, I would be careful
              to get involved with her political or philanthropic endeavors. Not
              cynically, mind you; I happen to fervently agree with Lana on all
              things politic. So, if I am planning to walk a picket line anyway
              about some recent horrific atrocity done in the name of my county,
              why not support Lana (in this example) on the one she organized?

              Those sorts of opportunities -- not necessarily political, but
              charitable, artistic, you name it -- *abound.* It's easy to get
              involved, it's fun, and you build relationship.

              OK, back to work.

              MM


              On Dec 1, 2005, at 9:06 AM, Julie and Neal Starbird wrote:

              > Hey Steve!
              > It was just me (Neal) that sent out that reply; we just happen
              > to share an e-mail account.
              > On the pester thing, I TOTALLY appreciate what you're saying,
              > but I'm sure you've heard the stories of directors making their
              > final casting decisions because one actor in particular was on the
              > horn asking about it and the director decided that they seemed
              > hungrier/wanted it more. Whether there is any validity to those
              > stories or not, it's the kind of thing that gets lodged in an
              > actors brain. So while you are sitting at home patiently waiting,
              > hoping to hear something, one part of your brain is saying "If I
              > was the director, I would want time and space to make my decisions
              > based solely on the auditions", while the other part is saying
              > "Damn, damn, damn! Should I call and ask if there's any movement?
              > Should I try to find what bar they hang out at and go buy them a
              > drink? How much ass-kissing could I conceivably squeeze in between
              > the audition and the first rehearsal?". And while you know which
              > way you would prefer to treat and be treated, you can't help but
              > wonder if this casting could go that other way.
              > And please don't get me wrong, I think we are certainly
              > talking about a minority of audition scenarios. Many auditions do
              > have call-back times posted or announced. Most auditors, after a
              > call-back, will get back to you one way or another. If you have
              > any kind of relationship with the people involved they will most
              > often get back to you even if you're not getting called back. I
              > generally find that the majority of those in casting positions here
              > conduct themselves appropriately with respect and professionalism.
              > And to answer a question I think Olga asked, I'm totally fine
              > with e-mail notification if I'm not getting cast. Especially from
              > the first round of auditions. There can be a lot of phone calls to
              > make there, and I understand not wanting to be left open to actors
              > asking why they're not getting called-back/cast. However, I think
              > I would prefer a phone call if I am getting called-back, or if I am
              > no longer under consideration after multiple rounds of auditioning.
              > Generally, after the first round of auditions I try to pretend
              > it never happened. That way if you're not getting called back
              > you're already moving on, and if you do get called-back you can be
              > elated. I will say, though, that there have been a few times when
              > I really wanted a part at a company I had worked with in the past.
              > And in some of those cases I wasn't hearing anything after the
              > first round, but scuttlebutt is that casting isn't finalized.
              > Couple of weeks later I have to get a hold of them because I'm
              > trying to get my season in order, and they know I'm not under
              > consideration any more? I admit, I get a little miffed. If you
              > have history with an actor, I do hope you will let them know if
              > they're not getting called back. That will give the acting
              > community as a whole the impression that you and your organization
              > place real value on them. It's always nice to feel like there's
              > more humanity in the process, and not less.
              >
              > Neal
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Steve Alexander <redcat.steve@...>
              > Sent: Nov 30, 2005 8:37 PM
              > To: PDX Backstage <pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com>
              > Subject: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, et cetera
              >
              > For the Starbird�s question:
              >
              > There is an easy way to decide whether to call and
              > �pester� a director: Ask
              > for the casting date at auditions. They ought to give it to you,
              > and it�s
              > your prerogative to know that info. Don�t pester before
              > that date. And if
              > you do check up after the date, yes, Julie-Neal, do it sparingly but
              > courteously. I would hope that, as a director, I never like to
              > feel that
              > someone is �pestering� me.
              >
              > Perhaps they don�t have a final date for casting.
              > I�ve had to hold off on
              > casting for so many reasons: out-of-town auditions, not finding
              > that one
              > perfect person for that one role, waiting for everyone to say
              > �yes� before I
              > finish the �no� pile. So there are good reasons NOT
              > to pester if they give
              > no firm date at audition � cause they want more time, and
              > they know it up
              > front. In such cases, �pestering� is annoying and
              > definitely can affect
              > casting.
              >
              > If the auditor does not share a date for casting, ask simply:
              > �Can I can in
              > a week and find out?� You can also ask, �Do you plan
              > to call everyone as to
              > whether they are in or not?� Again, the time for pestering
              > is established,
              > and you are fine.
              >
              > But if you ever feel that you are about to enter the BAD pester
              > zone . . .
              > Well, ask the admin assistant or box office person or stage manager
              > when the
              > director is going to call you, if they are done casting, etc.
              > Directors
              > often don�t want to be influenced by random calls (specially
              > if you suck),
              > and don�t be surprised if they don�t give you reasons
              > why you aren�t cast.
              > It�s so subjective, and half the time, I have no idea why I
              > didn�t cast a
              > specific person.
              >
              > stevea
              >
              >
              >
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            • Dana Meadows-Hawthorne
              Speaking of the stuff about paid/not paid, I agree it s worth letting people know. I know I don t search for gigs strictly on that basis, but it is a courtesy
              Message 6 of 21 , Dec 1, 2005
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                Speaking of the stuff about paid/not paid, I agree it's worth letting people know. I know I don't search for gigs strictly on that basis, but it is a courtesy to inform.

                Here's what really got me: I set up an audition, prepared my piece, did all that stuff, etc.--then well into the whole thing worrying about it I found out that not only did it not pay, but I HAD TO PAY TO PARTICIPATE!! This was a music gig, not a theatre gig, but I really think if there's payment involved on the part of the performer it should be indicated in the initial audition notice.
                Dana Meadows-Hawthorne

                On 12/1/05, Kevin Scott <kevinnscott@...> wrote:
                One piece of professional courtesy that might be helpful to new folk
                (and those who have been out of touch for a while, which would include
                me), and which, so far I have seen put into practice in just one
                theatre: the now long-gone and totally Equity-actor-run NYC Equity
                Library Theatre

                ELT posted in the actors'  waiting area a list of the folk who would
                be sitting at the table (and the piano, if applicable) in the audition
                room, together with COPIES OF ALL THEIR RÉSUMÉS -- as Steve Alexander
                pointed out in his post under "[pdxbackstage] Audition information, et
                cetera" at 8:54 PM on Nov 30, research is a very good thing, and more
                than arguably part of the actor's responsibility, but it's not easy to
                research people when you do not know who they are, and those in charge
                of getting the actors slotted and in and out may be too busy handling
                those logistics to get around to sharing all of that information.

                I long ago decided that when I am in charge of running the auditions,
                I would try to follow ELT's admirable practice, and wish that more
                production companies would.

                Kevin Scott
                kevinnscott@...
                www.geocities.com/k_n_scott


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              • Joe Healy
                Just to add a little flavor and chuckle to this good conversation, I have a pet peeve: You ve been cast in a show, but NO ONE from the theatre informed you
                Message 7 of 21 , Dec 2, 2005
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                  Just to add a little flavor and chuckle to this good conversation, I have a pet peeve:

                  You've been cast in a show, but NO ONE from the theatre informed you that you had been cast.  And they assume since you didn't show up at initial rehearsal that  you weren't interested in the role!  Assume?!  There wasn't even a phone call to say; hey, where were you?, what's going on?, etc.  This wasn't any small time theatre; it was a very reputable professional theatre here in Portland.  I know this is very RARE, but it did happen to my lovely wife Dee several years ago.  There wasn't even so much as an apology.  I mean, good God; it's hard enough to wonder if you'll be called back or cast and to debate whether or no you should call, but to BE CAST and NOT notified is the worst possible thing!!!  Yikes! 

                  I know this doesn't help the dialogue much but I thought I'd entertain you all.

                  Joe

                  PS ~ My two cents as an actor ~ if there was a callback I'll call the theatre if I haven't heard for a few days just to check in.  It allows me to either move on or be a little more patient (if a decision hasn't been made.)  In fact, last year I called the director of a show after not hearing from him and asked what the status was.  He stated, the role had been offered but he hadn't heard back and if he didn't hear back from that particular actor in 24 hours the role was mine.  I ended up getting the role.  I wasn't necessarily jumping up and down being 2nd choice...but hey I wanted the role and if I didn't call I probably would not have been contacted.  As for my experience in film ~ getting notified is rare unless you know the casting person.


                  From: "Hunter, Debbie" <debbie.hunter@...>
                  To: <pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com>
                  Subject: RE: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, Pet Peeve, and professional courtesy
                  Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 09:27:22 -0800

                  We have found it a good practice at Quintessence to set a certain date
                  (and ourselves a deadline) by noting in the audition information "If you
                  don't hear from us by (such and such a date), then unfortunately we were
                  not able to cast you."  Then if that timeline changes for some reason, I
                  believe you are obligated to call people and let them know.  If at all
                  possible, we like to send a letter to those we did not cast thanking
                  them for their time.  Of course this may not be feasible for every
                  theater...I think it's awkward for a director to be put on the spot and
                  in essence have to tell an actor why they were not cast - but if you
                  don't make the process clear then you have to be open to that.

                  Basically, both actors and theaters need to recognize that they are
                  making certain "agreements" along the process.  If I'm an actor and I
                  audition, then I am agreeing that I am truly interested in being cast.
                  We give directors our conflicts and thereby agree on our availability.
                  We agree when rehearsal is supposed to start and finish.  Any time we
                  break these agreements (we don't call back...we add a conflict...we stay
                  later than scheduled to rehearse...) We need to acknowledge that we are
                  asking for something more and not just assume it will be accomodated.

                  Well - there's two cents anyhow....

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com]
                  On Behalf Of Julie and Neal Starbird
                  Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2005 8:44 AM
                  To: Jonah Weston; pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, Pet Peeve, and
                  professional courtesy


                  Hi,
                       Interesting.  Couple of questions (this isn't disagreement, just
                  throwing it out there). 
                  1)  Is it okay to call back the theatre/director and pester them about
                  whether the casting has been done?  Say...if it's been a week since your
                  callback and you haven't been contacted?  Having done it once, is it
                  okay to do it again if say another week has gone by without hearing
                  back?  Always a tough decision for me personally.
                  2)  In film, I have always found that I don't hear a peep unless I've
                  been booked, or at least put on availability.  I've gone in to read for
                  stuff 3 or 4 times, and if they don't cast me I never hear from them
                  again.  Same issue, but seems like people in film are far more accepting
                  of the practice.  What about that?

                  Neal

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Jonah Weston <jonahweston@...>
                  Sent: Nov 29, 2005 5:44 PM
                  To: pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, Pet Peeve, and
                  professional courtesy

                  Hi All,

                  I am in complete agreement with both John and Mary
                  about the audition postings and about returning
                  business calls.  I thought I would point out the flip
                  side to Mary's coin.  If you are a director and have
                  had a preliminary audition for your show, you
                  generally have callbacks, right?  After the callback
                  if you have decided not to use an actor that you have
                  called back, it is customary (at least in every
                  theatre I have worked for) to inform that actor that
                  you are unable to use them for that show. 

                  Now, like John I am new to Portland, and I don't know
                  how you do things down here, but I am sure that I
                  speak for other actors who, like me, perform out of
                  town a lot.  I work with a number of regional theatres
                  that try to get casting done sometimes months ahead of
                  time, and it puts us actors in a tough situation if I
                  really want to do this show in Portland but I have an
                  offer for something in Seattle. 

                  As Mary pointed out this is the technological age with internet, cell
                  phones, text messaging,  etc...  In my humble new guy opinion it is not
                  too much to ask that, after a callback, if you have made the decision
                  that you cannot use a particular actor, be professional and courteous
                  and inform that actor that they did not get the job.  As Mary also
                  pointed out this is a business and many of us do this for a living as
                  much as we can, which means that we are constantly auditioning not only
                  in Portland but all over the northwest and the country.  Schedules are
                  tight and we need to know whether or not we need to make that roadtrip
                  to Spokane for a callback or audition. (which can be a considerable
                  expense on an actors salary)

                  Anyway, there is my 2 cents.  I have been told that
                  this is a rare occurence in Portland but perhaps it is
                  worthy of consideration by this community.

                  I have heard the argument that most employers in the
                  standard business world do not necessarily  call you
                  to inform you that you did not get the job, I do not
                  believe that argument applies for the following
                  reasons:

                  1) In the standard business world there are quite a
                  few more jobs than in theatre. (Portland may be an
                  exception to this, but you know what I mean)

                  2) After a second (or third) interview (callback) most employers WILL
                  call you and inform you that you did not get the job.

                  3) Actors are independent contractors. We have a
                  contract from one date to another, for this much
                  money.  When our contract is up, we are out of a job
                  and need to find another one.  Theatre is a very
                  different business than ones in the standard business
                  world, and we all make a great deal less money than
                  your average employee. It is simply professional
                  courtesy in a market with few jobs and a lot of people
                  wanting them, to let your fellow artists know what
                  their position is as soon as possible, so we can go
                  out and find more work.

                  We are a community and we need to look out for each
                  other.

                  Like I said, I too am new to this community and
                  perhaps this sounds like an outrageous suggestion, but
                  I thought I would throw it out there.

                  Sincerely,

                  Jonah Weston

                  --- pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com wrote:

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                  >
                  >
                  > There are 2 messages in this issue.
                  >
                  > Topics in this digest:
                  >
                  >       1. Audition Information & Pet Peeve
                  >            From: mary mcdonald-lewis
                  > <mary@...>
                  >       2. Happy F**king Holidays One Act Festival
                  >            From: jennifer osowski
                  > <taraleyna@...>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  ________________________________________________________________________
                  >
                  ________________________________________________________________________
                  >
                  > Message: 1        
                  >    Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2005 10:35:41 -0800
                  >    From: mary mcdonald-lewis <mary@...>
                  > Subject: Audition Information & Pet Peeve
                  >
                  > Thanks for a thorough description of what should be
                  > in audition
                  > notices, AKA.  I'm with you 1000%.
                  >
                  > I wanted to add a pet peeve of mine (though as
                  > disagreeable as they
                  > are, why would *anyone* want to have a Peeve as a
                  > pet?!?):
                  >
                  > 1.  I call and/or email an actor to read for a part,
                  > or (if I've
                  > worked with them before) even just to ask if he or
                  > she can consider a 
                  > role in something at RTR.
                  > 2.  They don't call or email back.
                  >
                  > Now, some might call or email in a week or so
                  > (HUH?!?), but others
                  > never do.  And often I'll call or write these people
                  > more than once.
                  >
                  > In this age of voice mail, cell phones, and Internet
                  > Cafes, I don't
                  > think there's an excuse not to return a business
                  > call.  I hate to 
                  > think it's because my theatre company is small, or
                  > that it is script-
                  > in-hand... first of all, professional courtesy is
                  > appropriate no 
                  > matter who you are dealing with; secondly we do some
                  > pretty 
                  > interesting stuff over there; and thirdly you never
                  > know *who's* 
                  > going to see your work there!  (Local agents
                  > regularly come, and 
                  > other theatre folk with companies of their own, of
                  > course... we're 
                  > very lucky in that regard.  So even for pragmatic
                  > reasons it makes 
                  > sense.)  And lastly it's just plain good manners.
                  >
                  > The problem ranges from people who are new to the
                  > business, to people
                  > who are longtime artistic directors along with being
                  > actors and who 
                  > really, really should know better.
                  >
                  > Now, thankfully, most actors call back right away,
                  > many of whom are
                  > the hardest-working artists in town.  Those who
                  > don't call back don't 
                  > get called again, so I suppose through some
                  > Darwinian process of 
                  > elimination I will eventually have my (gloriously
                  > large) roster of 
                  > talent, with new folks arriving every day, to choose
                  > from.  But RTR 
                  > stages 9 productions a year, with anywhere from 1 to
                  > ten plays in an 
                  > evening.  That's a lot of casting, and this bad
                  > habit makes it that 
                  > much more challenging.
                  >
                  > OK, I gotta go.  Time to walk the damn Peeve.
                  > AGAIN.
                  >
                  > MM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Nov 25, 2005, at 10:41 AM, johnnystnick wrote:
                  >
                  > > So, I love that there are so many audition
                  > listings on this site.
                  > > It's nice to not have to shell out 6 bucks a week
                  > for a trade
                  > > newspaper. But one thing those newspapers DO have
                  > over PDX
                  > > Backstage/Onstage (besides that SILLY-high cover
                  > price) is a uniform
                  > > specificality of information.
                  > >
                  > > Many of the auditions posted here are lacking one
                  > or more of the
                  > > following important items of info;
                  > > -A rough (at least) outline of the performance AND
                  > rehearsal
                  > > schedules
                  > > -Whether or not there is pay involved
                  > > -whether or not you are seeing Equity actors
                  > >
                  > > Now, don't get me wrong-I still definitely prefer
                  > this way over the
                  > > newspapers, even as is. I don't even mind
                  > auditioning for things I
                  > > don't have any chance of being cast in, keeps me
                  > sharp, keeps me
                  > > doin' stuff. I just don't want to waste people's
                  > time. When the info
                  > > comes in, after the fact, I don't like to have to
                  > tell people I
                  > > can't do it after all.
                  > >
                  > > I know that there are not many houses in town that
                  > will hire union
                  > > actors, so maybe it's just assumed by everyone
                  > that, unless it is
                  > > stated so, Equity actors need not apply. But hey,
                  > I'm the new guy.
                  > > There are other new guys and gals, too. Even some
                  > theatres that are
                  > > listed as Equity-employing theatres, in the
                  > regional theatre
                  > > directory, I have found not to be so.
                  > >
                  > > As far as pay-you don't even have to list
                  > specifics-just say if
                  > > there is any pay or not. Again, I know there ain't
                  > a whole lotta'
                  > > beans to go around, so maybe it's assumed that,
                  > unless otherwise
                  > > stated, no pay. But I know there are paying jobs
                  > out there, so...
                  > >
                  > > In the end, if this info is still missing, I will
                  > ALWAYS choose to
                  > > audition-risking the chance I get a part I don't
                  > want/can't take.
                  > > Better that than NOT to audition and find out
                  > later I DID want
                  > > it/COULD HAVE taken it. So, as long as you don't
                  > mind spending 2
                  > > minutes watching me do my monologue, we're cool.
                  > >
                  > > John San Nicolas
                  > > AKA Johnny St. Nick
                  > > AKA Elliot Ruiz
                  > > AKA The San Diego Chargers Are the Greatest Sports
                  > Organization In
                  > > World History
                  > > AKA Not Really But a Guy Can Dream
                  > > AKA My Stomach Hurts From Thanksgiving Day
                  > Gluttony
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                  > --------------------
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                  > > home page
                  > >
                  >
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                  > >
                  >
                  --------------------------------------------------------------------
                  >
                  > > ~->
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                • Camille Cettina
                  My own chuckle to contribute regarding being notified of whether or not I am cast or called back: One artistic director was so thoughtful/thorough in
                  Message 8 of 21 , Dec 2, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    My own chuckle to contribute regarding being notified
                    of whether or not I am cast or called back: One
                    artistic director was so thoughtful/thorough in
                    contacting actors who they did not want for roles that
                    I was privileged to receive TWO, count then TWO,
                    rejection messages. I GET IT! You don't want me! I
                    really did appreciate the personal voicemail, and
                    enjoyed the humor of being rejected twice!

                    On another note-I am a big fan of the "you will know
                    you are called back by this date" (If you don't hear
                    from us, thank you but no thank you) the less guess
                    work the better. I do think, however, that once you
                    are called back, you've earned the the couresty email
                    or vm with a Yes or No--Portland is small enough to
                    make that, while sometimes tedious, still do-able.

                    Camille

                    --- Joe Healy <joehealy66@...> wrote:


                    ---------------------------------

                    Just to add a little flavor and chuckle to this good
                    conversation, I have a pet peeve:

                    You've been cast in a show, but NO ONE from the
                    theatre informed you that you had been cast. And they
                    assume since you didn't show up at initial rehearsal
                    that you weren't interested in the role! Assume?!
                    There wasn't even a phone call to say; hey, where were
                    you?, what's going on?, etc. This wasn't any small
                    time theatre; it was a very reputable professional
                    theatre here in Portland. I know this is very RARE,
                    but it did happen to my lovely wife Dee several years
                    ago. There wasn't even so much as an apology. I
                    mean, good God; it's hard enough to wonder if you'll
                    be called back or cast and to debate whether or no you
                    should call, but to BE CAST and NOT notified is the
                    worst possible thing!!! Yikes!

                    I know this doesn't help the dialogue much but I
                    thought I'd entertain you all.

                    Joe

                    PS ~ My two cents as an actor ~ if there was a
                    callback I'll call the theatre if I haven't heard for
                    a few days just to check in. It allows me to either
                    move on or be a little more patient (if a decision
                    hasn't been made.) In fact, last year I called the
                    director of a show after not hearing from him and
                    asked what the status was. He stated, the role had
                    been offered but he hadn't heard back and if he didn't
                    hear back from that particular actor in 24 hours the
                    role was mine. I ended up getting the role. I wasn't
                    necessarily jumping up and down being 2nd choice...but
                    hey I wanted the role and if I didn't call I probably
                    would not have been contacted. As for my experience
                    in film ~ getting notified is rare unless you know the
                    casting person.

                    ---------------------------------
                    From: "Hunter, Debbie" <debbie.hunter@...>
                    To: <pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com>
                    Subject: RE: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, Pet
                    Peeve, and professional courtesy
                    Date: Wed, 30 Nov 2005 09:27:22 -0800

                    We have found it a good practice at Quintessence to
                    set a certain date
                    (and ourselves a deadline) by noting in the audition
                    information "If you
                    don't hear from us by (such and such a date), then
                    unfortunately we were
                    not able to cast you." Then if that timeline changes
                    for some reason, I
                    believe you are obligated to call people and let them
                    know. If at all
                    possible, we like to send a letter to those we did not
                    cast thanking
                    them for their time. Of course this may not be
                    feasible for every
                    theater...I think it's awkward for a director to be
                    put on the spot and
                    in essence have to tell an actor why they were not
                    cast - but if you
                    don't make the process clear then you have to be open
                    to that.

                    Basically, both actors and theaters need to recognize
                    that they are
                    making certain "agreements" along the process. If I'm
                    an actor and I
                    audition, then I am agreeing that I am truly
                    interested in being cast.
                    We give directors our conflicts and thereby agree on
                    our availability.
                    We agree when rehearsal is supposed to start and
                    finish. Any time we
                    break these agreements (we don't call back...we add a
                    conflict...we stay
                    later than scheduled to rehearse...) We need to
                    acknowledge that we are
                    asking for something more and not just assume it will
                    be accomodated.

                    Well - there's two cents anyhow....

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com]
                    On Behalf Of Julie and Neal Starbird
                    Sent: Wednesday, November 30, 2005 8:44 AM
                    To: Jonah Weston; pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, Pet
                    Peeve, and
                    professional courtesy


                    Hi,
                    Interesting. Couple of questions (this isn't
                    disagreement, just
                    throwing it out there).
                    1) Is it okay to call back the theatre/director and
                    pester them about
                    whether the casting has been done? Say...if it's been
                    a week since your
                    callback and you haven't been contacted? Having done
                    it once, is it
                    okay to do it again if say another week has gone by
                    without hearing
                    back? Always a tough decision for me personally.
                    2) In film, I have always found that I don't hear a
                    peep unless I've
                    been booked, or at least put on availability. I've
                    gone in to read for
                    stuff 3 or 4 times, and if they don't cast me I never
                    hear from them
                    again. Same issue, but seems like people in film are
                    far more accepting
                    of the practice. What about that?

                    Neal

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Jonah Weston <jonahweston@...>
                    Sent: Nov 29, 2005 5:44 PM
                    To: pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, Pet
                    Peeve, and
                    professional courtesy

                    Hi All,

                    I am in complete agreement with both John and Mary
                    about the audition postings and about returning
                    business calls. I thought I would point out the flip
                    side to Mary's coin. If you are a director and have
                    had a preliminary audition for your show, you
                    generally have callbacks, right? After the callback
                    if you have decided not to use an actor that you have
                    called back, it is customary (at least in every
                    theatre I have worked for) to inform that actor that
                    you are unable to use them for that show.

                    Now, like John I am new to Portland, and I don't know
                    how you do things down here, but I am sure that I
                    speak for other actors who, like me, perform out of
                    town a lot. I work with a number of regional theatres
                    that try to get casting done sometimes months ahead of
                    time, and it puts us actors in a tough situation if I
                    really want to do this show in Portland but I have an
                    offer for something in Seattle.

                    As Mary pointed out this is the technological age with
                    internet, cell
                    phones, text messaging, etc... In my humble new guy
                    opinion it is not
                    too much to ask that, after a callback, if you have
                    made the decision
                    that you cannot use a particular actor, be
                    professional and courteous
                    and inform that actor that they did not get the job.
                    As Mary also
                    pointed out this is a business and many of us do this
                    for a living as
                    much as we can, which means that we are constantly
                    auditioning not only
                    in Portland but all over the northwest and the
                    country. Schedules are
                    tight and we need to know whether or not we need to
                    make that roadtrip
                    to Spokane for a callback or audition. (which can be a
                    considerable
                    expense on an actors salary)

                    Anyway, there is my 2 cents. I have been told that
                    this is a rare occurence in Portland but perhaps it is
                    worthy of consideration by this community.

                    I have heard the argument that most employers in the
                    standard business world do not necessarily call you
                    to inform you that you did not get the job, I do not
                    believe that argument applies for the following
                    reasons:

                    1) In the standard business world there are quite a
                    few more jobs than in theatre. (Portland may be an
                    exception to this, but you know what I mean)

                    2) After a second (or third) interview (callback) most
                    employers WILL
                    call you and inform you that you did not get the job.

                    3) Actors are independent contractors. We have a
                    contract from one date to another, for this much
                    money. When our contract is up, we are out of a job
                    and need to find another one. Theatre is a very
                    different business than ones in the standard business
                    world, and we all make a great deal less money than
                    your average employee. It is simply professional
                    courtesy in a market with few jobs and a lot of people
                    wanting them, to let your fellow artists know what
                    their position is as soon as possible, so we can go
                    out and find more work.

                    We are a community and we need to look out for each
                    other.

                    Like I said, I too am new to this community and
                    perhaps this sounds like an outrageous suggestion, but
                    I thought I would throw it out there.

                    Sincerely,

                    Jonah Weston

                    --- pdxbackstage@yahoogroups.com wrote:

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                    >
                    >
                    > There are 2 messages in this issue.
                    >
                    > Topics in this digest:
                    >
                    > 1. Audition Information & Pet Peeve
                    > From: mary mcdonald-lewis
                    > <mary@...>
                    > 2. Happy F**king Holidays One Act Festival
                    > From: jennifer osowski
                    > <taraleyna@...>
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    ________________________________________________________________________
                    >
                    ________________________________________________________________________
                    >
                    > Message: 1
                    > Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2005 10:35:41 -0800
                    > From: mary mcdonald-lewis <mary@...>
                    > Subject: Audition Information & Pet Peeve
                    >
                    > Thanks for a thorough description of what should be
                    > in audition
                    > notices, AKA. I'm with you 1000%.
                    >
                    > I wanted to add a pet peeve of mine (though as
                    > disagreeable as they
                    > are, why would *anyone* want to have a Peeve as a
                    > pet?!?):
                    >
                    > 1. I call and/or email an actor to read for a part,
                    > or (if I've
                    > worked with them before) even just to ask if he or
                    > she can consider a
                    > role in something at RTR.
                    > 2. They don't call or email back.
                    >
                    > Now, some might call or email in a week or so
                    > (HUH?!?), but others
                    > never do. And often I'll call or write these people
                    > more than once.
                    >
                    > In this age of voice mail, cell phones, and Internet
                    > Cafes, I don't
                    > think there's an excuse not to return a business
                    > call. I hate to
                    > think it's because my theatre company is small, or
                    > that it is script-
                    > in-hand... first of all, professional courtesy is
                    > appropriate no
                    > matter who you are dealing with; secondly we do some
                    > pretty
                    > interesting stuff over there; and thirdly you never
                    > know *who's*
                    > going to see your work there! (Local agents
                    > regularly come, and
                    > other theatre folk with companies of their own, of
                    > course... we're
                    > very lucky in that regard. So even for pragmatic
                    > reasons it makes
                    > sense.) And lastly it's just plain good manners.
                    >
                    > The problem ranges from people who are new to the
                    > business, to people
                    > who are longtime artistic directors along with being
                    > actors and who
                    > really, really should know better.
                    >
                    > Now, thankfully, most actors call back right away,
                    > many of whom are
                    > the hardest-working artists in town. Those who
                    > don't call back don't
                    > get called again, so I suppose through some
                    > Darwinian process of
                    > elimination I will eventually have my (gloriously
                    > large) roster of
                    > talent, with new folks arriving every day, to choose
                    > from. But RTR
                    > stages 9 productions a year, with anywhere from 1 to
                    > ten plays in an
                    > evening. That's a lot of casting, and this bad
                    > habit makes it that
                    > much more challenging.
                    >
                    > OK, I gotta go. Time to walk the damn Peeve.
                    > AGAIN.
                    >
                    > MM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > On Nov 25, 2005, at 10:41 AM, johnnystnick wrote:
                    >
                    > > So, I love that there are so many audition
                    > listings on this site.
                    > > It's nice to not have to shell out 6 bucks a week
                    > for a trade
                    > > newspaper. But one thing those newspapers DO have
                    > over PDX
                    > > Backstage/Onstage (besides that SILLY-high cover
                    > price) is a uniform
                    > > specificality of information.
                    > >
                    > > Many of the auditions posted here are lacking one
                    > or more of the
                    > > following important items of info;
                    > > -A rough (at least) outline of the performance AND
                    > rehearsal
                    > > schedules
                    > > -Whether or not there is pay involved
                    > > -whether or not you are seeing Equity actors
                    > >
                    > > Now, don't get me wrong-I still definitely prefer
                    > this way over the
                    > > newspapers, even as is. I don't even mind
                    > auditioning for things I
                    > > don't have any chance of being cast in, keeps me
                    > sharp, keeps me
                    > > doin' stuff. I just don't want to waste people's
                    > time. When the info
                    > > comes in, after the fact, I don't like to have to
                    > tell people I
                    > > can't do it after all.
                    > >
                    > > I know that there are not many houses in town that
                    > will hire union
                    > > actors, so maybe it's just assumed by everyone
                    > that, unless it is
                    > > stated so, Equity actors need not apply. But hey,
                    > I'm the new guy.
                    > > There are other new guys and gals, too. Even some
                    > theatres that are
                    > > listed as Equity-employing theatres, in the
                    > regional theatre
                    > > directory, I have found not to be so.
                    > >
                    > > As far as pay-you don't even have to list
                    > specifics-just say if
                    > > there is any pay or not. Again, I know there ain't
                    > a whole lotta'
                    > > beans to go around, so maybe it's assumed that,
                    > unless otherwise
                    > > stated, no pay. But I know there are paying jobs
                    > out there, so...
                    > >
                    > > In the end, if this info is still missing, I will
                    > ALWAYS choose to
                    > > audition-risking the chance I get a part I don't
                    > want/can't take.
                    > > Better that than NOT to audition and find out
                    > later I DID want
                    > > it/COULD HAVE taken it. So, as long as you don't
                    > mind spending 2
                    > > minutes watching me do my monologue, we're cool.
                    > >
                    > > John San Nicolas
                    > > AKA Johnny St. Nick
                    > > AKA Elliot Ruiz
                    > > AKA The San Diego Chargers Are the Greatest Sports
                    > Organization In
                    > > World History
                    > > AKA Not Really But a Guy Can Dream
                    > > AKA My Stomach Hurts From Thanksgiving Day
                    > Gluttony
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                    > --------------------
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                  • David Heath
                    Interesting story, and the first time I ve heard of anything like this. I d almost be willing to bet money that theatre doesn t exist any more (you did say it
                    Message 9 of 21 , Dec 2, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Interesting story, and the first time I've heard of anything like this. I'd almost be willing to bet money that theatre doesn't exist any more (you did say it was several years ago).
                       
                      I can (sort of) see how a director trying to put a show together might leave a message on somebody's machine (maybe the wrong somebody) and space the fact that s/he never got a response. But some time before the first rehearsal, even in the most minimally professional organization, the stage manager should be contacting everyone, making sure they have a copy of the script, asking if there are conflicts, emailing (assuming it wasn't TOO many years ago) rehearsal schedules, contact list, yadda yadda yadda.
                       
                      The fact that this doesn't seem to have happened in your spouse's case tells me that either this anonymous theatre didn't have a SM or the one they did have was a total incompetent. In any case, it's probably best to avoid having anything to do with such an "organization." And if they think somebody's a flake, who cares?
                       
                      David
                       
                      Just to add a little flavor and chuckle to this good conversation, I have a pet peeve:

                      You've been cast in a show, but NO ONE from the theatre informed you that you had been cast.  And they assume since you didn't show up at initial rehearsal that  you weren't interested in the role!  Assume?!  There wasn't even a phone call to say; hey, where were you?, what's going on?, etc.  This wasn't any small time theatre; it was a very reputable professional theatre here in Portland.  I know this is very RARE, but it did happen to my lovely wife Dee several years ago.  There wasn't even so much as an apology.  I mean, good God; it's hard enough to wonder if you'll be called back or cast and to debate whether or no you should call, but to BE CAST and NOT notified is the worst possible thing!!!  Yikes! 

                      I know this doesn't help the dialogue much but I thought I'd entertain you all.

                      Joe

                    • Deborah Lee
                      It is unfortunate, but true. It s been going on in L.A. for years in certain clubs that you have to pay to play thee. Another example of musicians being taken
                      Message 10 of 21 , Dec 3, 2005
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                        It is unfortunate, but true. It's been going on in L.A. for years in certain clubs that you have to pay to play thee. Another example of musicians being taken advantage of, but let's not go there. . .
                        On the subject of auditions, callbacks, etc., indeed, I was one of the persons who did not get a call from A.R.T. saying what time my Assassins audition was. I called back the day of, well before the 1:00 start time, but no response. My assumption was that they got so overwhelmed with calls that they could not call everyone back except the ones who called earlier in the week. I have no idea, and, fortunately, my voice lesson for that week, and my accompanist practice session, both of which I paid for, were not a complete waste of time. I have a song ready now to perform at some other theatre, but you can be certain it will be a while before I ask to audition at Artists Rep.  No bad feelings, just moving on . . .
                            On another note, it is really nice after an audition to get a call -- or email -- stating whether or not I've been cast. It takes away the worry; but I realize that some theatres go by the adage, "if you haven't heard from us, you haven't been cast."  This lack of a definite Y or N is disconcerting, but after giving it a week or two, that is indeed what I assume -- that I have not been cast. After all, my phone # and email address are all right there on my resume.
                            Cheers,
                            Deborah Lee
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: 12/1/05 12:36:05 PM
                        Subject: Re: [pdxbackstage] Audition information, Pet Peeve, and professional courtesy

                        Speaking of the stuff about paid/not paid, I agree it's worth letting people know. I know I don't search for gigs strictly on that basis, but it is a courtesy to inform.

                        Here's what really got me: I set up an audition, prepared my piece, did all that stuff, etc.--then well into the whole thing worrying about it I found out that not only did it not pay, but I HAD TO PAY TO PARTICIPATE!! This was a music gig, not a theatre gig, but I really think if there's payment involved on the part of the performer it should be indicated in the initial audition notice.
                        Dana Meadows-Hawthorne

                        On 12/1/05, Kevin Scott <kevinnscott@...> wrote:
                        One piece of professional courtesy that might be helpful to new folk
                        (and those who have been out of touch for a while, which would include
                        me), and which, so far I have seen put into practice in just one
                        theatre: the now long-gone and totally Equity-actor-run NYC Equity
                        Library Theatre

                        ELT posted in the actors'  waiting area a list of the folk who would
                        be sitting at the table (and the piano, if applicable) in the audition
                        room, together with COPIES OF ALL THEIR R�SUM�S -- as Steve Alexander
                        pointed out in his post under "[pdxbackstage] Audition information, et
                        cetera" at 8:54 PM on Nov 30, research is a very good thing, and more
                        than arguably part of the actor's responsibility, but it's not easy to
                        research people when you do not know who they are, and those in charge
                        of getting the actors slotted and in and out may be too busy handling
                        those logistics to get around to sharing all of that information.

                        I long ago decided that when I am in charge of running the auditions,
                        I would try to follow ELT's admirable practice, and wish that more
                        production companies would.

                        Kevin Scott
                        kevinnscott@...
                        www.geocities.com/k_n_scott


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                      • David J. Loftus
                        The perpetual ³angry young man of science fiction² turns 72 in April, so ³Story Time for Grownups² will feature short stories and other writings of Harlan
                        Message 11 of 21 , Mar 29, 2006
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                          "Story Time" to feature Harlan Ellison

                          The perpetual ³angry young man of science fiction² turns 72 in April, so ³Story Time for Grownups² will feature short stories and other writings of Harlan Ellison, read by David Loftus at Grendel¹s Coffee House, 729 E. Burnside, 503-595-9550, at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, April 3, 2006. Admission is free.

                          Though Ellison was in the chorus of the original Broadway cast of ³Kismet,² once shared a cabaret stage with young Barbra Streisand, reported on tour with Three Dog Night, marched with Martin Luther King from Montgomery to Selma, has done stand-up comedy, and won more Hollywood Writers Guild awards for solo TV work than any other scenarist . . .

                          . . . he is best known for writing the most famous episode of the original ³Star Trek² series, ³City on the Edge of Forever,² in which Kirk, Spock, and McCoy travel back in time to Depression-era Chicago, Kirk falls in love with a Salvation Army nurse played by Joan Collins, and he must choose between her and the survival of the universe. Ellison also authored the novella ³A Boy and His Dog,² a kinky post-apocalyptic tale of mayhem, rape, and cannibalism that became a cult movie starring the then-unknown Don Johnson.

                          Unlike most writers, Ellison's life has been as exciting and varied as anything he has written -- from running away from home to join a carnival at 13 to driving a dynamite truck at 15; from joining a Brooklyn street gang at 20 to research his first novel to being rescued from death in the desert by Steve McQueen. Along with some fiction, Loftus will read hilarious and true Ellison adventures such as the time he appeared on ³The Dating Game.² (Trust me, it wasn't pretty.)

                          Loftus photographed Ellison in 1982, interviewed him in 1984, and proofread and fact checked two of his recent books, Edgeworks Vol. 3 and Slippage in 1997-98. Later this year Loftus will index the latest editions of The Glass Teat and The Other Glass Teat, Ellison¹s classic columns of TV criticism that originally ran in the Los Angeles Free Press between 1968 and 1972.

                          Loftus is currently appearing as defense counsel Herbert Marks in NW Classical Theatre¹s production of ³In the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheimer,² showing Thursdays through Sundays through April 15.

                          On Monday, April 10, Loftus will read some of his own poems and other writings at the downtown Portland Borders Books.

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