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Re: [pcgen_international] Copyright issues

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  • Frank Kliewe
    ... You ll need to do your own translation of the terms used in the RSRD. I think the translation that is used in the books is part of the copyrighted material
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 26, 2007
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      On 3/26/07, Sergio Senosiain <seseca@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks for your answer but i'm still in doubt, that were not the main issue.
      > I mean, i know i can legally translate the RSRD, but can i use in the
      > translation exactly the same skills, equipments, races, feats, etc names
      > that translated PHB, DMG and MM use?
      >

      You'll need to do your own translation of the terms used in the RSRD.
      I think the translation that is used in the books is part of the
      copyrighted material of the publisher who holds the rights to D&D, so
      you cannot use it.

      With the books you will run into 2 problems where it comes to translation:

      - 1st there are some names that are not Open Game Content in the form
      they are used in the book, but have been renamed in the english RSRD.
      They need to have different names in your translation as well.

      - 2nd Some translations in the books will not be literal translations,
      but will use some freedom to better keep the spirit of the genre in
      your language. As the translation in the books is part of non-open
      material, you cannot use these terms but will have to come up with
      your own translation.

      What you should do is translate the RSRD using your own words, and
      where a feat or a skill then is the same as in the official
      translation you can use that, but you will end up with quite a few
      differences in names beween your own and the official translation.

      Cheerio,

      Frank Kliewe
      PCGen Content Silverback

      --
      I don't make things difficult. That's the way they get, all by themselves.
      (Martin Riggs in "Lethal Weapon", 1986)
    • seseca
      Thanks a lot, perfectly clear now. ... main issue. ... in the ... etc names ... RSRD. ... so ... form ... RSRD. ... translations, ... themselves.
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 27, 2007
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        Thanks a lot, perfectly clear now.

        --- In pcgen_international@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Kliewe"
        <fkliewe@...> wrote:
        >
        > On 3/26/07, Sergio Senosiain <seseca@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Thanks for your answer but i'm still in doubt, that were not the
        main issue.
        > > I mean, i know i can legally translate the RSRD, but can i use
        in the
        > > translation exactly the same skills, equipments, races, feats,
        etc names
        > > that translated PHB, DMG and MM use?
        > >
        >
        > You'll need to do your own translation of the terms used in the
        RSRD.
        > I think the translation that is used in the books is part of the
        > copyrighted material of the publisher who holds the rights to D&D,
        so
        > you cannot use it.
        >
        > With the books you will run into 2 problems where it comes to
        translation:
        >
        > - 1st there are some names that are not Open Game Content in the
        form
        > they are used in the book, but have been renamed in the english
        RSRD.
        > They need to have different names in your translation as well.
        >
        > - 2nd Some translations in the books will not be literal
        translations,
        > but will use some freedom to better keep the spirit of the genre in
        > your language. As the translation in the books is part of non-open
        > material, you cannot use these terms but will have to come up with
        > your own translation.
        >
        > What you should do is translate the RSRD using your own words, and
        > where a feat or a skill then is the same as in the official
        > translation you can use that, but you will end up with quite a few
        > differences in names beween your own and the official translation.
        >
        > Cheerio,
        >
        > Frank Kliewe
        > PCGen Content Silverback
        >
        > --
        > I don't make things difficult. That's the way they get, all by
        themselves.
        > (Martin Riggs in "Lethal Weapon", 1986)
        >
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