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[freq] store datasets in a zip archive

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  • Eric Jarman
    I thought that a good way for a vendor to distribute datasets would be as a zip file that the user could just drop into the appropriate directory ( data/,
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 10, 2005
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      I thought that a good way for a vendor to distribute datasets would be
      as a zip file that the user could just drop into the appropriate
      directory ( data/, vendordata/, or whatever) that pcgen would just pick
      up and run with so that there would be no confusion for any new users as
      to how to install a dataset, and they wouldn't have to worry about
      overwriting or replacing any files when they buy a new dataset.

      The archive file could contain pcc files, lst files, output sheets, or
      gamemode files.

      Ideally, the gui interface could treat the zip file the same way XP does
      (as if it were a normal directory).

      Any thoughts?
    • Devon Jones
      ... Likely we would do this as jar instead of a zip, but yeah - it s not hard either way. I m for it. Devon
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 11, 2005
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        Eric Jarman wrote:

        >I thought that a good way for a vendor to distribute datasets would be
        >as a zip file that the user could just drop into the appropriate
        >directory ( data/, vendordata/, or whatever) that pcgen would just pick
        >up and run with so that there would be no confusion for any new users as
        >to how to install a dataset, and they wouldn't have to worry about
        >overwriting or replacing any files when they buy a new dataset.
        >
        >The archive file could contain pcc files, lst files, output sheets, or
        >gamemode files.
        >
        >Ideally, the gui interface could treat the zip file the same way XP does
        >(as if it were a normal directory).
        >
        >Any thoughts?
        >
        >
        Likely we would do this as jar instead of a zip, but yeah - it's not
        hard either way.

        I'm for it.

        Devon
      • David M. Bebber
        On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 11:42:52 -0500, Devon Jones ... I personally like the 7z format as it crunches down real nice... (see the 7z
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 11, 2005
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          On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 11:42:52 -0500, Devon Jones <soulcatcher@...>
          wrote:

          > Likely we would do this as jar instead of a zip, but yeah - it's not
          > hard either way.
          >
          > I'm for it.
          >
          > Devon

          I personally like the 7z format as it crunches down real nice... (see the
          7z project @ sourceforge)

          Data directory --> 10.6 Mb (Oof!)
          Data.Zip --> 2.68 Mb (Much better)
          Data.7z --> 1.16 Mb (That's what I'm talkin about!)

          I absolutely like the idea of having a single source book be a single item
          (1 file == 1 book), and the space savings would rock too as I carry my
          PCGen on my 128 Mb USB thumbdrive for ease of use anywhere I may roam...
          but please ensure that the ability to use noncompressed lsts remains.


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        • thaldorf
          ... (see the ... JAR (http://www.arjsoftware.com/jar.htm) is another very good data compressor the same data file is converted to a 1.03 MB file.
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 11, 2005
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            > I personally like the 7z format as it crunches down real nice...
            (see the
            > 7z project @ sourceforge)
            >
            > Data directory --> 10.6 Mb (Oof!)
            > Data.Zip --> 2.68 Mb (Much better)
            > Data.7z --> 1.16 Mb (That's what I'm talkin about!)
            >
            JAR (http://www.arjsoftware.com/jar.htm) is another very good data
            compressor the same data file is converted to a 1.03 MB file.
          • Brian
            here s a quick question then, what program is good for making .jar files? ... From: thaldorf Date: 06/11/05 22:14:01 To: pcgen@yahoogroups.com Subject: [TM]Re:
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 11, 2005
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              here's a quick question then, what program is good for making .jar files?

              -------Original Message-------

              From: thaldorf
              Date: 06/11/05 22:14:01
              To: pcgen@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [TM]Re: [pcgen] [freq] store datasets in a zip archive


              > I personally like the 7z format as it crunches down real nice...
              (see the
              > 7z project @ sourceforge)
              >
              > Data directory --> 10.6 Mb (Oof!)
              > Data.Zip --> 2.68 Mb (Much better)
              > Data.7z --> 1.16 Mb (That's what I'm talkin about!)
              >
              JAR (http://www.arjsoftware.com/jar.htm) is another very good data
              compressor the same data file is converted to a 1.03 MB file.




              PCGen's release site: http://pcgen.sourceforge.net
              PCGen's alpha build: http://www.legolas.org/pcgen/autobuilds
              PCGen's FAQ:
              http://www.evilsoft.org/pcgen/docs/




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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Eric Jarman
              ... We will need to use a format that has a fully java implementation in order to maintain portability across platforms. 7z appears to be written only in C++,
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 12, 2005
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                thaldorf wrote:

                >>I personally like the 7z format as it crunches down real nice...
                >>
                >>
                >(see the
                >
                >
                >>7z project @ sourceforge)
                >>
                >>Data directory --> 10.6 Mb (Oof!)
                >>Data.Zip --> 2.68 Mb (Much better)
                >>Data.7z --> 1.16 Mb (That's what I'm talkin about!)
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >JAR (http://www.arjsoftware.com/jar.htm) is another very good data
                >compressor the same data file is converted to a 1.03 MB file.
                >
                >
                We will need to use a format that has a fully java implementation in
                order to maintain portability across platforms. 7z appears to be
                written only in C++, and arj-jar is only available for windows, and is
                closed source, so we couldn't use it.

                The java.util.zip package provides support for everything zlib supports
                (gzip, zip, and java jar files), so we get support for all those for
                free with jdk 1.4.2 and better.
              • Truth
                ... At the bottom of the 7z SDK page (http://www.7-zip.org/sdk.html) there is a link labelled LZMA SDK for Java which links to:
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 13, 2005
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                  On 6/12/05, Eric Jarman <ehj38230@...> wrote:
                  > We will need to use a format that has a fully java implementation in
                  > order to maintain portability across platforms. 7z appears to be
                  > written only in C++, and arj-jar is only available for windows, and is
                  > closed source, so we couldn't use it.

                  At the bottom of the 7z SDK page (http://www.7-zip.org/sdk.html) there
                  is a link labelled LZMA SDK for Java which links to:
                  http://sourceforge.net/projects/p7zip/

                  --
                  Truth.
                  There is no religion higher than the Truth.
                • Eric Jarman
                  ... And it s LGPL too, sweet! Well, I think that we should support as many possible archive formats as we can, to make it easier on the users. I think we
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 14, 2005
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                    Truth wrote:
                    > On 6/12/05, Eric Jarman <ehj38230@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >>We will need to use a format that has a fully java implementation in
                    >>order to maintain portability across platforms. 7z appears to be
                    >>written only in C++, and arj-jar is only available for windows, and is
                    >>closed source, so we couldn't use it.
                    >
                    >
                    > At the bottom of the 7z SDK page (http://www.7-zip.org/sdk.html) there
                    > is a link labelled LZMA SDK for Java which links to:
                    > http://sourceforge.net/projects/p7zip/
                    >

                    And it's LGPL too, sweet!
                    Well, I think that we should support as many possible archive formats as
                    we can, to make it easier on the users.

                    I think we should make a generic "archive file reader" in the lowest
                    layer of the input parser that would be able to open zip, jar, tar,
                    tar.gz, tar.bz2, and 7zip. (And maybe eventually we could use java1.5's
                    pack200 format, which compresses with gzip.)

                    It would be arranged something like:

                    filereader
                    | |
                    archive-filereader plain-filereader
                    | | | |
                    zip jar 7z tar______
                    | |
                    tar.gz tar.bz2

                    Then, when the parser needed to find a file, it would just ask the
                    filereader for it, and the filereader would have to give back the
                    correct data from wherever it found it. So, when an upper layer would
                    request a file, the filereader would pass back an InputStream that would
                    be filtered through whatever archive parsers were needed to transform it
                    back into raw data. It would also have to handle archive indexes for
                    directory structure for finding files. The only format I forsee
                    problems with on that end is tar, since you have to read the entire
                    archive file to know what all of its contents are, so it would waste a
                    lot of memory and be pretty slow.
                    Perhaps we should take a vote on which archive formats we would like?

                    I'll have to start looking more at the code to figure out just what kind
                    of changes might be necessary to start making this kind of architecture
                    possible. Since there's already the ability to search through multiple
                    directories for a datafile (/data vs /vendordata), perhaps some of it is
                    already there...
                  • Paul W. King
                    [ 1223158 ] store datasets in a zip archive http://sourceforge.net/tracker/index.php?func=detail&aid=1223158&group_id=25576&atid=384722 Paul W. King TM SB,
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 18, 2005
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                      [ 1223158 ] store datasets in a zip archive
                      http://sourceforge.net/tracker/index.php?func=detail&aid=1223158&group_id=25576&atid=384722

                      Paul W. King
                      TM SB, OGL/PL Chimp, Data Gibbon, BoD
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