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Offensive Line

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  • Randy Z Pierce
    It seems from the manner in which our offensive line is sustained that perhaps our coaching staff and front office have come to a conclusion. Trying to build
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 5, 2004
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      It seems from the manner in which our offensive line is sustained that perhaps our  coaching staff and front office have come to a conclusion.  Trying to build anything approaching a dominant offensive line is challenging as they are financially expensive and a single point of weakness destroys the value of the unit on many instances.  The offensive line more than any group must perform as a unit to correctly handle all the shifting assignments and provide either QB pass protection or running lanes.  A strong side can build a running game for a short bit but ultimately teams can readily stack to address this type of tendency.  Given that it requires such a strong entirety and knowing the cost of such, the Patriots build around the strength of other avenues and seek a base competency across the board on their offensive line.  There are absolutely no dominant offensive linemen remaining in this group.  As such I'd wager they are the lower priced units for this league.  Money which is spent elsewhere and thus they must work around the deficiencies with the rest of their Offensive unit.  Brady reading the pocket so well to maximize the use of the line's pass block.  Weiss using an array of schemes to keep a defense less prepared for what might come from the group.  We struggle in short yardage run attempts because the unit is sub par (imo) but overall we move the chains because we are difficult to predict in short yardage situations.  We use formations which use shifting Tight Ends and receivers to outnumber the holes into which we are running.  We play off our own tendencies to surprise the opponent about our attack. 
       
      So my questions are:
      1( Do we deliberately downplay our O-line as I surmise above?
       
      2) Is this a proper choic in todays NFL  or is it simply just an unattacked approach at present?
       
      Zip
       
    • George R
      ***** You re right on with this, Zip! All I would add is that the additions of Watson and Dillon are going to add to the effectiveness of this well coached,
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 5, 2004
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        ***** You're right on with this, Zip! All I would add is that the additions of Watson and Dillon are going to add to the effectiveness of this well coached, over-achieving unit. Charlie will have many more options with 3 quality TEs. He'll likely make more use of 2 TE and H-back sets, and benefit from the pure level of talent increase with Dillon at RB.
         
        ***** This year's offense, despite its bargain basement OL, will be noticably improved over last year's. That, plus a similar improvement in our D, due primarily to the DL, and in our STs, due to an NFL quality punter and a healthy Vinatieri, sets us up for what I believe will be the best Patriots team ever.
         
        ***** As for your questions, I believe that your theory on the subordination of the OL's role to the complexity of our game plan, I agree. I believe that its success is because this approach is, as you term it, "unattacked". The only way that it can be attacked, IMO, is for a defense to mirror both the unpredictable plans and the football intelligence level of our defense. Without that combination, our complex offensive schemes, and the consistently good decisions made by our QB will ultimately overcome any opposing defense. It may not overwhelm an opponent throughout a game, but, when the game hangs in the balance in the 4th quarter, and a drive is needed to secure a victory, our versatility and intelligence, on the field and off, will be there to get that deciding score.
         
        George

        Randy Z Pierce <alaric02@...> wrote:
        It seems from the manner in which our offensive line is sustained that perhaps our  coaching staff and front office have come to a conclusion.  Trying to build anything approaching a dominant offensive line is challenging as they are financially expensive and a single point of weakness destroys the value of the unit on many instances.  The offensive line more than any group must perform as a unit to correctly handle all the shifting assignments and provide either QB pass protection or running lanes.  A strong side can build a running game for a short bit but ultimately teams can readily stack to address this type of tendency.  Given that it requires such a strong entirety and knowing the cost of such, the Patriots build around the strength of other avenues and seek a base competency across the board on their offensive line.  There are absolutely no dominant offensive linemen remaining in this group.  As such I'd wager they are the lower priced units for this league.  Money which is spent elsewhere and thus they must work around the deficiencies with the rest of their Offensive unit.  Brady reading the pocket so well to maximize the use of the line's pass block.  Weiss using an array of schemes to keep a defense less prepared for what might come from the group.  We struggle in short yardage run attempts because the unit is sub par (imo) but overall we move the chains because we are difficult to predict in short yardage situations.  We use formations which use shifting Tight Ends and receivers to outnumber the holes into which we are running.  We play off our own tendencies to surprise the opponent about our attack. 
         
        So my questions are:
        1( Do we deliberately downplay our O-line as I surmise above?
         
        2) Is this a proper choic in todays NFL  or is it simply just an unattacked approach at present?
         
        Zip
         


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        ** Belichick IS NFL Coach of the Year! **
        ** & The Patriots dynasty has begun! **


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      • Randy Z Pierce
        Hey George - I m not sure I can agree with the part of your post which claims an improvement at DL. I do like the picks and think Traylor was a good signing
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 5, 2004
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          Hey George -
             
                      I'm not sure I can agree with the part of your post which claims an improvement at DL.  I do like the picks and think Traylor was a good signing but the loss of Washington and Hamilton was the loss of two known commodities who both performed well for us especially at key times.  I don't think we are in trouble there but I an't quite call it an improvement as you refer.
           
          Zip
          c
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: George R
          Sent: Saturday, June 05, 2004 12:34 PM
          Subject: Re: [patriotzip] Offensive Line

          ***** You're right on with this, Zip! All I would add is that the additions of Watson and Dillon are going to add to the effectiveness of this well coached, over-achieving unit. Charlie will have many more options with 3 quality TEs. He'll likely make more use of 2 TE and H-back sets, and benefit from the pure level of talent increase with Dillon at RB.
           
          ***** This year's offense, despite its bargain basement OL, will be noticably improved over last year's. That, plus a similar improvement in our D, due primarily to the DL, and in our STs, due to an NFL quality punter and a healthy Vinatieri, sets us up for what I believe will be the best Patriots team ever.
           
          ***** As for your questions, I believe that your theory on the subordination of the OL's role to the complexity of our game plan, I agree. I believe that its success is because this approach is, as you term it, "unattacked". The only way that it can be attacked, IMO, is for a defense to mirror both the unpredictable plans and the football intelligence level of our defense. Without that combination, our complex offensive schemes, and the consistently good decisions made by our QB will ultimately overcome any opposing defense. It may not overwhelm an opponent throughout a game, but, when the game hangs in the balance in the 4th quarter, and a drive is needed to secure a victory, our versatility and intelligence, on the field and off, will be there to get that deciding score.
           
          George

          Randy Z Pierce <alaric02@...> wrote:
          It seems from the manner in which our offensive line is sustained that perhaps our  coaching staff and front office have come to a conclusion.  Trying to build anything approaching a dominant offensive line is challenging as they are financially expensive and a single point of weakness destroys the value of the unit on many instances.  The offensive line more than any group must perform as a unit to correctly handle all the shifting assignments and provide either QB pass protection or running lanes.  A strong side can build a running game for a short bit but ultimately teams can readily stack to address this type of tendency.  Given that it requires such a strong entirety and knowing the cost of such, the Patriots build around the strength of other avenues and seek a base competency across the board on their offensive line.  There are absolutely no dominant offensive linemen remaining in this group.  As such I'd wager they are the lower priced units for this league.  Money which is spent elsewhere and thus they must work around the deficiencies with the rest of their Offensive unit.  Brady reading the pocket so well to maximize the use of the line's pass block.  Weiss using an array of schemes to keep a defense less prepared for what might come from the group.  We struggle in short yardage run attempts because the unit is sub par (imo) but overall we move the chains because we are difficult to predict in short yardage situations.  We use formations which use shifting Tight Ends and receivers to outnumber the holes into which we are running.  We play off our own tendencies to surprise the opponent about our attack. 
           
          So my questions are:
          1( Do we deliberately downplay our O-line as I surmise above?
           
          2) Is this a proper choic in todays NFL  or is it simply just an unattacked approach at present?
           
          Zip
           


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          George
          ** Belichick IS NFL Coach of the Year! **
          ** & The Patriots dynasty has begun! **


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        • George R
          ***** I understand your caution, Zip. But I personally believe that the added maturity of Seymour, Warren, and Green, combined with the additons of vets
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 5, 2004
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            ***** I understand your caution, Zip. But I personally believe that the added maturity of Seymour, Warren, and Green, combined with the additons of vets Traylor and Bailey and the new kids, Wilfork and Hill, give us more depth and flexibility than we had last season. Don't forget the fact that Washington, as effective as he was for a few dozen plays at critical times, was very much a part time contributor to our DL. Hamiliton, as much as I loved his attitude and effort, was also limited in his skill set.
             
            ***** I respected and appreciated what both of those guys did for us last season. I'll be happy to applaud loudly when they get their well earned and deserved rings in a couple of weeks. But I think that the combination of Traylor and Wilfork will replace Washington very effectively, as will the combination of Bailey and Hill replace Hamilton. Warren and Green are added "wild cards" for what I know will be unprecedented flexibility and rotation benefits for this unique DL. "My man" Seymour, of course, remains the core of it all.
             
            ***** I stand firmly behind my belief that this DL is improved over last year's edition. And I'll state further that it will continue to improve over the next couple of years as these young players gain experience.
             
            George

            Randy Z Pierce <alaric02@...> wrote:
            Hey George -
               
                        I'm not sure I can agree with the part of your post which claims an improvement at DL.  I do like the picks and think Traylor was a good signing but the loss of Washington and Hamilton was the loss of two known commodities who both performed well for us especially at key times.  I don't think we are in trouble there but I an't quite call it an improvement as you refer.
             
            Zip
            c
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: George R
            Sent: Saturday, June 05, 2004 12:34 PM
            Subject: Re: [patriotzip] Offensive Line

            ***** You're right on with this, Zip! All I would add is that the additions of Watson and Dillon are going to add to the effectiveness of this well coached, over-achieving unit. Charlie will have many more options with 3 quality TEs. He'll likely make more use of 2 TE and H-back sets, and benefit from the pure level of talent increase with Dillon at RB.
             
            ***** This year's offense, despite its bargain basement OL, will be noticably improved over last year's. That, plus a similar improvement in our D, due primarily to the DL, and in our STs, due to an NFL quality punter and a healthy Vinatieri, sets us up for what I believe will be the best Patriots team ever.
             
            ***** As for your questions, I believe that your theory on the subordination of the OL's role to the complexity of our game plan, I agree. I believe that its success is because this approach is, as you term it, "unattacked". The only way that it can be attacked, IMO, is for a defense to mirror both the unpredictable plans and the football intelligence level of our defense. Without that combination, our complex offensive schemes, and the consistently good decisions made by our QB will ultimately overcome any opposing defense. It may not overwhelm an opponent throughout a game, but, when the game hangs in the balance in the 4th quarter, and a drive is needed to secure a victory, our versatility and intelligence, on the field and off, will be there to get that deciding score.
             
            George

            Randy Z Pierce <alaric02@...> wrote:
            It seems from the manner in which our offensive line is sustained that perhaps our  coaching staff and front office have come to a conclusion.  Trying to build anything approaching a dominant offensive line is challenging as they are financially expensive and a single point of weakness destroys the value of the unit on many instances.  The offensive line more than any group must perform as a unit to correctly handle all the shifting assignments and provide either QB pass protection or running lanes.  A strong side can build a running game for a short bit but ultimately teams can readily stack to address this type of tendency.  Given that it requires such a strong entirety and knowing the cost of such, the Patriots build around the strength of other avenues and seek a base competency across the board on their offensive line.  There are absolutely no dominant offensive linemen remaining in this group.  As such I'd wager they are the lower priced units for this league.  Money which is spent elsewhere and thus they must work around the deficiencies with the rest of their Offensive unit.  Brady reading the pocket so well to maximize the use of the line's pass block.  Weiss using an array of schemes to keep a defense less prepared for what might come from the group.  We struggle in short yardage run attempts because the unit is sub par (imo) but overall we move the chains because we are difficult to predict in short yardage situations.  We use formations which use shifting Tight Ends and receivers to outnumber the holes into which we are running.  We play off our own tendencies to surprise the opponent about our attack. 
             
            So my questions are:
            1( Do we deliberately downplay our O-line as I surmise above?
             
            2) Is this a proper choic in todays NFL  or is it simply just an unattacked approach at present?
             
            Zip
             


            To unsubscribe from Zip's New England Patriots Fan Group, send an email to:
            patriotzip-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com




            George
            ** Belichick IS NFL Coach of the Year! **
            ** & The Patriots dynasty has begun! **


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