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Wildcat White

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  • kmacalp@aol.com
    I also think the Pats need to beware a new wildcat wrinkle involving Pat White, but whereas Tedy Bruschi has brought up White s passing ability, there s
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 8, 2009
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      I also think the Pats need to beware a new wildcat wrinkle involving Pat White, but whereas Tedy Bruschi has brought up White's passing ability, there's another big concern. Remember, the wildcat is really the old single wing offense. Traditionally, the fullback handles the ball on most plays whether he keeps it himself, hands it off or passes it. It's best to have a player who is a good runner between the tackles. Miami's Brown can handle shotgun snaps, run between the tackles, hand off and throw well.
       
      Despite his arm, there are a few factors which limit him as a passing threat.
       
      1. He doesn't have a QB's passing experience, so he's probably not throwing unless he's absolutely sure it's open. That minimizes, but it doesn't eliminate him as a passing threat.
       
      2. The QB shifts out as receiver. With Pennington and Henne, Brown loses a truly viable receiver. Chad Pennington and Chan Henne will be open if a defense totally ignores them, but neither guy can beat most NFL defensive backs or linebackers.
       
      Pat White has the speed and athletic ability to beat defensive backs and linebackers. Leaving him uncovered would be devastating for defenses. Plus, he's more dangerous than Henne and Pennington on an end around. So yeah, White, an experienced QB is a threat throwing the ball, but beware him as a receiving threat too.
       
      Another danger. Imitating Denver's wild horses. Remember how  Orton kept going in motion and ending up under center to throw against simplified coverages? White poses a double threat doing that. He could stop and pass like Orton OR he could use his speed around the end on a run.
       
      Scott Sheaffer
    • Mark Morse
      We should have drafted him like we were supposed to!  That was a pure option look (ala Steve Grogan).  
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 8, 2009
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        We should have drafted him like we were supposed to!  That was a pure option look (ala Steve Grogan).
         
        <font face="comic sans ms" color="#438059" size="5">Mark </font>



        From: "kmacalp@..." <kmacalp@...>
        To: patriotzip@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, November 8, 2009 9:58:56 AM
        Subject: [patriotzip] Wildcat White

         

        I also think the Pats need to beware a new wildcat wrinkle involving Pat White, but whereas Tedy Bruschi has brought up White's passing ability, there's another big concern. Remember, the wildcat is really the old single wing offense. Traditionally, the fullback handles the ball on most plays whether he keeps it himself, hands it off or passes it. It's best to have a player who is a good runner between the tackles. Miami's Brown can handle shotgun snaps, run between the tackles, hand off and throw well.
         
        Despite his arm, there are a few factors which limit him as a passing threat.
         
        1. He doesn't have a QB's passing experience, so he's probably not throwing unless he's absolutely sure it's open. That minimizes, but it doesn't eliminate him as a passing threat.
         
        2. The QB shifts out as receiver. With Pennington and Henne, Brown loses a truly viable receiver. Chad Pennington and Chan Henne will be open if a defense totally ignores them, but neither guy can beat most NFL defensive backs or linebackers.
         
        Pat White has the speed and athletic ability to beat defensive backs and linebackers. Leaving him uncovered would be devastating for defenses. Plus, he's more dangerous than Henne and Pennington on an end around. So yeah, White, an experienced QB is a threat throwing the ball, but beware him as a receiving threat too.
         
        Another danger. Imitating Denver's wild horses. Remember how  Orton kept going in motion and ending up under center to throw against simplified coverages? White poses a double threat doing that. He could stop and pass like Orton OR he could use his speed around the end on a run.
         
        Scott Sheaffer

      • George
        It can definitely be an effective change of pace. But we all know that a running QB can t last long in the NFL. That s especially true of a little guy like
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 8, 2009
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          It can definitely be an effective change of pace. But we all know that a running QB can't last long in the NFL. That's especially true of a little guy like White. Still, if they continue to use him as part of their three different sets, the Dolphins will continue to be very tough on defensive coordinators. Preparation is tough enough against one offense. Preparing for three significantly different offenses has to be a nightmare.

          George

           


          From: patriotzip@yahoogroups.com [mailto:patriotzip@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Morse
          Sent: Monday, November 09, 2009 8:01 AM
          To: patriotzip@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [patriotzip] Wildcat White

           

          We should have drafted him like we were supposed to!  That was a pure option look (ala Steve Grogan).
           
          <font face="comic sans ms" color="#438059" size="5">Mark </font>



          From: "kmacalp@aol. com" <kmacalp@aol. com>
          To: patriotzip@yahoogro ups.com
          Sent: Sun, November 8, 2009 9:58:56 AM
          Subject: [patriotzip] Wildcat White[GLR* ] It  

           

          I also think the Pats need to beware a new wildcat wrinkle involving Pat White, but whereas Tedy Bruschi has brought up White's passing ability, there's another big concern. Remember, the wildcat is really the old single wing offense. Traditionally, the fullback handles the ball on most plays whether he keeps it himself, hands it off or passes it. It's best to have a player who is a good runner between the tackles. Miami's Brown can handle shotgun snaps, run between the tackles, hand off and throw well.
           
          Despite his arm, there are a few factors which limit him as a passing threat.
           
          1. He doesn't have a QB's passing experience, so he's probably not throwing unless he's absolutely sure it's open. That minimizes, but it doesn't eliminate him as a passing threat.
           
          2. The QB shifts out as receiver. With Pennington and Henne, Brown loses a truly viable receiver. Chad Pennington and Chan Henne will be open if a defense totally ignores them, but neither guy can beat most NFL defensive backs or linebackers.
           
          Pat White has the speed and athletic ability to beat defensive backs and linebackers. Leaving him uncovered would be devastating for defenses. Plus, he's more dangerous than Henne and Pennington on an end around. So yeah, White, an experienced QB is a threat throwing the ball, but beware him as a receiving threat too.
           
          Another danger. Imitating Denver's wild horses. Remember how  Orton kept going in motion and ending up under center to throw against simplified coverages? White poses a double threat doing that. He could stop and pass like Orton OR he could use his speed around the end on a run.
           
          Scott Sheaffer

        • kmacalp@aol.com
          They never used White as a receiver like I imagined. Even when Henne was out there, I noticed that a DB came out and covered him tightly. White had a few good
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 10, 2009
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            They never used White as a receiver like I imagined. Even when Henne was out there, I noticed that a DB came out and covered him tightly. White had a few good plays running the option. There was his own 33 yard run where he could have been dropped in the backfield for a loss. Then there was the pitch to Williams for the touchdown. We'll see the Dolphins again, so maybe they come up with something else new for the rematch.
             
            It would have been nice getting White on the roster, but didn't the Dolphins spend a high draft pick on him? I think we got a better bargain drafting Julian Edleman (also a college QB) late in the draft. Even though he's currently out with that arm injury, Edleman has already shown his value as a receiver, particularly as Welker's back up and as a return man. Plus maybe he has something to do with our decision to carry only two QBs.
             
            At times the defense struggled, but the Dolphins had scored 30 or more points four games in a row. The Pats held them to 17. So the end result was good, although it could have been better.
          • RandyZ. Pierce
            Great information to hear the Pats coverred Henne as a receiver, I wonder how they decided who would draw that assignment on each play and sure hope they
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 10, 2009
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              Great information to hear the Pats coverred Henne as a receiver, I wonder how they decided who would draw that
              assignment on each play and sure hope they weren't putting the top cover on him each time. I hadn't heard anyone break
              down that detail.

              I understand Tully having an uncertainty the first time he saw White and while he made the error they fixed that one
              quickly. The defensive series which did frustrate me was the first drive of the third quarter when it looked like they
              were just going to power over us for the rest of the day...again they adjusted a bit even though they were tired and
              our offense scored quickly. The key was how many third and shorts we allowed and how many we allowed them to convert.
              Four third and short and 1 fourth and short on that drive...mostly to the fullback.



              It wasn't the defenses best effort but they managed the wrinkles and held Miami to well below their average.

              Big challenge this week...and a very fun game ahead by all signs.

              Go Pats!
              Zip
            • the Shmoo
              A question: When Henne lines up at WR, would the cornerback on his side be allowed to jam him at the line, or even knock him on his ass? Isn t it true they
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 10, 2009
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                A question: When Henne lines up at WR, would the cornerback on his side be allowed to jam him at the line, or even knock him on his ass? Isn't it true they can touch (hit) the WR within the first 5 yards of the scrimmage line? If so, I say go ahead and knock him down a few times. Let's see how happy they are with that play then.
              • Ed Bryant
                Five yards for most of them, seven yards for Ty Law! ... From: the Shmoo Subject: [patriotzip] Re: Wildcat White To:
                Message 7 of 10 , Nov 10, 2009
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                  Five yards for most of them, seven yards for Ty Law!

                  --- On Tue, 11/10/09, the Shmoo <ps2dad@...> wrote:

                  From: the Shmoo <ps2dad@...>
                  Subject: [patriotzip] Re: Wildcat White
                  To: patriotzip@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, November 10, 2009, 4:16 PM

                   
                  A question: When Henne lines up at WR, would the cornerback on his side be allowed to jam him at the line, or even knock him on his ass? Isn't it true they can touch (hit) the WR within the first 5 yards of the scrimmage line? If so, I say go ahead and knock him down a few times. Let's see how happy they are with that play then.

                • RandyZ. Pierce
                  As Ed intimated, it is entirely legitimate to get very physical with the receiver at the line...even if that receiver is normally a Quarterback. They tend to
                  Message 8 of 10 , Nov 10, 2009
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                    As Ed intimated, it is entirely legitimate to get very physical with the receiver at the line...even if that receiver
                    is normally a Quarterback. They tend to be a little more cautious though and it's hard to have any worthy hit on
                    them...so ultimately it works well. Now when running the option...Tully should have levelled him.

                    Go Pats!
                    Zip

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "the Shmoo" <ps2dad@...>
                    To: <patriotzip@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, November 10, 2009 4:16 PM
                    Subject: [patriotzip] Re: Wildcat White


                    A question: When Henne lines up at WR, would the cornerback on his side be allowed to jam him at the line, or even
                    knock him on his ass? Isn't it true they can touch (hit) the WR within the first 5 yards of the scrimmage line? If
                    so, I say go ahead and knock him down a few times. Let's see how happy they are with that play then.




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                  • Steve Basile
                    I TOTALLY support this defensive strategy! And I don¹t get why it¹s not done more. Once a formerly well-protected QB gets his bell rung a few times by a
                    Message 9 of 10 , Nov 10, 2009
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                      Re: [patriotzip] Re:  Wildcat White I TOTALLY support this defensive strategy! And I don’t get why it’s not done more.

                      Once a formerly well-protected QB gets his bell rung a few times by a great big corner or lineman (usually kept away from him by his O-Line) I bet he’s not so eager to use that play and will tell his coach.

                      CLOBBER him.  Every chance we get.  Most of these guys are not used to taking big time hits.

                      Baze

                      --
                      Steve Basile
                      Manager
                      B.D. Riley's Irish Pub
                      Austin, TX
                      Official Home: Austin Patriots Club
                      Web: www.bdrileys.com





                      From: the Shmoo <ps2dad@...>
                      Reply-To: "patriotzip@yahoogroups.com" <patriotzip@yahoogroups.com>
                      Date: Tue, 10 Nov 2009 21:16:52 -0000
                      To: "patriotzip@yahoogroups.com" <patriotzip@yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: [patriotzip] Re:  Wildcat White

                       
                       
                       
                         

                      A question:  When Henne lines up at WR, would the cornerback on his side be allowed to jam him at the line, or even knock him on his ass?  Isn't it true they can touch (hit) the WR within the first 5 yards of the scrimmage line?  If so, I say go ahead and knock him down a few times.  Let's see how happy they are with that play then.

                       
                         


                    • kmacalp@aol.com
                      Great information to hear the Pats coverred Henne as a receiver, I wonder how they decided who would draw that assignment on each play and sure hope
                      Message 10 of 10 , Nov 13, 2009
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                        <Randy> Great information to hear the Pats coverred Henne as a receiver, I wonder how they decided who would draw that
                        assignment on each play and sure hope they weren't putting the top cover on him each time. I hadn't heard anyone break
                        down that detail.
                         
                        <Scott> I watched on TV so I was limited to what the camera showed. On the wildcat play where I noticed Henne being covered, the cover guy was Patrick Chung. Chung was right up in Henne's face, but I didn't see if Chung got a good jam on him or not.
                         
                        Scott Sheaffer  
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