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Re: 1997 Defended

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  • the Shmoo
    Scott is quite correct in his assessment of these two coaches and their similar coaching styles. As for the analysis of the 97 team, numbers do not lie. He
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 1, 2009
      Scott is quite correct in his assessment of these two coaches and their similar coaching styles. As for the analysis of the 97 team, numbers do not lie. He puts it out there in black & white. It would seem his argument is infallable.

      --- In patriotzip@yahoogroups.com, kmacalp@... wrote:
      >
      > Hi Randy,
      >
      > I'm not looking at a single loss, and saying that the single loss
      > constitutes a collapse all by itself. I'm looking at a 4-0 start, followed by a 7-7
      > record the rest of the way. (6-6 in the regular season. 1-1 in the
      > playoffs.) I'm looking at 14 games of mediocre football. That's the collapse, 4-0
      > (5-1 even) with easy, blowout wins, followed by .500 football.
      >
      > That's my point. I'm not saying the 97 team had no talent. They were loaded
      > with talent. I'm not saying it didn't have good people. Some of my
      > favorite players were on that team. My point is to say that Carroll and Ryan
      > employ similar coaching styles (not press conference styles), and I think
      > Carroll's approach had something to do with the late collapse pattern seen in all
      > 4 seasons he was an NFL head coach.
      >
      > Yes, bad drafts and horrible cap management played a role so that the team
      > was hamstrung on making quick improvements when Belichick came in.
      > Belichick didn't just inherit a team in cap trouble and a few bad drafts though. I
      > can't remember if I read it in Patriot Reign or The Blue Print, but when
      > he came back, he inherited a team where half the players couldn't finish
      > something which was a routine conditioning drill for Parcells's Jets, Pats,
      > and Giants teams. Guys were off to the side vomiting, unable to finish the
      > drill. Players had gotten used to lax rules and no discipline and some were
      > beyond salvage in this area. So, Belichick had to tear down and clear out
      > dead wood. It was a case of getting worse short term to get better long term.
      > (Something Cleveland ownership, media, and fans fiercely resisted when
      > Belichick attempted it there because they thought the aging players who'd just
      > missed the Super Bowl a few times were still "just around the corner" from
      > getting there.) The classic example is Jimmie Johnson's Dallas Cowboys.
      > Johnson came in and cleaned house, got rid of big name players. The team went
      > 1-15 his first year, but he set the foundation for 3 Super Bowl
      > Championships.
      >
      > I was heartbroken when that '97 team lost 7-6 too. I was aggravated by that
      > long Kordell Stewart run which I recall as the key play of the game. But
      > looking back at the big picture, I see it fits a pattern.
      >
      > Sincerely,
      > Scott Sheaffer
      >
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