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Awesome article about the single-wing/wildcat

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  • Rich Carreiro
    http://vault.sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1149161/index.htm -- Rich Carreiro rlcarr@rlcarr.com
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 5, 2008
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    • George
      ***** It was, indeed, a good article, Rich. Thanks for the post. I have a couple of points I d like to make about it. ***** The first is that it clearly showed
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 5, 2008
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        ***** It was, indeed, a good article, Rich. Thanks for the post. I have a couple of points I'd like to make about it.
         
        ***** The first is that it clearly showed that BB is well aware of the formation and tactics of the single wing; which, I hope, came as no surprise to anyone here. I doubt that there is anything about football that BB hasn't seen, and studied, at some point in his past. That's one reason why I was so surprised, during that Miami game, that he was unable to make adjustments, even during the half-time break, to defense it more effectively. Are our current group of defensive starters too dumb to make adjustments without a full week of practice to do so? I mean, we showed clearly in the second Miami game that the "Wildcat" was not going to beat us again. Why couldn't BB get his team to successfully adjust during the first game?
         
        ***** It's also worth noting that most of the decent defensive teams are now prepared for that formation, and have taken away most of it's effectiveness. However, it's equally clear that it has a value that shouldn't be abandoned. Having a few single wing plays in the game plan gives opponents one more thing to prepare for in every game; and, if they fail to do so, it can certainly spring some big plays in key situations. I used to suggest the same thing about the occasional use of the wishbone. The problem with the wishbone is that it requires a QB with some special skills as a RB in order to be effective. But I still think that it, like the single wing, could be run by a team that has a RB who can handle the ball well on a snap, and make good "keep or give" decisions just after the snap. Neither of those formations, the single wing, or the wishbone, could succeed as a primary formation in the NFL today. The defenders simply have too much speed and experience to allow consistent success with them. But both, IMO, have value as "special plays" for use as surprises at few points during a game. And, of course, they are fun to watch!
         
        ***** Our guy to run those formations would obviously be Kevin Faulk. Wouldn't he be fun to watch as a wishbone QB, with Evans at FB, and Morris and Jordan (or Bee Gee) as the HBs?
         
        (Yeah, I've decided to go with "Bee Gee" for BenJarvus Green-Ellis from now on. Simple, fun, and a nostalgic reminder of the days when singing groups actually had to SING! ... I couldn't call him "Eagles"; because it doesn't make sense, and the name is taken! ... Mamas and Papas? Supremes? Temptations? ... Nah. I'll stick with "Bee Gee"!)
         
         

        George

         

         
         


        From: patriotzip@yahoogroups.com [mailto:patriotzip@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rich Carreiro
        Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2008 11:19 AM
        To: patriotzip@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [patriotzip] Awesome article about the single-wing/wildcat

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