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Re: [partman] Re: XP reboot overwrites/alters (pm v2.43) boot manager partion table??

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  • Phil Seakins
    I always use RPM for configuration and diagnostics. However, if you are working with large partition numbers and you need a Boot Manager it is well worth
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 1, 2009
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      I always use RPM for configuration and diagnostics. However, if you
      are working with large partition numbers and you need a Boot Manager
      it is well worth taking a look at BootItNG. It's not free but it is
      relatively inexpensive and it solves all your problems including
      partition resizing and sliding and copying. The website has some
      excellent video demonstrations. Well worth taking a look at. I do not
      regret my purchase decision.

      On 12/1/09, mdmill9999 <mdmill9999@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > thanks for your responce (i solved this problem by placing the boot manager
      > at the end of the HD...yeah!)
      >
      > But The XOSL program only uses the 4 partitions listed in the MBR table at
      > any one time; so you have to open RPM to change this configuration for any
      > OS not in this list of four [and back and forth it goes]. This is not
      > acceptable to me. That is the strength of having the boot manager and the
      > RPM [internal] partition table linked.
      > I can boot to any of my 9 different and duplicate OS's with one touch.
      > Plus, 3 other data partitions are always in the MBR, and available to the
      > OS's.....at least that is what i am attempting to do[there are problems
      > working above the 137 GB limit].
      >
      > thanks again
      >
      > --- In partman@yahoogroups.com, "britonusa" <yahoo_britonusa@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > As always, Antoine's answer contains great advice which you should
      > follow.
      > >
      > > For me - and I understand many other RPM users - RPM is a great partition
      > management/manipulation tool and I use it all the time but I don't use it to
      > boot. For boot management, I use XOSL. The combination of the two is great.
      > XOSL allows you rather more flexibility in terms of booting, hiding etc and
      > can be restored when some arrogant Windows program decides to do away with
      > it so it is really easy to get is set up and re-set up. Meanwhile, RPM is
      > there for your partition management. XOSL even comes with an option to
      > include RPM, but I would be sure you are using the best version so check
      > before using the XOSL packaged RPM. XOSL also provides a "prettier" end
      > result which is useful if you are setting up the boot options on someone
      > else's computer (wife, kids etc etc) and you can put in a password so they
      > can't change things.
      > >
      > > For me, keeping partition management and boot management separate helps
      > to avoid me getting cornfuzzled. I mean when you are up to your neck in
      > alligators, it's kinda hard sometimes to remember you came here to drain the
      > swamp, right?
      > >
      >
      >
      >
    • britonusa
      ... OK, that makes sense. I used to do something similar although not as many as 9 OS/duplicates. It became hard work so I sought a different solution which
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 1, 2009
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        --- In partman@yahoogroups.com, "mdmill9999" <mdmill9999@...> wrote:
        > But The XOSL program only uses the 4 partitions listed in the MBR table at any one time; so you have to open RPM to change this configuration for any OS not in this list of four [and back and forth it goes]. This is not acceptable to me. That is the strength of having the boot manager and the RPM [internal] partition table linked.
        > I can boot to any of my 9 different and duplicate OS's with one touch.
        > Plus, 3 other data partitions are always in the MBR, and available to the OS's.....at least that is what i am attempting to do[there are problems working above the 137 GB limit].

        OK, that makes sense. I used to do something similar although not as many as 9 OS/duplicates. It became hard work so I sought a different solution which allowed XOSL to handle the boot management for the main Windows OS partitions and pass the torch to a Linux boot manager for the Linux partitions - that also helped with auto-updating of kernels in Linux. Meanwhile, many of the OSes are able to "see" the other partitions once booted.

        But I see that for what you want to do, you have to make RPM's boot manager do it.
      • mdmill9999
        I will check out BootitNG, thanks.
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 1, 2009
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          I will check out BootitNG, thanks.

          --- In partman@yahoogroups.com, Phil Seakins <seakinsp@...> wrote:
          >
          > I always use RPM for configuration and diagnostics. However, if you
          > are working with large partition numbers and you need a Boot Manager
          > it is well worth taking a look at BootItNG. It's not free but it is
          > relatively inexpensive and it solves all your problems including
          > partition resizing and sliding and copying. The website has some
          > excellent video demonstrations. Well worth taking a look at. I do not
          > regret my purchase decision.
          >
          > On 12/1/09, mdmill9999 <mdmill9999@...> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > thanks for your responce (i solved this problem by placing the boot manager
          > > at the end of the HD...yeah!)
          > >
          > > But The XOSL program only uses the 4 partitions listed in the MBR table at
          > > any one time; so you have to open RPM to change this configuration for any
          > > OS not in this list of four [and back and forth it goes]. This is not
          > > acceptable to me. That is the strength of having the boot manager and the
          > > RPM [internal] partition table linked.
          > > I can boot to any of my 9 different and duplicate OS's with one touch.
          > > Plus, 3 other data partitions are always in the MBR, and available to the
          > > OS's.....at least that is what i am attempting to do[there are problems
          > > working above the 137 GB limit].
          > >
          > > thanks again
          > >
          > > --- In partman@yahoogroups.com, "britonusa" <yahoo_britonusa@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > As always, Antoine's answer contains great advice which you should
          > > follow.
          > > >
          > > > For me - and I understand many other RPM users - RPM is a great partition
          > > management/manipulation tool and I use it all the time but I don't use it to
          > > boot. For boot management, I use XOSL. The combination of the two is great.
          > > XOSL allows you rather more flexibility in terms of booting, hiding etc and
          > > can be restored when some arrogant Windows program decides to do away with
          > > it so it is really easy to get is set up and re-set up. Meanwhile, RPM is
          > > there for your partition management. XOSL even comes with an option to
          > > include RPM, but I would be sure you are using the best version so check
          > > before using the XOSL packaged RPM. XOSL also provides a "prettier" end
          > > result which is useful if you are setting up the boot options on someone
          > > else's computer (wife, kids etc etc) and you can put in a password so they
          > > can't change things.
          > > >
          > > > For me, keeping partition management and boot management separate helps
          > > to avoid me getting cornfuzzled. I mean when you are up to your neck in
          > > alligators, it's kinda hard sometimes to remember you came here to drain the
          > > swamp, right?
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
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