Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Raw disk and Partam...what Can I do?

Expand Messages
  • garry
    in Norton Ghost you can recover partitions it will scan your disk and recover lost partitions ... go ... partition ... files ... I ... best.
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 20, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      in Norton Ghost you can recover partitions it will scan your disk
      and recover lost partitions

      --- In partman@yahoogroups.com, "piziarl" <piziarl@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi there,
      > I have a problem and I can't goback what I have done for it, but I
      go
      > to try.
      > I have 3 HD and these partitions
      > :
      > -D: NTFS \Device\Harddisk0\Partition1 (before problems)
      > -E: NTFS \Device\Harddisk1\Partition2 (partition with Xp)
      > -C: NTFS \Device\Harddisk1\Partition1
      > -H: Linux \Device\Harddisk2\Partition1
      > -I: Linux \Device\Harddisk2\Partition2
      > -J: Linux \Device\Harddisk2\Partition3
      > -K: Linux \Device\Harddisk2\Partition5
      > -L: Linux \Device\Harddisk2\Partition6
      > -M: Linux \Device\Harddisk2\Partition7
      > -F: FAT32 \Device\Harddisk2\Partition4
      > As is shown here:
      > http://img211.imageshack.us/my.php?image=immagine0ri5.jpg
      >
      > Problems have started because I had my system files in a different
      > partition instead that in wich I have Xp.
      > Maybe this happened because I installed a previous Xp on D:
      partition
      > and then another in E: Maybe Windows has choosen by itself how to
      > partition the disk. (really I don't remember)
      > I have deleted the first installation and then, some weeks later, I
      > wished to make order on my disks and I have tried to move system
      files
      > where there was the correct installation.
      > Later on I could not access to windows.
      > Here comes Partman!! I have looked inside disks and I have observed
      > that disk with E: has not a boot sector, becasue is a extended
      > partition and windows MUST boot from a primary partition (I didn't
      > know :[ ). Boot Sector was found in D:\ and I let it as it was, but
      I
      > changed the boot sector in C: hoping that moving the here my system
      > could boot up, but also this way was unable to solve the problem.
      > Now...If I try to use Bart-Pe I found c: as a raw disk and inside
      > there are many Gb of data I can't lose.
      > There is a way to solve this matter???
      > Please let me know
      > I am going to be mad If I can't recovery all my data and I apologize
      > if my english is not so good as I wish to explain my self with my
      best.
      >
      > Thank
      >
      > stho
      > I have tried to make that
      >
    • Antoine Leca
      Ciao, First, since your xp %RootDrive% is not on C:, please take double precautions with partionning tools like RPM: they will erase the signatures engraved in
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 21, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Ciao,

        First, since your xp %RootDrive% is not on C:, please take double
        precautions with partionning tools like RPM: they will erase the
        signatures engraved in the MBR records when you save them, thus forcing
        xp to renumber all the disks at next boot, loosing all assignments it
        can have, which is then likely to make registry paths to become wrong,
        then leading directly to the situation described in
        http://support.microsoft.com/kb/249321/it, with possible solutions in
        http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223188/it.
        A preventive solution is to use another tool (MbrFix,
        http://www.sysint.no/Nedlasting/MbrFix.htm, or MBRtools,
        http://www.diydatarecovery.nl/mbrtool.htm, are handy) to manage
        specifically the NT signature.

        Also, it is quite possible (using RPM for example) to switch a partition
        between logical and primary, but this is not for the faint of heart, you
        really should understand what you are doing.


        piziarl wrote:
        > -D: NTFS \Device\Harddisk0\Partition1 (before problems)
        > -E: NTFS \Device\Harddisk1\Partition2 (partition with Xp)
        > As is shown here:
        > http://img211.imageshack.us/my.php?image=immagine0ri5.jpg

        ...

        > Later on I could not access to windows. Here comes Partman!!
        > I have looked inside disks and I have observed that disk with
        > E: has not a boot sector,

        E: (\Device\Harddisk1, really) does not need any master boot record, at
        least until there is a \Device\Harddisk0 in place.

        The booting path is as follow: POST in BIOS, enumerate disks, read MBR
        from HD0 sect 0, jump to it, this one selects D: as it is active, load
        sector 0 of this volume, jump to it, this one loads the rest of $Boot
        (8K file embedded at the beginning of the NTFS volume), seeks after
        NTLDR on the D: volume, loads it, jump to it, this one loads BOOT.INI
        and NTDETECT.COM (always form D:), then !!! will search after the
        Windows kernel on whatever volume you saved it (using the ARC path shown
        in BOOT.INI).

        You can read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Booting in English, and
        compare with http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boot (and perhaps you can
        enhance the latter, while you are there ;-).)


        > I changed the boot sector in C:

        C: is not marked as "attivo" (active or startable), so this is strictly
        no effect! Even if you do, you'll have to force HD1 to be the boot
        device (either changing the physical disk attachments, or using BIOS
        options.)


        Your situation is not desesperate at all, there are a number of
        solutions to backup your datas (BTW, saving the WINDOWS tree from
        outside, BartPE or Linux, might prove useful later; also using imaging
        tools like Ghost permits "try and fail and repeat" tactics) and restore
        your xp setup. You really need to understand step by step what's
        happening, then correct the piece of the puzzle which is missing or
        badly configured. Then booting xp, then doing backups!


        Bonne chance,


        Antoine
      • britonusa
        ... wrong, Just a note to remind you that within Windows (of all species since 95 I think, but certainly all supported varieties), you can assign drive letters
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 2, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In partman@yahoogroups.com, "Antoine Leca" <aleca@...> wrote:
          > ..... thus forcing
          > xp to renumber all the disks at next boot, loosing all assignments it
          > can have, which is then likely to make registry paths to become
          wrong,

          Just a note to remind you that within Windows (of all species since 95
          I think, but certainly all supported varieties), you can assign drive
          letters as you like. So if after an RPM session, the assignments don't
          fit your previous Windows setup, it is a fairly easy matter to put
          them back.

          From Windows XP onwards, if your OS partition is NTFS (and you only
          need one NTFS partition to do this), any other partition can be
          mounted to an empty directory (or folder if you prefer that name).
          Which is, of course, how you deal with the "there are only 26 letters
          in the Roman alphabet but I have a ridiculous number of drives without
          letters" syndrome. If you run a network (home or otherwise), this
          means that only you need to know what the partitions consist of or
          which letters apply - the other users (wife, lover, fellow student,
          assorted idiots who use computers without any idea how they work lol)
          can have some nice easy directory/folder name which helps them know
          what they should look for in there.

          So the really important point to stress here is that you should ensure
          that any drive letter assignments which are needed at startup are not
          changed in the RPM session without taking some further action before
          allowing the boot.

          Hope that relaxes things a little.
        • Antoine Leca
          ... Not exactly. Only the NT kernel (3.x, 4.0, 5.0 aka 2000, 5.1 aka xp etc.) knows how to do this kind of magic. How it achieves did change between 3/4 (which
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 5, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            > --- In partman@yahoogroups.com, "Antoine Leca" <aleca@...> wrote:
            > > ..... thus forcing xp to renumber all the disks at next boot,
            > > loosing all assignments it can have, which is then likely
            > > to make registry paths to become wrong,
            >
            > Just a note to remind you that within Windows (of all species
            > since 95

            Not exactly. Only the NT kernel (3.x, 4.0, 5.0 aka 2000, 5.1 aka xp
            etc.) knows how to do this kind of magic. How it achieves did change
            between 3/4 (which uses the DISK opaque structure, stored in
            HKLM\SYSTEM) and 5.x which uses the more open MountedDevices key (also
            in HKLM\SYSTEM).
            Windows 95/98/Me does not have the equivalent, it strictly relies on DOS
            rules (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/51978) to assign letters to
            volumes driven by INT13 (on the other hand, drives supported by the
            network redirector, like CDROM, can be assigned arbiratrory letters,
            include under DOS).


            > I think, but certainly all supported varieties), you can assign drive
            > letters as you like. So if after an RPM session, the
            > assignments don't fit your previous Windows setup, it is a fairly
            > easy matter to put them back.

            I know it is possible (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307844), but I
            would not qualify it as very easy when it involves the system drive (see
            kb223188, as I indicated), or if the to-be-renamed drive is involved at
            some point in a critical boot process (here, I think about anti-virus or
            simialr paranoical programs.)


            > From Windows XP onwards, if your OS partition is NTFS (and you only
            > need one NTFS partition to do this), any other partition can be
            > mounted to an empty directory (or folder if you prefer that name).

            Works with 2000 too (the features is called reparse points).
            However, the system drive is required to be mounted as a letter (it is a
            catch 22 problem else).

            > If you run a network (home or otherwise), this
            > means that only you need to know what the partitions consist of or
            > which letters apply - the other users (wife, lover, fellow student,
            > assorted idiots who use computers without any idea how they work lol)
            > can have some nice easy directory/folder name which helps them know
            > what they should look for in there.

            Yes :-). By the way, I run some exotic combinations here, and I have
            learn the hard way that you better have the C: drive assigned (perhaps
            to a network share); because there are far too much programs and kernel
            drivers out there which assumes there is a default C: disk... and when
            they insist to try to read or write it, the net result is an "I/O
            timeout", with you gloomily starring at the system doing nothing but
            wait for the innexistent device 8-(


            > So the really important point to stress here is that you should ensure

            > that any drive letter assignments which are needed at startup are not
            > changed in the RPM session without taking some further action before
            > allowing the boot.

            Yes. Furthermore, as you and I stressed above, what really matters is
            the assignment of the system drive (the one which hosts WINDOWS/WINNT
            directory.)
            Now, under NT 5.x (2000 and up) and 6, this assignment is drived by the
            content of the HKLM\SYSTEM\MountedDevices key *of the current Windows*
            (which means that if you have several installations, all should be
            updated). The best way to figure it is to have a look of the content:
            there are a bunch of \??\Volume{some-guid} values which describes all
            the volumes once known to the system, and a more reduced number of
            \DosDevices\x: values which remembers the assignments to letters. In
            both cases, for MBR harddisks, the actual content is a 12-byte structure
            which can be read in two parts: first are the 4-byte signature that one
            can find in the MBR at offset 0x1B8, then is the 64-bit offset to the
            actual volume (in bytes, divide by 512 to get the sector number that can
            be matched with RPM output.)

            What is happening under the hood is that RPM resets the signature when
            you edit the IPL in the MBR. As a result, next time xp/200x mounts the
            drive, it reassigns a new signature... and discards all the previous
            recorded assignments (this is the process I described succinctly in the
            part you quoted.)
            If this does not involves the system drive (because it is in another
            hard disk), or if the system drive is renumbered to the same one as
            before (this happens frequently, for example because the system drive is
            the active partition of the first hard disk, so it is always been given
            the C: letter and life is good), there is no real problem, as you
            observed correctly.

            Now, and I believe it was what happended to the original poster, if the
            process involved the system drive and changes its letter, it certainly
            make impossible for Windows to boot (again, see
            http://support.microsoft.com/kb/249321/.)


            To conclude and because it can interest you, with Vista the use of the
            signature for the system drive seems to occur even earlier in the
            process (when the system interprets the BCD), so it is even more
            critical to keep it (and to restore it after RPM erases it), if not you
            will not be able to boot at all
            (http://www.multibooters.co.uk/mbr.html.)


            Hope it helps,

            Antoine
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.