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Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil

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  • Kevin Budd
    ... One difference with the pan flute is that since you are blowing through many tubes, water does not build up in the same way as with a recorder, for
    Message 1 of 22 , Sep 1 2:18 PM
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      Ken Webster wrote:

      > The bore surface seems to have a lot to do with tonal quality so you
      > don't
      > want water beading in there as you then have a water bead surface
      > instead
      > of a wood grain surface so the flute would not sound like a wood flute
      > anymore and that is the whole point of a wood flute after all.

      One difference with the pan flute is that since you are blowing through many
      tubes, water does not build up in the same way as with a recorder, for
      example. As well, it can be simply demonstrated that a closed tube, as in the
      pan flute, functions like a venturi. We blow in such a way that the inner air
      is set vibrating. I am not sure how much of our moist breath actually goes in
      compared to a recorder, for example. It may be that most of the breath
      moisture is drawn over the edge. I assume such moisture buildup is
      condensation...and so it should happen more at low temperatures and very
      little at high temperatures.

      I have never in my life swabbed out a pan flute tube to remove moisture. But I
      also leave my pan flutes out after playing, so perhaps they simply dry naturally.

      p.s. last night I was interviewed on a local Romanian radio show. During one
      advertisement, they mentioned "propolis pentru sarmale"...or "propolis for
      cabbage rolls". I am trying to find out what that was all about. Maybe
      Romanians use propolis to glue cabbage rolls together.

      Kevin
    • Ken Webster
      Hi All On another flute making list, it seemed to me the consensus was that one advantage of wood over non porous materials like metal or plastic is that it
      Message 2 of 22 , Sep 1 4:29 PM
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        Hi All

        On another flute making list, it seemed to me the consensus was that one
        advantage of wood over non porous materials like metal or plastic is that
        it can absorb moisture and wick away condensation that forms inside the
        bore.

        The bore surface seems to have a lot to do with tonal quality so you don't
        want water beading in there as you then have a water bead surface instead
        of a wood grain surface so the flute would not sound like a wood flute
        anymore and that is the whole point of a wood flute after all.

        Transferring this argument to pan flutes, I would go for as natural a finish
        as possible. By all means use oil as it won't totally prevent moisture
        getting into the bamboo but will help preserve it and prevent splitting
        but I personally would avoid using sealers or varnish on the inside.

        The outside is another mater as moisture tends to travel best along the
        grain
        and evaporate from the end grain, not so much through the sides. So if you
        want to use lacquer or varnish on the outside only, it seems very important
        to
        leave the end grain unsealed to allow the bamboo to dry out between playing.

        Anyway it seemed to me the main points of argument on that list would
        indicate
        a preservative treatment (oil or other) that allows wood/bamboo to both
        absorb
        and release moisture.


        Regards,
        Ken




        -----Original Message-----
        From: Kevin Budd [mailto:kbudd@...]
        Sent: Friday, 30 August 2002 8:14 PM
        To: panflute-world@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil


        Regarding propolis or almond oil,


        I really think that if there were one clear and obvious choice, everyone
        would
        use it. Or, if one were very bad, no one would use it. This tells me that in
        fact, there are several good choices, or that it really does not matter.

        Preda pan flutes are very good. So propolis must work. Joeri Murk pan flutes
        are very good too, and he was using oil, and is now using silicone oil, I
        believe. The new idea is that almond oil may dissolve the natural oils in
        the
        bamboo.

        There have been cases where a panflute could not dry thoroughly and
        developed
        a black mildew under the varnish. I will not say who the maker is, (not me!)
        but I know of several cases. This might be an argument for waterproofing the
        inside and letting the outside breathe in some way.

        It is often the player, not the maker who may have certain preferences.
        Cornel
        Pana, for example, prefers a totally natural bamboo tube, unfinished on the
        outside. However, these are very small differences, and may not even be
        "scientific". I have heard that some brass instrument players have coated
        their trumpets etc. with gold, to give a warm softer edge to the sound.
        However, on a brass instrument the skin is vibrating and the pan flute sound
        is produced differently.

        I made a brass pan flute, which had a very "brassy" sound to it, but then I
        glued bamboo edges on both sides of the tubes, and lo, it has a regular
        bamboo
        sound! So the edges are more important than the inner walls or material.

        Kevin






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      • panflutejedi
        ... I assume such moisture buildup is condensation...and so it should happen more at low temperatures and very little at high temperatures. Kevin Hello Kevin,
        Message 3 of 22 , Sep 1 9:10 PM
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          --- In panflute-world@y..., Kevin Budd <kbudd@i...> wrote:

          I assume such moisture buildup is condensation...and so it should
          happen more at low temperatures and very little at high temperatures.

          Kevin


          Hello Kevin,

          I think you have the truth of it. When I perform outdoors, I never
          have a problem with breath condensation in my Panflute's tubes during
          warmer seasons, but condensation certainly occurs during my Christmas
          and First Night performances. I don't let this worry me, though,
          since I build my Panflutes to withstand such environmental extremes.
          I simply flip the instrument upside-down, let the moisture drain out,
          and "Pan on", as Walti would say!

          Douglas aka "Panflute Jedi"
          http://www.panflutejedi.com
        • Ken Webster
          Yes Kevin I certainly do agree that condensation in pan flutes is a much more minor issue than for open tube flutes. Any moisture entering the pan flute tubes
          Message 4 of 22 , Sep 1 10:00 PM
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            Yes Kevin I certainly do agree that condensation in pan
            flutes is a much more minor issue than for open tube flutes.

            Any moisture entering the pan flute tubes would have to be
            by way of turbulence I would think. I do entertain the
            possibility there may be some circulation flow patterns generated.
            If we look at this aerodynamically, there would have to be a high
            pressure region just below the edge of the far wall and a low
            opposite it on the near side (venturi effect). This must create a
            circulation in the top of the pipe. Kind of like a ball bearing
            just below the air reed. It would be normal to assume at least
            some mixing between the breath flow and the circulation.

            The circulation may extend further into the pipe with changes in
            blowing angle and may generate weaker and weaker circulations
            further down, each exchanging a little moisture. Can't see much
            moisture finding its way very far down the tubes, though a little must.

            I can observe at least some condensation on plastic pan pipes.

            I was attempting to relate some principles which I think may have
            some bearing on the topic of finishes. Just how much consideration
            should be given them, that certainly is debatable.

            My suggestions where to err on the side of allowing any moisture to
            dry out easily, especially to avoid completely sealing the end grain.
            I did lacquer the inside of a set of pipes once and instead of the usual
            6 hour drying time, I think it took something like a week.
            Hmm, don't think I'll do it again.


            Regards,
            Ken




            -----Original Message-----
            From: Kevin Budd [mailto:kbudd@...]
            Sent: Monday, 2 September 2002 7:18 AM
            To: panflute-world@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil


            Ken Webster wrote:

            > The bore surface seems to have a lot to do with tonal quality so you
            > don't
            > want water beading in there as you then have a water bead surface
            > instead
            > of a wood grain surface so the flute would not sound like a wood flute
            > anymore and that is the whole point of a wood flute after all.

            One difference with the pan flute is that since you are blowing through many
            tubes, water does not build up in the same way as with a recorder, for
            example. As well, it can be simply demonstrated that a closed tube, as in
            the
            pan flute, functions like a venturi. We blow in such a way that the inner
            air
            is set vibrating. I am not sure how much of our moist breath actually goes
            in
            compared to a recorder, for example. It may be that most of the breath
            moisture is drawn over the edge. I assume such moisture buildup is
            condensation...and so it should happen more at low temperatures and very
            little at high temperatures.

            I have never in my life swabbed out a pan flute tube to remove moisture. But
            I
            also leave my pan flutes out after playing, so perhaps they simply dry
            naturally.

            p.s. last night I was interviewed on a local Romanian radio show. During one
            advertisement, they mentioned "propolis pentru sarmale"...or "propolis for
            cabbage rolls". I am trying to find out what that was all about. Maybe
            Romanians use propolis to glue cabbage rolls together.

            Kevin




            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



            ***************************************************************
            This message is intended for the addressee named and
            may contain confidential information. If you are not the
            intended recipient, please delete it and notify the sender.
            Views expressed in this message are those of the
            individual sender, and are not necessarily the views of the
            Department of Information Technology & Management.

            This email message has been swept by MIMEsweeper
            for the presence of computer viruses.
            ***************************************************************
          • Mark
            Hi Alan, I copied and pasted a page from a local website explaining “Propolis” please read below it is quite informative. Regards Mark What is Propolis?
            Message 5 of 22 , Sep 1 10:31 PM
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              Hi Alan,  

               

              I copied and pasted a page from a local website explaining “Propolis”  please read below it is quite informative.   

               

              Regards Mark  

               

               

              What is Propolis?

              Propolis is manufactured by bees from the sap of trees and flower blossoms. Propolis protects the beehive from penetration of harmful insects and aids in insulating the beehive, and maintaining a sterile environment.

              Many studies conducted in Israel and abroad have proven propolis' effectiveness in fighting viruses, bacteria and fungi, and as an anti-inflammatory agent. Propolis is known as Nature's Antibiotic, capable of fighting pathogenic (disease causing) bacteria, as opposed to conventional antibiotics which destroy all the body's natural flora. In addition, bacteria do not become resistant because many natural factors (the sap source, climate and geagraphical region) all indiscernably yet significantly continually alter the natural composition.

              Propolis strengthens the body's resistance to winter's ailments: infections, flu and colds. Propolis can be used externally to heal cuts, torn tissues and burns (up to second degree) and for surgical scars. Propolis has been found to be effective in the treatment of gum and mouth infections.

              General Info

              Propolis has been used for centuries as a folk remedy and has only in recent years been "re-discovered" by science resulting in comprehensive research regarding the active ingredients of propolis and its antibacterial properties.

              Recently conducted research in Oxford university in the U.K has proven the inhibitory action of propolis on the growth of certain strains of bacteria. Certain formulations of propolis has shown a dramatic improvement in the treatment of a variety of ailments; from chronic gum infections, stomach ulcers and wound infections to severe colds and flu and related respiratory infections. Propolis is widely used as preventive and is extremely effective when used in the correct formulation to boost the immune system.

              From experience gained in South Africa and Israel, propolis is effective in the treatment of children with "Creche Syndrome"(click) and recurrent Upper and lower respiratory infections. Children treated with this formulation (Propolis Kid) as preventive have shown better resistance to respiratory infections which reduces absenteeism from schools and nursery schools

              . From other recent research (Prof.A.Beckett (UK)) it was proved that propolis in tablet form significantly improves clinical symptoms of stomach ulcers due its antibacterial action (specifically with new research connecting 40% of stomach ulcers cases to bacterial infection). Propolis also acts promptly and effectively to eliminate heartburn when taken in a liquid form. Propolis has been noted for quite a while as one of the most effective remedies for the Herpes virus, specifically the Simplex type and a combination of locally applied cream containing propolis with internal treatment of propolis extract resulting in prompt relief for the patient. (The above information should not be used be seen as a claim for any remedial properties, it is entirely based on experience of propolis users, therefore it is advisable to consult your physician or homeopath regarding treatment).

               

               



              > Regarding propolis or almond oil,
              >
              > There have been cases where a panflute could not dry thoroughly and
              developed
              > a black mildew under the varnish. I will not say who the maker is,
              (not
              me!)
              > but I know of several cases. This might be an argument for
              waterproofing
              the
              > inside and letting the outside breathe in some way.

              I had a problem with mildew on the inside of some of the tubes of my Preda
              panflute.  However, that was my fault , I think, as when on holiday a couple
              of years ago and travelling around, after playing I immediately wrapped up
              the panpipes for protection and they had not had the opportunity to dry out.
              However, as I said in this group a few months back, the problem was solved
              by using the disinfecting fluid "Milton" which is used for sterilising water
              and babies bottles.

              Could Kevin please say a little more on the subject of propolis.  Is it an
              oil?  Where does it come from, and where would one be likely to obtain it?



              Alan
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              href="http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/">http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >



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            • Alan E. Bell
              ... From: David Donaldson To: panflute-world@yahoogroups.com Sent: 31 August 2002 01:32 Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil Here in the
              Message 6 of 22 , Sep 2 4:05 AM
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                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: 31 August 2002 01:32
                Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil

                Here in the Southern USA, no one that I have spoken with has heard of "Milton", except for it being a person's name. Just what is the composition of this disinfectant, and where is it obtained?

                David D

                 

                Dear David,

                I have discovered that at the moment we have no Milton in the house so I can't answer your question just now.  However my wife assures me that she will go now and get a replacement as we use the product all the time.  My wife tells me that it is really a bleach which is used as well to sterilise a variety of things.  When we have  a replacement bottle I will write again with more info. It certainly gets rid of the mildew in the panflute.

                 

                Alan

                  "Alan E. Bell" wrote:


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Kevin Budd <kbudd@...>
                To: <panflute-world@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: 30 August 2002 11:14
                Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil


                > Regarding propolis or almond oil,
                >
                > There have been cases where a panflute could not dry thoroughly and
                developed
                > a black mildew under the varnish. I will not say who the maker is, (not
                me!)
                > but I know of several cases. This might be an argument for waterproofing
                the
                > inside and letting the outside breathe in some way.

                I had a problem with mildew on the inside of some of the tubes of my Preda
                panflute.  However, that was my fault , I think, as when on holiday a couple
                of years ago and travelling around, after playing I immediately wrapped up
                the panpipes for protection and they had not had the opportunity to dry out.
                However, as I said in this group a few months back, the problem was solved
                by using the disinfecting fluid "Milton" which is used for sterilising water
                and babies bottles.

                Could Kevin please say a little more on the subject of propolis.  Is it an
                oil?  Where does it come from, and where would one be likely to obtain it?



                Alan
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >
                >



                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



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              • Alan E. Bell
                ... From: Mark To: panflute-world@yahoogroups.com Sent: 02 September 2002 06:31 Subject: RE: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil Hi Alan, I copied and
                Message 7 of 22 , Sep 2 4:20 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Mark
                  Sent: 02 September 2002 06:31
                  Subject: RE: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil

                  Hi Alan,  

                   

                  I copied and pasted a page from a local website explaining “Propolis”  please read below it is quite informative.   

                   

                  Regards Mark  

                   

                   

                  Dear Mark,

                   

                  Many thanks for that very informative E mail.  After reading the contents, I think that, now that I have the mildew problem cured with the use of "Milton",I should start to use the propolis.

                   

                  Thanks again,

                   

                   

                  Alan

                   

                   

                  What is Propolis?

                  Propolis is manufactured by bees from the sap of trees and flower blossoms. Propolis protects the beehive from penetration of harmful insects and aids in insulating the beehive, and maintaining a sterile environment.

                  Many studies conducted in Israel and abroad have proven propolis' effectiveness in fighting viruses, bacteria and fungi, and as an anti-inflammatory agent. Propolis is known as Nature's Antibiotic, capable of fighting pathogenic (disease causing) bacteria, as opposed to conventional antibiotics which destroy all the body's natural flora. In addition, bacteria do not become resistant because many natural factors (the sap source, climate and geagraphical region) all indiscernably yet significantly continually alter the natural composition.

                  Propolis strengthens the body's resistance to winter's ailments: infections, flu and colds. Propolis can be used externally to heal cuts, torn tissues and burns (up to second degree) and for surgical scars. Propolis has been found to be effective in the treatment of gum and mouth infections.

                  General Info

                  Propolis has been used for centuries as a folk remedy and has only in recent years been "re-discovered" by science resulting in comprehensive research regarding the active ingredients of propolis and its antibacterial properties.

                  Recently conducted research in Oxford university in the U.K has proven the inhibitory action of propolis on the growth of certain strains of bacteria. Certain formulations of propolis has shown a dramatic improvement in the treatment of a variety of ailments; from chronic gum infections, stomach ulcers and wound infections to severe colds and flu and related respiratory infections. Propolis is widely used as preventive and is extremely effective when used in the correct formulation to boost the immune system.

                  From experience gained in South Africa and Israel, propolis is effective in the treatment of children with "Creche Syndrome"(click) and recurrent Upper and lower respiratory infections. Children treated with this formulation (Propolis Kid) as preventive have shown better resistance to respiratory infections which reduces absenteeism from schools and nursery schools

                  . From other recent research (Prof.A.Beckett (UK)) it was proved that propolis in tablet form significantly improves clinical symptoms of stomach ulcers due its antibacterial action (specifically with new research connecting 40% of stomach ulcers cases to bacterial infection). Propolis also acts promptly and effectively to eliminate heartburn when taken in a liquid form. Propolis has been noted for quite a while as one of the most effective remedies for the Herpes virus, specifically the Simplex type and a combination of locally applied cream containing propolis with internal treatment of propolis extract resulting in prompt relief for the patient. (The above information should not be used be seen as a claim for any remedial properties, it is entirely based on experience of propolis users, therefore it is advisable to consult your physician or homeopath regarding treatment).

                   

                   



                  > Regarding propolis or almond oil,
                  >
                  > There have been cases where a panflute could not dry thoroughly and
                  developed
                  > a black mildew under the varnish. I will not say who the maker is, (not
                  me!)
                  > but I know of several cases. This might be an argument for waterproofing
                  the
                  > inside and letting the outside breathe in some way.

                  I had a problem with mildew on the inside of some of the tubes of my Preda
                  panflute.  However, that was my fault , I think, as when on holiday a couple
                  of years ago and travelling around, after playing I immediately wrapped up
                  the panpipes for protection and they had not had the opportunity to dry out.
                  However, as I said in this group a few months back, the problem was solved
                  by using the disinfecting fluid "Milton" which is used for sterilising water
                  and babies bottles.

                  Could Kevin please say a little more on the subject of propolis.  Is it an
                  oil?  Where does it come from, and where would one be likely to obtain it?



                  Alan
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




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                • Mark
                  Hi David, I am pretty sure that any baby sterilizing product can be used, provided that it is fragrance and color free, first read the instructions on the
                  Message 8 of 22 , Sep 2 4:22 AM
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                    Hi David,

                     

                    I am pretty sure that any baby sterilizing product can be used, provided that it is fragrance and color free, first read the instructions on the bottle, but ultimately Milton’s is the best sterilization liquid I know of. It comes in a blue bottle with a white cap and white writing. Enquire at you local baby store or chemist for it or a similar product.

                     

                    Regards Mark

                     

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    From:
                    David Donaldson

                    To: panflute-world@yahoogroups.com

                    Sent: 31 August 2002 01:32

                    Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil

                     

                    Here in the Southern USA, no one that I have spoken with has heard of "Milton", except for it being a person's name. Just what is the composition of this disinfectant, and where is it obtained?

                    David D

                     

                    Dear David,

                    I have discovered that at the moment we have no Milton in the house so I can't answer your question just now.  However my wife assures me that she will go now and get a replacement as we use the product all the time.  My wife tells me that it is really a bleach which is used as well to sterilise a variety of things.  When we have  a replacement bottle I will write again with more info. It certainly gets rid of the mildew in the panflute.

                     

                    Alan

                      "Alan E. Bell" wrote:


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Kevin Budd <kbudd@...>
                    To: <panflute-world@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: 30 August 2002 11:14
                    Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil


                    > Regarding propolis or almond oil,
                    >
                    > There have been cases where a panflute could not dry thoroughly and
                    developed
                    > a black mildew under the varnish. I will not say who the maker is, (not
                    me!)
                    > but I know of several cases. This might be an argument for waterproofing
                    the
                    > inside and letting the outside breathe in some way.

                    I had a problem with mildew on the inside of some of the tubes of my Preda
                    panflute.  However, that was my fault , I think, as when on holiday a couple
                    of years ago and travelling around, after playing I immediately wrapped up
                    the panpipes for protection and they had not had the opportunity to dry out.
                    However, as I said in this group a few months back, the problem was solved
                    by using the disinfecting fluid "Milton" which is used for sterilising water
                    and babies bottles.

                    Could Kevin please say a little more on the subject of propolis.  Is it an
                    oil?  Where does it come from, and where would one be likely to obtain it?



                    Alan
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

                     


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                  • Mark
                    Hi Alan, Only a pleasure, hope it sorts out your predicament. As far as I can ascertain, when using propolis in a weak alcohol solution, a second application
                    Message 9 of 22 , Sep 2 4:38 AM
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                      Hi Alan,  

                       

                      Only a pleasure, hope it sorts out your predicament. As far as I can ascertain, when using propolis in a weak alcohol solution, a second application may be necessary provided the inner walls are clean

                      Regards Mark

                       

                       

                       

                      Dear Mark,

                       

                      Many thanks for that very informative E mail.  After reading the contents, I think that, now that I have the mildew problem cured with the use of "Milton",I should start to use the propolis.

                       

                      Thanks again,

                       

                       

                      Alan

                       

                       

                       

                    • Kevin Budd
                      ... Maybe the company that makes it is called: Paradise Lost Inc. Or maybe not. (for the non-English languagers, and the non-literary, John Milton was a poet
                      Message 10 of 22 , Sep 2 5:54 AM
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                        Form David:

                        > Here in the Southern USA, no one that I have spoken with has heard of "Milton", except for it being a person's name. Just what is the composition of this disinfectant, and where is it obtained?

                        Maybe the company that makes it is called: "Paradise Lost Inc."

                        Or maybe not. (for the non-English languagers, and the non-literary, John
                        Milton was a poet (1608-1674) whose best-known work, perhaps, was, Paradise
                        Lost". I quote him here, "What sweet compulsion doth in music lie."

                        Regarding propolis etc: The use of propolis would therefore also tend to kill
                        any mildew that might form in the tubes.

                        Another interesting coating for the inside of the tubes would be "Rain-Away"
                        a monomer liquid that is applied to a windshield to make the rain bead up and
                        run off. It makes the surface extremely smooth, so the rain drops can only
                        cling to themselves.

                        And about disinfectants, I was once teaching children to play recorders
                        (blockflutes) and one child told me that the previous teacher had used a
                        special liquid to sterilize the recorders. I asked what liquid he had used and
                        the child thought for a long time and then explained carefully: "I believe he
                        used somthing called... 'disinfectant.'" Thank you very much.

                        Kevin
                      • David Donaldson
                        Thanks Alan! I will look foward to hearing from you. David Alan E. Bell wrote: ----- Original Message ----- From: David Donaldson To:
                        Message 11 of 22 , Sep 2 9:11 AM
                        • 0 Attachment

                          Thanks Alan! I will look foward to hearing from you.

                          David

                           "Alan E. Bell" wrote:

                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: 31 August 2002 01:32
                          Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil

                          Here in the Southern USA, no one that I have spoken with has heard of "Milton", except for it being a person's name. Just what is the composition of this disinfectant, and where is it obtained?

                          David D

                          Dear David,

                          I have discovered that at the moment we have no Milton in the house so I can't answer your question just now.  However my wife assures me that she will go now and get a replacement as we use the product all the time.  My wife tells me that it is really a bleach which is used as well to sterilise a variety of things.  When we have  a replacement bottle I will write again with more info. It certainly gets rid of the mildew in the panflute.

                          Alan

                            "Alan E. Bell" wrote:


                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: Kevin Budd <kbudd@...>
                          To: <panflute-world@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: 30 August 2002 11:14
                          Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil


                          > Regarding propolis or almond oil,
                          >
                          > There have been cases where a panflute could not dry thoroughly and
                          developed
                          > a black mildew under the varnish. I will not say who the maker is, (not
                          me!)
                          > but I know of several cases. This might be an argument for waterproofing
                          the
                          > inside and letting the outside breathe in some way.

                          I had a problem with mildew on the inside of some of the tubes of my Preda
                          panflute.  However, that was my fault , I think, as when on holiday a couple
                          of years ago and travelling around, after playing I immediately wrapped up
                          the panpipes for protection and they had not had the opportunity to dry out.
                          However, as I said in this group a few months back, the problem was solved
                          by using the disinfecting fluid "Milton" which is used for sterilising water
                          and babies bottles.

                          Could Kevin please say a little more on the subject of propolis.  Is it an
                          oil?  Where does it come from, and where would one be likely to obtain it?



                          Alan
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                        • David Pighills
                          Could one construct Panflute a Panflute from Cabbage Rolls ? Dave Kevin Budd wrote: p.s. last night I was interviewed on a local Romanian radio show. During
                          Message 12 of 22 , Sep 2 10:37 AM
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                            Could one construct Panflute a Panflute from Cabbage Rolls ?

                            Dave

                             Kevin Budd wrote:


                            p.s. last night I was interviewed on a local Romanian radio show. During one
                            advertisement, they mentioned "propolis pentru sarmale"...or "propolis for
                            cabbage rolls". I am trying to find out what that was all about. Maybe
                            Romanians use propolis to glue cabbage rolls together.

                            Kevin


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                          • Marilyn J. Heed
                            And then dinner afterwards??? Marilyn ... From: David Pighills [mailto:davepighills@yahoo.com] Sent: Monday, September 02, 2002 11:37 AM To:
                            Message 13 of 22 , Sep 2 4:23 PM
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                              And then dinner afterwards???
                               
                              Marilyn
                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: David Pighills [mailto:davepighills@...]
                              Sent: Monday, September 02, 2002 11:37 AM
                              To: panflute-world@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Propolis or Almond oil

                              Could one construct Panflute a Panflute from Cabbage Rolls ?

                              Dave

                               Kevin Budd wrote:


                              p.s. last night I was interviewed on a local Romanian radio show. During one
                              advertisement, they mentioned "propolis pentru sarmale"...or "propolis for
                              cabbage rolls". I am trying to find out what that was all about. Maybe
                              Romanians use propolis to glue cabbage rolls together.

                              Kevin


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