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Re: [panflute-world] Circular breathing

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  • Jean Pleger
    Hello, I am trying to learn it. All I have as explanation is a booklet that came with my didge. But it works. My panflute teacher does it. But please don t ask
    Message 1 of 23 , Sep 1, 2000
      Hello,

      I am trying to learn it. All I have as explanation is a booklet that came
      with my didge. But it works. My panflute teacher does it.

      But please don't ask me how he does. I don't know. But again, IT WORKS.

      Jean Pleger

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Ken Webster" <Ken_Webster@...>
      To: <panflute-world@egroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, September 01, 2000 12:42 AM
      Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Circular breathing
      > Hi All
      >
      > As a youth I learnt to circular brethe on Didg but have never
      > seriously developed the technique beyond a very rubermentry
      > level. I have heard of some who circular brethe on flute which
      > is quite a bit more difficult as Brad says due to lack of back pressure.
      If it can be done on a concert flute, why not a pan
      > flute. The basic technique is not all that difficult but the trick
      > for flute is doing is smoothly and seemlessly.
      >
      > Ken Webster websterk@...
    • Craig Packard
      In response to Brad s note, I can add a little, although I m not a circular breather myself. Circular breathing occurs widely in Eastern European instrumental
      Message 2 of 23 , Sep 1, 2000
        In response to Brad's note, I can add a little, although I'm not a circular breather myself.

        Circular breathing occurs widely in Eastern European instrumental music. Virtually all the zurla/zurna players use it continuously. I've seen a fair number of clarinet players use it, too. The most unusual instance has been (for me) recent--this past weekend, in fact--when I realized that my Bulgarian kaval-playing friend Nikolay Doktorov uses it all the time. Bulgarian kaval, by the way, is a long end-blown wooden flute.

        So, there are at least two quite different techniques in use that I know of. One involves using the cheeks as a reservoir of air pressure (sort of the equivalent of the bag on a bagpipe) whilst one is breathing in. The cheeks can be squeezed to provide uninterrupted air pressure long enough to allow breath intake until the player can resume the air pressure via the diaphragm.

        The second technique involves breathing in through the nose whilst breathing out through the mouth so that there are two streams of air going through the widepipe in opposite directions. Now Bulgarian kaval takes very little breath pressure (as I know, being a player of Bulgarian, Macedonian, and Romanian kaval/caval). Furthermore, Nikolay does it without ever puffing out his cheeks--he uses the second of the above techniques. It allows long, extenuated phrasing and rapid playing without interruption.

        It strikes me that one would need to master both techniques and then apply them to panpipes to see if either will work. Quite possibly, the movement of the instrument past the lips just might upset the flow and the pressure enough as the breath flow passes between tubes, such that control and intonation are lost. I don't know, I'm just speculating. Any other players out there who know about this?

        Craig Packard

        Brad wrote:

        >>It is called circular breathing... On the panflute I don't think it could
        be done. But on some instruments with a lot of resistance it is possible to
        get a moment of reserve air in the cheeks which are expelled by the muscles
        (like bellows or a bagpipe) at the same moment one inhales through the
        nostrils. It takes a coordination that feels unnatural.. to blow out at the
        same moment as breathing in.. Without losing or interrupting the sound in
        the process. It would seem not possible on the panflute.. but who knows...??

        Aloha.. brad

        Brad White
        Honolulu, Hawaii
        The sound of the panflute inspires mystery & wonder...
        http://pan-flute.com <<
      • bnglydll
        If there really is a technique of inhaling and exhaling at the same time (i.e. two columns of air in opposite directions within the trachea) I can t begin to
        Message 3 of 23 , Sep 1, 2000
          If there really is a technique of inhaling and exhaling at the same time
          (i.e. two columns of air in opposite directions within the trachea) I can't
          begin to imagine how it's done.
          Phenomenal.
          Dave
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Craig Packard" <Craig@...>
          To: <panflute-world@egroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, September 01, 2000 1:14 PM
          Subject: [panflute-world] Circular breathing


          >
          > In response to Brad's note, I can add a little, although I'm not a
          circular breather myself.
          >
          > Circular breathing occurs widely in Eastern European instrumental music.
          Virtually all the zurla/zurna players use it continuously. I've seen a fair
          number of clarinet players use it, too. The most unusual instance has been
          (for me) recent--this past weekend, in fact--when I realized that my
          Bulgarian kaval-playing friend Nikolay Doktorov uses it all the time.
          Bulgarian kaval, by the way, is a long end-blown wooden flute.
          >
          > So, there are at least two quite different techniques in use that I know
          of. One involves using the cheeks as a reservoir of air pressure (sort of
          the equivalent of the bag on a bagpipe) whilst one is breathing in. The
          cheeks can be squeezed to provide uninterrupted air pressure long enough to
          allow breath intake until the player can resume the air pressure via the
          diaphragm.
          >
          > The second technique involves breathing in through the nose whilst
          breathing out through the mouth so that there are two streams of air going
          through the widepipe in opposite directions. Now Bulgarian kaval takes very
          little breath pressure (as I know, being a player of Bulgarian, Macedonian,
          and Romanian kaval/caval). Furthermore, Nikolay does it without ever
          puffing out his cheeks--he uses the second of the above techniques. It
          allows long, extenuated phrasing and rapid playing without interruption.
          >
          > It strikes me that one would need to master both techniques and then apply
          them to panpipes to see if either will work. Quite possibly, the movement of
          the instrument past the lips just might upset the flow and the pressure
          enough as the breath flow passes between tubes, such that control and
          intonation are lost. I don't know, I'm just speculating. Any other players
          out there who know about this?
          >
          > Craig Packard
          >
          > Brad wrote:
          >
          > >>It is called circular breathing... On the panflute I don't think it
          could
          > be done. But on some instruments with a lot of resistance it is possible
          to
          > get a moment of reserve air in the cheeks which are expelled by the
          muscles
          > (like bellows or a bagpipe) at the same moment one inhales through the
          > nostrils. It takes a coordination that feels unnatural.. to blow out at
          the
          > same moment as breathing in.. Without losing or interrupting the sound in
          > the process. It would seem not possible on the panflute.. but who
          knows...??
          >
          > Aloha.. brad
          >
          > Brad White
          > Honolulu, Hawaii
          > The sound of the panflute inspires mystery & wonder...
          > http://pan-flute.com <<
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Marilyn J. Heed
          I have also seen circular breathing done--it s extremely fascinating and amazing to watch. Marilyn ... From: Tommy [mailto:toomas.toimeta@mail.ee] Sent:
          Message 4 of 23 , Sep 1, 2000
            I have also seen circular breathing done--it's extremely fascinating and
            amazing to watch.

            Marilyn

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Tommy [mailto:toomas.toimeta@...]
            Sent: Friday, September 01, 2000 11:20 PM
            To: panflute-world@egroups.com
            Subject: Re: [panflute-world] Circular breathing



            Sure it is phenomenal, but we had a guy here from Australia playing
            digeridoo, and he did it for about an hour WITHOUT MAKING ENY PAUSE IN THE
            SOUND ! So I cant believe it, but I´ ve seen it
            Tommy :-)
          • bnglydll
            Hello All , I can see how this effect is achieved with a wind instrument which offers resistance to the player s airflow (i.e. the use of the cheeks or upper
            Message 5 of 23 , Sep 1, 2000
              Hello All ,
              I can see how this effect is achieved with a wind instrument which offers resistance to the player's airflow (i.e. the use of the cheeks or upper lip to store air and "squeeze" it out as the lungs draw more air in). What I can't get my head around is the technique last described which is the simultaneous inhalation and exhalalation of breath via the trachea (windpipe).
              I cannot see what mechanics are at work here. How can the lungs expell air at the same time as drawing it in????.
              Dave
               
              Dave Pighills
              Bingley , West Yorkshire
              United Kingdom.
            • Brad White
              ... Good question Dave.. When you inhale (breathing in) your skeletal muscles and the diaphragm contract, which then enlarge the chest cavity and cause the
              Message 6 of 23 , Sep 1, 2000
                >How can the lungs expell air at the same time as drawing it in????. Dave
                > Dave Pighills
                >Bingley , West Yorkshire
                >United Kingdom.

                Good question Dave.. When you inhale (breathing in) your skeletal muscles
                and the diaphragm contract, which then enlarge the chest cavity and cause
                the lungs to draw in air. This creates a partial vacuum in the thoracic
                cavity, air passes through the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and then
                into the two bronchi to the lungs. (I just looked this up!!)

                So it would not seem possible to actually do both (inhale and exhale) at
                the same moment.. I should think it would be neccesary to have some reserve
                (like the mouth and cheeks) ready to exhale while the lungs inflate.

                Aloha.. brad

                Brad White
                Honolulu, Hawaii
                The sound of the panflute inspires mystery & wonder...
                http://pan-flute.com
              • Tommy
                Sure it is phenomenal, but we had a guy here from Australia playing digeridoo, and he did it for about an hour WITHOUT MAKING ENY PAUSE IN THE SOUND ! So I
                Message 7 of 23 , Sep 1, 2000
                  Sure it is phenomenal, but we had a guy here from Australia playing
                  digeridoo, and he did it for about an hour WITHOUT MAKING ENY PAUSE IN THE
                  SOUND ! So I cant believe it, but I´ ve seen it
                  Tommy :-)
                • Joeri Murk
                  Very well explained Brad, bravo, well done I agree with you Joeri
                  Message 8 of 23 , Sep 2, 2000
                    Very well explained Brad, bravo, well done

                    I  agree with you

                    Joeri

                    Good question Dave.. When you inhale (breathing in) your skeletal muscles
                    and the diaphragm contract, which then enlarge the chest cavity and cause
                    the lungs to draw in air. This creates a partial vacuum in the thoracic
                    cavity, air passes through the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and then
                    into the two bronchi to the lungs. (I just looked this up!!)

                    So it would not seem possible to actually do both (inhale and exhale) at
                    the same moment.. I should think it would be neccesary to have some reserve
                    (like the mouth and cheeks) ready to exhale while the lungs inflate.

                    Aloha.. brad

                  • bnglydll
                    Hi Stefano , agreed.......here is the only way I can think such a thing could be achieved.....using each lung independently!!!! (one inhaling and one
                    Message 9 of 23 , Sep 4, 2000
                      Hi Stefano ,
                      agreed.......here is the only way I can think such a thing could be
                      achieved.....using each lung independently!!!!
                      (one inhaling and one exhaling). I'm half joking of course
                      as there is only one diaphragm.....maybe there is a monk in tibet that can
                      do this , I doubt it though.
                      Myself and Alan were discussing this on the telephone the other day.....he
                      reminded me that the great flautist James Gallway employs this techniqe on
                      orchestral flute....so maybe there is a way for panflute.....Alan , I
                      believe you are trying to check on this with your Romanan friends.
                      Dave
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Stefano Gay" <stefano.gay@...>
                      To: <panflute-world@egroups.com>
                      Sent: Monday, September 04, 2000 9:33 AM
                      Subject: R: [panflute-world] Circular breathing


                      >
                      > Hi Brad and Dave,
                      >
                      > I agree with you that it seems impossible to inhale and exhale at the same
                      > time ... unless it is something really sophisticated like things that some
                      > yogis apparently do ...
                      >
                      > As far as the other method goes, that is using air in the mouth, I had a
                      > very exiting surprise when I tried the exercise suggested in your link; I
                      > managed almost immediately to blow continuosly by a straw into a glass of
                      > water ! I was very surprised to watch the bubbles going on and on without
                      > any interruption for as long as I wanted ! So easy !
                      >
                      > In fact I realized I had used that sort of "circular breathing" (if you
                      can
                      > call it so, which is not proper name in my opinion) each time I blew up a
                      > football ball for my children...
                      >
                      > This morning before going to work I tried making a continuous sound with
                      the
                      > panflute... no way, it seems impossible because of the low pressure and
                      the
                      > different shaping of the lips... I'm going to try with the recorder soon,
                      > but I doubt it will work...
                      >
                      > Very interesting subject, anyway.
                      >
                      > Ciao a tutti - Stefano Roma-Italia
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > -----Messaggio originale-----
                      > Da: Brad White [mailto:whiteb001@...]
                      > Inviato: sabato 2 settembre 2000 1.06
                      > A: panflute-world@egroups.com
                      > Oggetto: Re: [panflute-world] Circular breathing
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > >How can the lungs expell air at the same time as drawing it in????. Dave
                      > > Dave Pighills
                      > >Bingley , West Yorkshire
                      > >United Kingdom.
                      >
                      > Good question Dave.. When you inhale (breathing in) your skeletal muscles
                      > and the diaphragm contract, which then enlarge the chest cavity and cause
                      > the lungs to draw in air. This creates a partial vacuum in the thoracic
                      > cavity, air passes through the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and then
                      > into the two bronchi to the lungs. (I just looked this up!!)
                      >
                      > So it would not seem possible to actually do both (inhale and exhale) at
                      > the same moment.. I should think it would be neccesary to have some
                      reserve
                      > (like the mouth and cheeks) ready to exhale while the lungs inflate.
                      >
                      > Aloha.. brad
                      >
                      > Brad White
                      > Honolulu, Hawaii
                      > The sound of the panflute inspires mystery & wonder...
                      > http://pan-flute.com
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Ken Webster
                      Hi All I Don t believe it is possible to have two streams of air going both ways through a persons wind pipe at the same time. The lungs are just a bag that
                      Message 10 of 23 , Sep 5, 2000
                        Hi All

                        I Don't believe it is possible to have two streams of air going
                        both ways through a persons wind pipe at the same time.
                        The lungs are just a bag that can either inhale or exhale, only
                        one thing at a time. All circular breathing techniques I know of
                        use the mouth cavity as a reservoir. There are two basic techniques using either the cheeks or tongue to alter mouth
                        cavity volume. The tongue can be used like a piston to expel
                        small amounts of air from the mouth. This is a well known
                        technique and explains circular breathing without obvious
                        cheek inflation.

                        For those of you trying circular breathing, its like anything else,
                        you get better with practice. While it is simple to blow a
                        continuous stream of bubbles through a straw it is a little more
                        difficult to circular breathe a didj and most difficult on a flute.
                        So exercises need to be progressive in difficulty. As a guide
                        the lower the back pressure the more difficult it is to circular
                        breathe. A long small bore didj (30 mm) is relatively easy. My
                        suggestion is a series of PVC Didj's is an easy and inexpensive
                        way to proceed, fun too.


                        Ken Webster websterk@...



                        >>> "Craig Packard" <Craig@...> 09/01 11:14 PM >>>

                        In response to Brad's note, I can add a little, although I'm not a circular breather myself.

                        Circular breathing occurs widely in Eastern European instrumental music. Virtually all the zurla/zurna players use it continuously. I've seen a fair number of clarinet players use it, too. The most unusual instance has been (for me) recent--this past weekend, in fact--when I realized that my Bulgarian kaval-playing friend Nikolay Doktorov uses it all the time. Bulgarian kaval, by the way, is a long end-blown wooden flute.

                        So, there are at least two quite different techniques in use that I know of. One involves using the cheeks as a reservoir of air pressure (sort of the equivalent of the bag on a bagpipe) whilst one is breathing in. The cheeks can be squeezed to provide uninterrupted air pressure long enough to allow breath intake until the player can resume the air pressure via the diaphragm.

                        The second technique involves breathing in through the nose whilst breathing out through the mouth so that there are two streams of air going through the widepipe in opposite directions. Now Bulgarian kaval takes very little breath pressure (as I know, being a player of Bulgarian, Macedonian, and Romanian kaval/caval). Furthermore, Nikolay does it without ever puffing out his cheeks--he uses the second of the above techniques. It allows long, extenuated phrasing and rapid playing without interruption.

                        It strikes me that one would need to master both techniques and then apply them to panpipes to see if either will work. Quite possibly, the movement of the instrument past the lips just might upset the flow and the pressure enough as the breath flow passes between tubes, such that control and intonation are lost. I don't know, I'm just speculating. Any other players out there who know about this?

                        Craig Packard

                        Brad wrote:

                        >>It is called circular breathing... On the panflute I don't think it could
                        be done. But on some instruments with a lot of resistance it is possible to
                        get a moment of reserve air in the cheeks which are expelled by the muscles
                        (like bellows or a bagpipe) at the same moment one inhales through the
                        nostrils. It takes a coordination that feels unnatural.. to blow out at the
                        same moment as breathing in.. Without losing or interrupting the sound in
                        the process. It would seem not possible on the panflute.. but who knows...??

                        Aloha.. brad

                        Brad White
                        Honolulu, Hawaii
                        The sound of the panflute inspires mystery & wonder...
                        http://pan-flute.com <<
                      • kbudd@interlog.com
                        I had a long talk with Damian Draghici last night, and one thing he suggested to help with circular breathing is as follows: Instead of taking in air and then
                        Message 11 of 23 , Sep 19, 2000
                          I had a long talk with Damian Draghici last night, and one thing he
                          suggested to help with circular breathing is as follows:

                          Instead of taking in air and then blowing it out through a straw to make
                          bubbles, while breathing in,
                          take a good mouthful of water, and carefully squeeze it out with a tiny
                          opening, while breathing in (through your nose!)

                          The water allows you develop a greater sense of the pressure and control
                          need than the air does.

                          Kevin Budd
                        • Tommy
                          Well talkin about circular breathin in pan-pipes. I can do circular breathing in my didje and ocarina, but not in pan. I mean - my panpipe needs quite a lot
                          Message 12 of 23 , Sep 21, 2000
                            Well talkin about circular breathin in pan-pipes. I can do circular
                            breathing in my didje and ocarina, but not in pan. I mean - my panpipe needs
                            quite a lot of air. I tryed with emty glass bottle, and it was mush easyer
                            than with my flute. Maybe there is something wrong with my flute ? As this
                            was the only one i got in this desert (three different models - i bought
                            the one with 21 pipes, made by GEWA, Gemany) and I never used a panpipe
                            before, I am not really sure about its goodness. As I told once before, it
                            is made of Bergahorn (a sort of maple growing in mountains...)
                            Well - so I just bought some PVC today, and try to make one panpipe myself.
                            But - what is the "magical" thing i ´m going to close the end of the PVC ?
                            Thanks
                            Tommy :-)
                          • Kevin Budd
                            ... As a composer, I wonder how you would write this in the score? It must take a great deal of training to control one s face colours lke that! It is probably
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jun 29, 2002
                              Ulli wrote:

                              > flutist ( flauto traverso ) Istvan Matuz, who played one long note,
                              > about 10 minutes, holding a stepless glissando from c1 to c3, over
                              > two oktaves without break. His face changed from red to violet to
                              > green and yello during that perfomance.

                              As a composer, I wonder how you would write this in the score? It must take a
                              great deal of training to control one's face colours lke that! It is probably
                              harder than circular breathing. I would think that turning blue would be
                              possible too. If he can also do orange, then all colours of the rainbow are available.

                              Kevin (usually pinkish)
                            • pan27de
                              ...interesting discussion ! I tryed alot the circular breathing. Well, no problem on the didgeridoo for me, but on the panflute it s difficult to hold the
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jun 29, 2002
                                ...interesting discussion !
                                I tryed alot the circular breathing. Well, no problem on the
                                didgeridoo for me, but on the panflute it's difficult to hold the
                                intonation during one note. So it's much more easy for the flats and
                                sharps, and that most easy from about g2 to g3. The most impressing
                                experience with circularbreathing I had in a concert of the hungarian
                                flutist ( flauto traverso ) Istvan Matuz, who played one long note,
                                about 10 minutes, holding a stepless glissando from c1 to c3, over
                                two oktaves without break. His face changed from red to violet to
                                green and yello during that perfomance. It was a concert of
                                avandgarde, organised from my fluteprofessor Jochen Gärtner.
                                Go on making experiments, that's very important !!!
                                regards, Ulli
                              • davepighills
                                Hi Ulli, that is fascinating.....you play didgeridoo also?. I wanted to talk about circular breathing with you in Delft but so much was happening I forgot!!.
                                Message 15 of 23 , Jun 30, 2002
                                  Hi Ulli,

                                  that is fascinating.....you play didgeridoo also?. I wanted to talk
                                  about circular breathing with you in Delft but so much was happening
                                  I forgot!!.

                                  Istvan Matuz playing for 10 minutes with one breath...that is
                                  amazing. I would love to have seen those colour changes on his face!!

                                  Best wishes

                                  Dave


                                  --- In panflute-world@y..., "pan27de" <pan27de@y...> wrote:
                                  > ...interesting discussion !
                                  > I tryed alot the circular breathing. Well, no problem on the
                                  > didgeridoo for me, but on the panflute it's difficult to hold the
                                  > intonation during one note. So it's much more easy for the flats
                                  and
                                  > sharps, and that most easy from about g2 to g3. The most impressing
                                  > experience with circularbreathing I had in a concert of the
                                  hungarian
                                  > flutist ( flauto traverso ) Istvan Matuz, who played one long note,
                                  > about 10 minutes, holding a stepless glissando from c1 to c3, over
                                  > two oktaves without break. His face changed from red to violet to
                                  > green and yello during that perfomance. It was a concert of
                                  > avandgarde, organised from my fluteprofessor Jochen Gärtner.
                                  > Go on making experiments, that's very important !!!
                                  > regards, Ulli
                                • davepighills
                                  Hi Kevin, mmmm......now I realise why I flunked my biology classes. The ability of the Chameleon lizard to change colour is really down to its inbred
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Jun 30, 2002
                                    Hi Kevin,

                                    mmmm......now I realise why I flunked my biology classes. The ability
                                    of the Chameleon lizard to change colour is really down to its inbred
                                    propensity to practice circular breathing. Given that we all know
                                    that Lizards make great woodwind players (second only to Small Dogs
                                    held by Romanian Virtuosi...full marks by the way....prize on its way)
                                    I suspect it is only a matter of time before we have a Kimodo Dragon
                                    on stage playing panflute. I would have preferred the first non-human
                                    Panflute player to have been a fish (rather than dog or lizard) as
                                    they do not have a problem with scales.

                                    And why didn't Pan himslef play a horn??? oh dear!! :-)


                                    Best wishes

                                    Dave (bit green actually)


                                    >
                                    > As a composer, I wonder how you would write this in the score? It
                                    must take a
                                    > great deal of training to control one's face colours lke that! It
                                    is probably
                                    > harder than circular breathing. I would think that turning blue
                                    would be
                                    > possible too. If he can also do orange, then all colours of the
                                    rainbow are available.
                                    >
                                    > Kevin (usually pinkish)
                                  • chang5887099
                                    Hello, Ulli, Dave, Kevin, Marilyn, David, Brad, etc.. All of you are so fun and humorous. Does any of you have better training materials on Circular
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Jun 30, 2002
                                      Hello, Ulli, Dave, Kevin, Marilyn, David, Brad, etc..
                                      All of you are so fun and humorous. Does any of you have better
                                      training materials on Circular Breathing? Very welcome to share it.
                                      I remember I once mailed Mr. Chao's VCD to Brad. In that VCD, his
                                      two great students did a very good job on Circular Breathing on
                                      Chinese Flute. And their facial actions are shown very clear. If
                                      any of you have interest in it, you can go to Brad's house to watch
                                      it before I get another copy for you. Brad, is that OK?
                                      Thank you first!
                                      Hi, Ulli,
                                      I really want to see the playing without pause for 10 minutes.
                                      Not for skill, but for the colorful "face'. Very fun. When Eric
                                      goes to visit you in August, you can have a good talk on Circular
                                      Breathing with him.
                                      Best wishes
                                      Chung-liang
                                    • Brad White
                                      ... Sure.. everyone is welcome.. Come on over... brad Aloha & Groetjes, Brad White Honolulu, Hawaii & Delft, Netherlands The sound of the panflute inspires
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Jun 30, 2002
                                        >If
                                        >any of you have interest in it, you can go to Brad's house to watch
                                        >it before I get another copy for you. Brad, is that OK?

                                        Sure.. everyone is welcome.. Come on over... brad

                                        Aloha & Groetjes,

                                        Brad White
                                        Honolulu, Hawaii & Delft, Netherlands
                                        The sound of the panflute inspires mystery & wonder...
                                        http://pan-flute.com
                                        For AOL click below..
                                        <a href="http://pan-flute.com">click here</a>
                                      • Costel Puscoiu
                                        Dear panflute friends, One year ago Matthijs Koene (a verry good young Duch panflutist) give his examen for the soloist diploma in the Wester Church (Amsterdam
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Jul 2, 2002
                                          Dear panflute friends,
                                           
                                          One year ago Matthijs Koene (a verry good young Duch panflutist) give his examen for the soloist diploma in the Wester Church (Amsterdam - the Nedelands). He was a student of the Amsterdams Conservatorium.
                                           
                                          I know from long time that this technique of circular breathing exist and I hear that on different other instruments.
                                           
                                          In his concert (only with new compositions of contemporary music) Matthijs has present also a piece with circular breathing: Long Breath (for panflute and soundtracks) composed by the Dutch composer Wim de Ruiter (born 1943).
                                          So like the titel say, Matthijs play verry long notes (4 till 5 minutes) in the beginning and at the eind of the piece. He can play verry good with this technicque of circular breathing. The sound of his panflute was verry good and equal.
                                           
                                          Greetings,
                                           
                                          Costel Puscoiu
                                           
                                           
                                           
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