Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Building a carrying case

Expand Messages
  • george700dl
    I scanned some old postings (dating back to 2002 and such) and saw a few references to building your own cases. I m considering building a few. I m a pretty
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2005
      I scanned some old postings (dating back to 2002 and such) and saw a
      few references to building your own cases. I'm considering building a
      few. I'm a pretty handy woodworker, but some pictures + directions
      from others who have done it already could save me some time. It is
      also easy to buy an empty case (online, for instance), or get a
      cheaper attache and "gut it out". Then you'd make your own custom-fit
      padding.

      I've heard of people using foam rubber, but there is, I believe,
      another way: Have you heard of "Great Stuff" insulation foam? It's
      used for insulating walls of your house, tight spots, etc. Readily
      available in Home Depot or other hardware stores. You spray the gooey
      substance into the space, and it expands 4x to form material that is
      almost like styrofoam. It should be completely non-toxic when done.

      Anyone ever tried this?

      George
    • Brad White
      ... I like cases that can hold several instruments.... I had a case with a bass panflute, I sold the panflute and kept the case :) I can put in my Tenor and
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2005
        On Dec 1, 2005, at 4:10 AM, george700dl wrote:

        > It is
        > also easy to buy an empty case (online, for instance), or get a
        > cheaper attache and "gut it out". Then you'd make your own custom-fit
        > padding.

        I like cases that can hold several instruments.... I had a case with a
        bass panflute, I sold the panflute and kept the case :) I can put in
        my Tenor and an Alto and a few miscellaneous Irish whistles and such..

        For airplane travel I bought one of the Rimowa aluminum and magnesium
        carry-on's... I put some foam rubber on the top and bottom and can
        carry alot of flutes. They are really protected and it takes the
        worry out of transporting my precious instruments... brad

        "Rimowa Topas Trolleys Cases

        The Rimowa Topas Trolley luggage line offers the strength and
        durability of aluminum and magnesium in a hardsided case wheel around
        suitcase. The Rimowa Topas combines a sleek European design with the
        classic silver Rimowa grooved aluminum design to create the Rimowa
        Topas line of trolleys. The Rimowa Topas suitcases are beautiful to the
        eye but rugged enough to withstand the rigors of modern travel with
        strenth and style. The Rimowa Topas Cabin Trolley is small enough to
        qualify as carry-on with most airlines."
      • Kevin Budd
        ... I have not tried it George, but if you do , be aware that the foam can exert a lot of pressure, so you might use something the size and shape of a real pan
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 1, 2005
          On 1-Dec-05, at 9:10 AM, george700dl wrote:
          >
          > I've heard of people using foam rubber, but there is, I believe,
          > another way: Have you heard of "Great Stuff" insulation foam? It's
          > used for insulating walls of your house, tight spots, etc. Readily
          > available in Home Depot or other hardware stores. You spray the gooey
          > substance into the space, and it expands 4x to form material that is
          > almost like styrofoam. It should be completely non-toxic when done.

          I have not tried it George, but if you do , be aware that the foam
          can exert a lot of pressure, so you might use something the size and
          shape of a real pan flute but not the actual instrument. Put it in a
          plastic bag so the foam can expand around it, and so you can remove
          the form after. The foam is really sticky. It often expands to three
          times its original volume. It will be a challenge to get just the
          right amount of foam. You may even have to tie your case closed while
          it's expanding. Some window manufacturers void warranties if you use
          expanding sealant, because the expanding pressure can warp the window
          frame. There are several "minimal-expanding foams" too, they might be
          easier to use.

          Kevin
        • george700dl
          Yeah, it s a pain. I actually tried it a few years ago with an old attache that was too beaten up to be useful for anything business- related (I tend to wear
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 1, 2005
            Yeah, it's a pain. I actually tried it a few years ago with an old
            attache that was too beaten up to be useful for anything business-
            related (I tend to wear these things out fast). I underestimated the
            expansion factor, but the nice things is, it can be sanded down to
            shape very easily if it overexpands.

            The problem with closing the case while the foam is curing is, it
            will never fully cure. It needs a lot of oxygen.

            But I'll play with that idea again, for this next instrument I'm
            building (16 pipes, flamed bamboo). Home Depot sells a nice aluminum
            tool case for less than 20 USD that's just about the right size. If
            I could somehow get the foam into the right shape and cover it with
            some black fabric, it would look extremely cool.

            George



            --- In panflute-world@yahoogroups.com, Kevin Budd <kbudd@i...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > On 1-Dec-05, at 9:10 AM, george700dl wrote:
            > >
            > > I've heard of people using foam rubber, but there is, I believe,
            > > another way: Have you heard of "Great Stuff" insulation foam?
            It's
            > > used for insulating walls of your house, tight spots, etc.
            Readily
            > > available in Home Depot or other hardware stores. You spray the
            gooey
            > > substance into the space, and it expands 4x to form material
            that is
            > > almost like styrofoam. It should be completely non-toxic when
            done.
            >
            > I have not tried it George, but if you do , be aware that the
            foam
            > can exert a lot of pressure, so you might use something the size
            and
            > shape of a real pan flute but not the actual instrument. Put it in
            a
            > plastic bag so the foam can expand around it, and so you can
            remove
            > the form after. The foam is really sticky. It often expands to
            three
            > times its original volume. It will be a challenge to get just the
            > right amount of foam. You may even have to tie your case closed
            while
            > it's expanding. Some window manufacturers void warranties if you
            use
            > expanding sealant, because the expanding pressure can warp the
            window
            > frame. There are several "minimal-expanding foams" too, they might
            be
            > easier to use.
            >
            > Kevin
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.