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Frangipangi Needs Help

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  • Vicki L
    Howdy doo to Volcanites.  I have been babying a frangipangi stick with one leaf for MONTHS.  Any advice on the best place to spring it into growth?  I am
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 8, 2012
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      Howdy doo to Volcanites.  I have been babying a frangipangi stick with one leaf for MONTHS.  Any advice on the best place to spring it into growth?  I am hoping to wean myself from the fragrance of Angel Trumpets and have Frangipangi instead?  Okay...that isn't the truth, just want to get this poor stick to go.  It has one little leaf on top and the starts of two small ones but hasn't grown in over eight months.  I have it in a nice little pot with well draining soil...I have put some fertilizer on it a few times.
    • Lonnie Cross
      Hey Vicki, I don t even know what frangipangi is. One thing I can tell you is that PH is very important to most plants. Get yourself a test kit to check the
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 8, 2012
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        Hey Vicki,

        I don't even know what frangipangi  is. One thing I can tell you is that "PH" is very important to most plants. Get yourself a test kit to check the acidity/alkalinity of your soil. Google  "ph for frangipangi ".

        When you get your test kit, please post where you got it.


        Lonnie a Norte Americano in Puerto Armuelles, Panama

        "Great Wit and Madness are Near Allied, But Thin Partitions Do their Bounds Divide"





         

        Howdy doo to Volcanites.  I have been babying a frangipangi stick with one leaf for MONTHS.  Any advice on the best place to spring it into growth?  I am hoping to wean myself from the fragrance of Angel Trumpets and have Frangipangi instead?  Okay...that isn't the truth, just want to get this poor stick to go.  It has one little leaf on top and the starts of two small ones but hasn't grown in over eight months.  I have it in a nice little pot with well draining soil...I have put some fertilizer on it a few times.


      • S Flynn
        Hi Vicki, I happened to visit the Botanical Garden in New Orleans last week and noticed the beautiful (and fragrant) plumeria growing there.  It was growing
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 8, 2012
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          Hi Vicki, I happened to visit the Botanical Garden in New Orleans last week and noticed the beautiful (and fragrant) plumeria growing there.  It was growing in full sun.  I wondered about growing some myself.  The information below came from a website I found which talked about the fine line between sun and watering.

          "In order to get the most of a plumeria plant, with respect to heartiness, growth, size, blooms, and scent, there is a fine line of balance that must be maintained. Ideally, a plumeria is in its element when it can have as much sun as is possible. However, it must be quickly noted that along with a long day of sun, an equal amount of water must be maintained in the soil. In other words, if a plumeria plant gets maximum sunlight and appropriate water , as to maintain soil moistness just below a state of dryness, it will flourish to its maximum potential. On the other hand, if the plant receives a lesser amount of sun, then a lesser amount of watering is necessary - again, to ensure that soil moistness stays just below the dry state. The more sun, the more water. The less sun, the less water. A common mistake of novice plumeria growers is to overwater the plant when it is not able to be exposed to as much sun as is could be, thereby resulting in a rotted root system. Conversely, if a plumeria plant is able to receive maximum exposure to the sun, but they aren't watered enough, the plant will do like all other plants that are exposed to excessive sunlight without water - they will die. To summarize, give your plumeria as much sunlight as is possible and make sure to keep the soil just below the state of dryness."


        • betsywaddington
          Hola Vicki, I live near Caldera, at about 1200 ft altitude, by the river Papayal. We have several frangipani trees on our property that we planted, and several
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 9, 2012
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            Hola Vicki,

            I live near Caldera, at about 1200 ft altitude, by the river Papayal.
            We have several frangipani trees on our property that we planted, and several growing naturally on the river bank. We have trees with both white and pink flowers. It's important that these have good drainage and plenty of sun. Here's a website with some excellent information:

            http://www.sacredgardenfrangipanis.com/frangipani_growing_advice.php

            These are also called Plumeria.
            Good luck and hope you'll soon be smelling the wonderful fragrance of these flowers, in your garden.

            Betsy

            --- In panama_gardening@yahoogroups.com, "Vicki L" <holdranoray@...> wrote:
            >
            > Howdy doo to Volcanites.  I have been babying a frangipangi stick with one leaf for MONTHS.  Any advice on the best place to spring it into growth?  I am hoping to wean myself from the fragrance of Angel Trumpets and have Frangipangi instead?  Okay...that isn't the truth, just want to get this poor stick to go.  It has one little leaf on top and the starts of two small ones but hasn't grown in over eight months.  I have it in a nice little pot with well draining soil...I have put some fertilizer on it a few times.
            >
          • ridgelandres
            Vicki, I, too, have trouble getting my frangipani to thrive here in Boquete. It was given to me by a friend who lives in Brisas, south of town in Alto Boquete,
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 12, 2012
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              Vicki,

              I, too, have trouble getting my frangipani to thrive here in Boquete. It was given to me by a friend who lives in Brisas, south of town in Alto Boquete, and who has beautiful frangipani. I note that Betsy lives in Caldera, also south of Boquete and at a lower elevation. I, on the other hand, live north of town, in the Palo Alto community, at a higher altitude. I therefore suspect it's the climate. You and I may live in areas just too cool for a frangipani to be happy. These microclimates are as tough on plants as they are on people.

              Bonnie
              Palo Alto, Boquete

              --- In panama_gardening@yahoogroups.com, "betsywaddington" <betsywaddington@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hola Vicki,
              >
              > I live near Caldera, at about 1200 ft altitude, by the river Papayal.
              > We have several frangipani trees on our property that we planted, and several growing naturally on the river bank. We have trees with both white and pink flowers. It's important that these have good drainage and plenty of sun. Here's a website with some excellent information:
              >
              > http://www.sacredgardenfrangipanis.com/frangipani_growing_advice.php
              >
              > These are also called Plumeria.
              > Good luck and hope you'll soon be smelling the wonderful fragrance of these flowers, in your garden.
              >
              > Betsy
              >
              > --- In panama_gardening@yahoogroups.com, "Vicki L" <holdranoray@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Howdy doo to Volcanites.  I have been babying a frangipangi stick with one leaf for MONTHS.  Any advice on the best place to spring it into growth?  I am hoping to wean myself from the fragrance of Angel Trumpets and have Frangipangi instead?  Okay...that isn't the truth, just want to get this poor stick to go.  It has one little leaf on top and the starts of two small ones but hasn't grown in over eight months.  I have it in a nice little pot with well draining soil...I have put some fertilizer on it a few times.
              > >
              >
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