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Re: Language Movement of Pakistan

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  • abrar@home.com
    Dear Tariq nMahmood Khan, Asalamoalakum, Are you happy now? Actually I do not feel comfortable with words which are not English like wrora, pakhair raghley,
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 1, 2001
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      Dear Tariq nMahmood Khan, Asalamoalakum,
      Are you happy now? Actually I do not feel comfortable with words
      which are not English like wrora, pakhair raghley, starey mushe etc
      that is why I, in a flow, miss to write salam. My intension are not
      bad at all. Also I have the habit of writing like Mirza Ghalib. So I
      have the same problem with my Urdu writing as well. I do not write
      formal letters. I have absolutely different way in expressing myself.
      Any how I will be extra careful next time. I apologize for my
      weakness.
      I am glad that you have converted my uncle from red to green. Thanx.
      I agree with you on Arabic language. I was only saying that with a
      little effort Arabic speaking may be possible for those who are
      fluent with Holy Quran. Also those who can read Holy Quran can
      possibly read Urdu with a little effort.
      Yours,
      Abrar
      > Abrar Khana,
      > Assalamo-alaikom. Before every thing else, I will ask you one
      favour please
      > do notdeny me the favour of starting your message with a proper
      Islamic
      > Assalam-alaikom. It is not only a very good du'a to a brother
      Muslim but is
      > also obligatory. In a hadith sharif it is asid pay salaam to all,
      those whom
      > you and those you do not know.
      >
      > You said: "I feel strange when I notice that almost every Muslim
      can read
      > Holy Quran and still called an illiterate. With a little effort
      every Muslim
      > who can read Quran can understand Arabic
      > with the help of a translation".And are right, most of Muslims in
      our
      > country can read the Arabic script of Holy Qur'an. That, however,
      does not
      > make them literate in the technical sense of the term. To be a
      literate you
      > need to be able to read a passage in any language and understand its
      > meanings. Also be able to write a passage which another literate
      person can
      > read and understand. Any way the ability to read Qur'an places the
      Muslim
      > masses at an advantageous position to grow towards literacy. It is
      like
      > several other bounties of Islam. It also helps Pakistanis to learn
      Urdu and
      > Arabic more easily.
      >
      > Understanding Qur'an, according to me, does not mean getting the
      sense from
      > a translation. Holy Qur'an, in being the last message of Allah has
      been
      > endowed with an ability to last till the end of this world, meet
      the needs
      > of all persons, for all times and in any environment. It has the
      miraculous
      > capability of meeting these needs of who so ever desires it.
      Translation by
      > any person, however, scholarly he/she may be, only satisfies
      his/her [the
      > translator] needs, and only for the occasion when the translation
      was made.
      > To get the message from Allah direct, one need to understand the
      Word of
      > Allah Ta'ala. Translations, tafsir or any commentaries are not the
      Words of
      > Allah.
      > Tariq
      >
      > From: <abrar@h...>
      > Subject: Fw: [pakhtu] Re: Language Movement of Pakistan
      >
      >
      > Dear Tariq Mahmood Khan,
      > I feel strange when I notice that almost
      every
      > Muslim can read Holy Quran and still called an illiterate. With a
      little
      > effort every Muslim who can read Quran can understand Arabic
      > with the help of a translation. I was told that Pakistanis in
      Saudi Arabia
      > pick up Arabic pretty quick. Even those who can read Arabic can
      easily read
      > Urdu. I have seen illiterate Mullas trying to read
      > Urdu. They read Habib Bank Limited written in Urdu as "Habyab
      banaka
      > lumyatad. Yet it is worth the effort. My village is full of Mullas
      because
      > of two Dar-Ul-Ulums.
      > Sincerely, Abrar
    • abrar@home.com
      Dear Tariq Mahmood Khan, Asalamoalakum, Holy Quran has a very special language which was a challenge for the Arabs of the time. Arabs themselves learn to read
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 1, 2001
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        Dear Tariq Mahmood Khan, Asalamoalakum,
        Holy Quran has a very special language which was a challenge for the
        Arabs of the time. Arabs themselves learn to read Holy Quran. They
        are not an authority on the subject by birth.
        I have read Aulia-e-Kiram number of the Sayara Digest in detail and
        no Wali of the time ever asked his followers to learn Arabic. Also
        there was a decision taken by some great Ulemas of India like Bahadur
        Yar Jang etc to offer Nimaz in Arabic and read Holy Quran in Arabic
        but no learning of Arabic language to understand Quran. The Devine
        Book is self explaimnatory and the Great Message is received when
        Hidayat is given.
        I must say that virgin translation of the Holy Quran is not allowed
        to avoid possible changes. It has to be accompanied by Arabic text.
        Allah has promised to secure Quran till the end of the world so we do
        not have to worry about.
        Also Arabic changes from place tp place. I have seen Arabs who cannot
        communicate with one another.
        Sincerely,
        Abrar
        > Abrar Khana,
        > Assalamo-alaikom. Before every thing else, I will ask you one
        favour please
        > do notdeny me the favour of starting your message with a proper
        Islamic
        > Assalam-alaikom. It is not only a very good du'a to a brother
        Muslim but is
        > also obligatory. In a hadith sharif it is asid pay salaam to all,
        those whom
        > you and those you do not know.
        >
        > You said: "I feel strange when I notice that almost every Muslim
        can read
        > Holy Quran and still called an illiterate. With a little effort
        every Muslim
        > who can read Quran can understand Arabic
        > with the help of a translation".And are right, most of Muslims in
        our
        > country can read the Arabic script of Holy Qur'an. That, however,
        does not
        > make them literate in the technical sense of the term. To be a
        literate you
        > need to be able to read a passage in any language and understand its
        > meanings. Also be able to write a passage which another literate
        person can
        > read and understand. Any way the ability to read Qur'an places the
        Muslim
        > masses at an advantageous position to grow towards literacy. It is
        like
        > several other bounties of Islam. It also helps Pakistanis to learn
        Urdu and
        > Arabic more easily.
        >
        > Understanding Qur'an, according to me, does not mean getting the
        sense from
        > a translation. Holy Qur'an, in being the last message of Allah has
        been
        > endowed with an ability to last till the end of this world, meet
        the needs
        > of all persons, for all times and in any environment. It has the
        miraculous
        > capability of meeting these needs of who so ever desires it.
        Translation by
        > any person, however, scholarly he/she may be, only satisfies
        his/her [the
        > translator] needs, and only for the occasion when the translation
        was made.
        > To get the message from Allah direct, one need to understand the
        Word of
        > Allah Ta'ala. Translations, tafsir or any commentaries are not the
        Words of
        > Allah.
        > Tariq
        >
        > From: <abrar@h...>
        > Subject: Fw: [pakhtu] Re: Language Movement of Pakistan
        >
        >
        > Dear Tariq Mahmood Khan,
        > I feel strange when I notice that almost
        every
        > Muslim can read Holy Quran and still called an illiterate. With a
        little
        > effort every Muslim who can read Quran can understand Arabic
        > with the help of a translation. I was told that Pakistanis in
        Saudi Arabia
        > pick up Arabic pretty quick. Even those who can read Arabic can
        easily read
        > Urdu. I have seen illiterate Mullas trying to read
        > Urdu. They read Habib Bank Limited written in Urdu as "Habyab
        banaka
        > lumyatad. Yet it is worth the effort. My village is full of Mullas
        because
        > of two Dar-Ul-Ulums.
        > Sincerely, Abrar
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