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iPad art

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  • AlcinaN
    There are many apps available to use. I am still discovering them. To help me, I have enrolled in an online course called iPad Studio. It is an 11 month series
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 27, 2012
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      There are many apps available to use. I am still discovering them. To help me, I have enrolled in an online course called
      iPad Studio. It is an 11 month series of lessons - one per month. It has been very informative and enjoyable. You can sign up for the class @... and do it at your own pace.

      I have been doing digital art for a years with Painter, and was anxious to be able to paint on the go. I thought the iPad would be an ideal tool to do that.
      It is, once you find an app that suits your needs and working style. The one drawback is the glare on the iPad screen. You have to be careful to position yourself to avoid the glare.

      The apps are all different, with varied features. Some allow you to paint/draw as you wish. Others just modify an existing image to make it look
      like a particular medium. I like to do my own painting from life and on location.

      Holding the iPad is easier using a case from Slate Shield. It has an elasticized band for your hand on the back. The alternative easel back rotates and allows you to place the pad horizontally or vertically, at a slant or upright.

      You may go to my website and find iPad Art under albums. There you will find samples of my iPad work, with labels showing which app was used.
      You'll also see my other digital work as well as studio paintings. iPad allows me to get a bit of sketching in more often with out the hassle of materials and tools.

      I am really enjoying doing art work on the iPad.

      Alcina Nolley

      artist and jeweler
      painting and jewelry instructor
      certified instructor for silver metal clay
      http://www.alcinanolley.com
    • Linda Levy
      Does the iPad provide any pressure sensitivity? Stylus use? ______________________________________ Immediate gratification isn t quick enough!
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 27, 2012
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      • Joe
        I think the sensitivity would be application dependent. The functionality has to be programmed into the application for the pressure (width of fingertip) to be
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 27, 2012
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          I think the sensitivity would be application dependent. The functionality has to be programmed into the application for the pressure (width of fingertip) to be recognized. I dont know of any app that currently does that. Of course I don't have an iPad...only Sketch on iPhone.

          Hope this helps.
          Joe



          On 2012-03-27, at 11:26 AM, "Linda Levy" <kinglevy@...> wrote:

          =
        • Patty Woodbury
          HI, if you put this into Google, you can explore some of them: ipad pressure-sensitive painting apps Hope this helps. Patty
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 27, 2012
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            HI,
            if you put this into Google, you can explore some of them:

            ipad pressure-sensitive painting apps

            Hope this helps.
            Patty
          • Nick Mellersh
            Ipad 2 doesn t have any pressure registration.  But Brushes and probably other apps simulate it by reducing the apparent pressure according to the speed of
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 27, 2012
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              Ipad 2 doesn't have any pressure registration.  But Brushes and probably other apps simulate it by reducing the apparent pressure according to the speed of the stroke.  Seems to work quite nicely.
              Nick


              From: Joe <snak1971@...>
              To: "painterworld@yahoogroups.com" <painterworld@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, 27 March 2012, 19:57
              Subject: Re: [painterworld] iPad art

               
              I think the sensitivity would be application dependent. The functionality has to be programmed into the application for the pressure (width of fingertip) to be recognized. I dont know of any app that currently does that. Of course I don't have an iPad...only Sketch on iPhone.

              Hope this helps.
              Joe


            • Nick Mellersh
              My impression is that the Ipad does not register pressure as such, unlike the Wacom tablet.  I believe the various apps simulate it in various ways (Brushes
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 28, 2012
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                My impression is that the Ipad does not register pressure as such, unlike the Wacom tablet.  I believe the various apps simulate it in various ways (Brushes by stroke speed as I have said.)  I could be wrong though and would like to know.

                Nick.


                From: Patty Woodbury <saluki13@...>
                To: painterworld@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, 27 March 2012, 20:01
                Subject: Re: [painterworld] iPad art

                 
                HI,
                if you put this into Google, you can explore some of them:

                ipad pressure-sensitive painting apps

                Hope this helps.
                Patty



              • Jeremy Sutton
                Hi All, I ve been experimenting and have great fun drawing and painting from life with a variety of apps on the iPad. You can see some of the results at:
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 28, 2012
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                  Hi All, 

                  I've been experimenting and have great fun drawing and painting from life with a variety of apps on the iPad. You can see some of the results at:

                  I highly recommend the NomanBrush! Their web site is: http://www.nomadbrush.com. If you want to draw and paint on an iPad this is an amazing tool to use. It's very comfortable to hold and comes with either a long or short brush. I've experimented with both and prefer the long version, though I know a lot of artists like the shorter version better and feel it gives them more control. For me I find the long brush gives a looseness to the brush stroke I enjoy. The NomadBrush looks and feels like a regular brush and works well with most paint apps, though you have watch out if you press down and splay the brush hairs since some apps pick that up as a mutli-touch gesture and zoom in or out.

                  I am still exploring the wide range of iPad painting apps out there and find each has their unique strengths and weaknesses. I like the automatic recording and easy playback feature of brushes, the oily blendy brushes of ArtRage, the Sketchy brush and recording playback of Sketch Club, the elegant simplicity and cool trash action of Zen Brush and the rich brush structures of Procreate... I'll post a video comparison of them on PaintboxTV.com in the coming months. 

                  Cheers and happy painting!

                  Jeremy


                • Nick Mellersh
                  No.  But it is simulated in some apps by the speed of the stroke.  The Brushes ap I know does this.  Others too probably. Nick Mellersh
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 30, 2012
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                    No.  But it is simulated in some apps by the speed of the stroke.  The Brushes ap I know does this.  Others too probably.
                    Nick Mellersh


                    From: Linda Levy <kinglevy@...>
                    To: painterworld@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, 27 March 2012, 18:26
                    Subject: RE: [painterworld] iPad art

                  • Ann Norman
                    As a lifetime Windows user, I now have had an iPad for a few weeks. After avoiding Apple for years because of their bossiness & control-freakery, I m still
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 1, 2012
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                      As a lifetime Windows user, I now have had an iPad for a few weeks. After avoiding Apple for years because of their bossiness & control-freakery, I'm still getting to grips with the alien "Apple-ness" of it (aka Apple-Rage!) :-). But despite that, I adore the iPad itself, which is saying something really enormous indeed!

                      The type of stylus you use is also involved in the sensitivity. I use the Adonit JotPro for artwork — personally, I find fingers or a rubber-tipped stylus just isn't acceptable for any level of accuracy in fine artwork, especially when drawing with a 1-pixel pen or pencil, say.

                      The JotPro is the one that looks very odd: it has a biro-like point but with a circular see-through plastic disc attached, which swivels as you move it around. It works very well apart from just one thing—that super-glossy feel of the iPad3 screen, which is such a big selling point & the thing everyone else loves— is a drawback for art.

                      I wanted a slight tooth on the surface, so I tried cutting down an A4 sheet of thin, transparent acetate and attaching it to the front of the iPad with tiny bits of sellotape. This was just a test to see if it made any difference to both the feel with artwork or all the other manipulations you need to do with touch, whether with fingers or rubber-tip stylus.

                      Well, it works brilliantly for both, no problem. The difference with the tooth is subtle but enough to be a good solution. It isn't as robust as the original screen surface of course, but if or when it wears enough to become a problem, it can be easily replaced for hardly any cost.

                      The new Adonit JotTouch stylus, due out any day, promises a completely different, state of the art level of sensitivity technology. The stylus design and the app software technologies seem to be driving each other forward...it's an exciting time. I will certainly get the Touch as soon as it arrives, though it's a lot more expensive that the JotPro. Bread & scrape only for a bit is do-able :-)

                      Please note: I don't have any involvement with any stylus company—this is what I've discovered and is my opinion, after trying out  lots of tools for myself.

                      I use Procreate app for preference, which gives a whole load of brush-building, levels & many other features, though I also have Brushes and a lot of others. which are good at doing different things.

                      Hope this might be useful info for any other MSer thinking of iPad art.

                      Ann

                      ..............................................................................
                      On 30/06/2012 09:10, Nick Mellersh wrote:
                       
                      No.  But it is simulated in some apps by the speed of the stroke.  The Brushes ap I know does this.  Others too probably.
                      Nick Mellersh




                    • Nick Mellersh
                      My wife Jeanie finds her finger just as good as a stylus, and harder to lose.  We have a Wacom Bamboo stylus which is nice but for her ipad work (mostly
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 1, 2012
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                        My wife Jeanie finds her finger just as good as a stylus, and harder to lose.  We have a Wacom Bamboo stylus which is nice but for her ipad work (mostly outdoor sketching) she finds a finger just as good and probably better.

                        You can see her work at http://ipadpainting-jeanie.blogspot.co.uk/ The more recent posts are about the sculpture she is currently carving but if you go back a post or three there is lots of iPad work.

                        Nick


                        From: Ann Norman <ann@...>
                        To: painterworld@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sunday, 1 July 2012, 17:59
                        Subject: Re: [painterworld] iPad art (long post)

                         

                        As a lifetime Windows user, I now have had an iPad for a few weeks. After avoiding Apple for years because of their bossiness & control-freakery, I'm still getting to grips with the alien "Apple-ness" of it (aka Apple-Rage!) :-). But despite that, I adore the iPad itself, which is saying something really enormous indeed!

                        The type of stylus you use is also involved in the sensitivity. I use the Adonit JotPro for artwork — personally, I find fingers or a rubber-tipped stylus just isn't acceptable for any level of accuracy in fine artwork, especially when drawing with a 1-pixel pen or pencil, say.

                        The JotPro is the one that looks very odd: it has a biro-like point but with a circular see-through plastic disc attached, which swivels as you move it around. It works very well apart from just one thing—that super-glossy feel of the iPad3 screen, which is such a big selling point & the thing everyone else loves— is a drawback for art.

                        I wanted a slight tooth on the surface, so I tried cutting down an A4 sheet of thin, transparent acetate and attaching it to the front of the iPad with tiny bits of sellotape. This was just a test to see if it made any difference to both the feel with artwork or all the other manipulations you need to do with touch, whether with fingers or rubber-tip stylus.

                        Well, it works brilliantly for both, no problem. The difference with the tooth is subtle but enough to be a good solution. It isn't as robust as the original screen surface of course, but if or when it wears enough to become a problem, it can be easily replaced for hardly any cost.

                        The new Adonit JotTouch stylus, due out any day, promises a completely different, state of the art level of sensitivity technology. The stylus design and the app software technologies seem to be driving each other forward...it's an exciting time. I will certainly get the Touch as soon as it arrives, though it's a lot more expensive that the JotPro. Bread & scrape only for a bit is do-able :-)

                        Please note: I don't have any involvement with any stylus company—this is what I've discovered and is my opinion, after trying out  lots of tools for myself.

                        I use Procreate app for preference, which gives a whole load of brush-building, levels & many other features, though I also have Brushes and a lot of others. which are good at doing different things.

                        Hope this might be useful info for any other MSer thinking of iPad art.

                        Ann
                      • Ann Norman
                        As always, horses for courses. Ann
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 1, 2012
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                          As always, horses for courses.

                          Ann


                          On 01/07/2012 20:18, Nick Mellersh wrote:
                           
                          My wife Jeanie finds her finger just as good as a stylus, and harder to lose.  We have a Wacom Bamboo stylus which is nice but for her ipad work (mostly outdoor sketching) she finds a finger just as good and probably better.

                          You can see her work at http://ipadpainting-jeanie.blogspot.co.uk/ The more recent posts are about the sculpture she is currently carving but if you go back a post or three there is lots of iPad work.

                          Nick




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