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Re: [ov-10fans] Another Bronco question - the lights on the front nosegear strut

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  • John Greenewald
    The 3 lights and devise is the Angle of Attack signal light.  The flagman on a Aircraft Carrier is looking for the landing gears all down, and  the angle of
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 7, 2013
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      The 3 lights and devise is the Angle of Attack signal light.  The flagman on a Aircraft Carrier is looking for the landing gears all down, and  the angle of attack light color, for the proper touch down angle. The pilot is watching the flagman on approach for a wave off, I am not sure how he gets the signal to correct the angle of attack, but probably a flag signal. But that was in the 60 and 70's, not sure what they do nowadays.   Every carrier  landing aircraft has them, I know the A-4 also had them.  I recall that as a plane captain, who signals the pilot on and off the flight line with hand signals, one thing we check after the Jets are started and we would go through the routine of checks and hand signals.  We would check the angle of attack lights to be working, by depressing a rod on the top of it, to see if the lights all work, and signal the pilot they were working. They were just an electrical box with 3 lights.  Memory is fading, but I think we confirmed all 3 colors lite up, by a signal of 3 fingers and touching your nose with them.  

      I have had to serve duty doing "Wheels Watch" at the runway approach, and had to flag anyone off who did not have wheels down.  As luck would have it, I got to do it in the middle of August, in Yuma Arizona when it was usually 120 degrees.  All you had to do was stand up and hold 2 flags straight out your sides, and if you didn't see all wheels down, you better wave those flags like a madman, and scream at the top of your lungs, even if nobody could hear you.  About every 4 hours the crash crew truck would drive out to see if you were dead from the heat.  They had a little hut, but it was locked up tight, and you got a chair to shift around to the shady side of the hut. In that temperature you would die in about 5-10 inside that hut.   They gave you a 5 gallon water dispenser, and all the salt pills you could take.  The heat was brutal, but we got used to the flight lines in summer in Yuma.  

                                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                      


      From: jwhangen <jwhangen@...>
      To: ov-10fans@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 6:47 PM
      Subject: [ov-10fans] Another Bronco question - the lights on the front nosegear strut

       
      Hi Everyone,
      Thank you very much for all the info on the RBF tags on the ejection seats!

      Another quick question if I may – in some photos of OV-10 nose gear, I've noticed a small assembly attached to the strut with three color lights. What are those lights for? Is that a fairly standard thing for OV-10As? Looks to me like it's green/orange/red from left to right. Just trying to figure out if I should include these lights on my OV-10A model (VMO-2 from circa 1975) – here's a photo of the lights:

      http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v168/jwhangen/nosegeartop.png

      Thank you!
      John



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