Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

[Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] sliding genioplasty

Expand Messages
  • Robert
    Dennis, I had severe sleep apnea with an AHI of 66 with desaturations down to the high 70s. I didn t know it, but had an extremely narrow airway, was getting
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 1, 2012
      Dennis,

      I had severe sleep apnea with an AHI of 66 with desaturations down to the high 70s. I didn't know it, but had an extremely narrow airway, was getting the effective sleep of 15% of a normal human, and my heart was under a tremendous strain keeping me alive every night. The surgery was to widen that airway and completely cured my sleep apnea (AHI now 5).

      My airway went from this:

      http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_7gcCdV1-mi8/SxlhPSp_dwI/AAAAAAAACtk/bSd1zzjcgdo/s320/newairway.jpg

      To this:

      http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_7gcCdV1-mi8/SxlhPSp_dwI/AAAAAAAACtk/bSd1zzjcgdo/s320/newairway.jpg

      If you want to read about all the gory details, go to http://robsjaws.blogspot.com

      My doctor chose to use a tight configuration of five rubber bands
      setup in a pattern over my braces for six weeks. The result is, it is
      just like you're wired 23 hours and 50 minutes of the day, but
      for a brief respite where you get to take the rubber bands off, and
      brush your teeth with a small pediatric toothbrush, swish with peridex antibiotic rinse, and put them back on.

      I also had the liquid diet during that time as well. Its weird though, I have heard varying approaches on this board of how surgeons prescribe to keep jaw stable during the bone setting process. Some doctors seem less strict than mine, use a couple loose rubber bands, others use arch wires, so discuss with your doctor. I had a loss in fixation a few hours after my first surgery and the doctor had to go back in a week later to fix my upper jaw that moved. This could be why he chose the tight banding.

      You most definitely need braces. For any doctor that tells you that
      you don't or can use invisalign, run far far away from them. Things
      move after this surgery as bones set and heal. Everything was spot
      on after my surgery, then my midline moved to the right a few millimeters and I started to have edge to edge contact. Orthodontists will then adjust your wires and do various elastic patters to get everything back in place. You might be in braces for a few years. I was for two years eight months. Anything is better than a life of C-pap though.

      Rob

      --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, Amy Colony <acolony01@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am scheduled to have the surgery in late Jan. or early Feb.  I will not be required to have my jaw wired shut during healing.  It's my understanding that surgeons now use a configuration of rubberbands to keep things stationary while the bones heal.  However, I do have a highly annoying set of hardware (braces) on my teeth - put on last week - that I'm stuck with until around 6 mo. after surgery.  But I'll get over it.  ; ) 
      >  
      > My bite is pretty good (after corrective appliances worn in adolescence for that purpose) and my teeth are straight so I am not trying to correct any of those issues.  Rather, I'm told I have to wear these in order to get my teeth aligned right for surgery and after to keep the teeth from moving in ways they shouldn't.
      >  
      > Amy
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Dennis Howard <dennishowardtx@...>
      > To: orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2012 7:27 AM
      > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] Re: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] sliding genioplasty
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      > Robert,
      >
      > I joined this group because I have sleep apnea, have a receding chin (my
      > wife insists that I wear a goatee to "hide" the defect - what's with that?)
      > and I am considering having the orthognathic surgery next spring.
      >
      > I'm new to this group, but looking at your before/after pictures, your
      > condition did not seem that extreme. Was your jaw alignment surgery done
      > to correct only the sleep apnea, or were there other factors that led to
      > your decision to have the surgery?
      > I heard somewhere that your jaws need to be wired shut for several weeks;
      > is that true? I've seen pictures of braces to realign the teeth after
      > everything is shifted around, but I'm not looking forward to having my jaws
      > wired shut.
      >
      > Dennis
      > On Tue, Oct 30, 2012 at 8:38 PM, Robert <mailto:cannondalerob%40gmail.com> wrote:
      >
      > > If your chin had receded like mine to the point where your airway is no
      > > longer kept open when you sleep, you might have sleep apnea. I don't want
      > > to freak you out or make you project you have some medical condition, but
      > > people with weak recessed chins like mine tend to have this condition. The
      > > surgery is generally covered by insurance then, but as always, it depends
      > > on how cheap your employer is and what insurance company/plan it was.
      > >
      > >
      > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7gcCdV1-mi8/SyQaV8PJk6I/AAAAAAAACt0/ILmGgXQoFD0/s1600/oldandnew.jpg
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Robert
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In mailto:orthognathicsurgerysupport%40yahoogroups.com, Nancy Buckman
      > > <nebuckman@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Call whomever you want, and ask for an appointment. You can go anywhere,
      > > > to anyone. If your insurance requires a referral for payment, then you
      > > > will need a referral. You could always change orthodontists. If you are
      > > > near a dental school, that is a good place to start. They aren't likely
      > > to
      > > > turn you away just because you have seen someone else.
      > > >
      > > > Nancy
      > > >
      > > > On Wed, Oct 10, 2012 at 12:19 AM, KARISA KELLY <karisab@>wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > **
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Alex,THE ONLY person I could EVER recommend to anyone would be to see
      > > Dr.
      > > > > Arnett in Santa Barbara. You have to see him, he is the most
      > > knowledgeable
      > > > > in his field and he won't steer you wrong. There are too many aspects
      > > to
      > > > > this surgery and you have to go the best. I live in OC and it was
      > > worth the
      > > > > time and the drive. Get another opinion! Make it Arnett's.good luck!K
      > > > > --- On Mon, 10/8/12, Alex <alexdang94@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > From: Alex <alexdang94@>
      > > > > Subject: [Orthognathic Surgery Support ] sliding genioplasty
      > > > > To: mailto:orthognathicsurgerysupport%40yahoogroups.com
      > > > > Date: Monday, October 8, 2012, 6:16 PM
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Everyone,
      > > > >
      > > > > I have a huge receding chin problem where I can't close my mouth
      > > properly
      > > > > when at rest.I did a lot of research on the problem and seems like
      > > > > performing a sliding genioplasty would solve the problem.
      > > > >
      > > > > I want to seek an maxillofacial surgeon for an advice but my
      > > orthodontist
      > > > > is very conservative. He only gave me option of filling my teeth and
      > > make
      > > > > it narrower for braces . Does anyone have similar problem before?
      > > > >
      > > > > How did you get a referral to see a maxillofacial surgeon since this is
      > > > > not a bite nor jaw related problem.
      > > > >
      > > > > Does maxillofacial surgeon only see patients who has functional
      > > problem?
      > > > >
      > > > > I live in norCal and wonder if I can see Dr. Felice O'Ryan in oakland
      > > > > kaiser without a referral.
      > > > >
      > > > > Thank you!
      > > > >
      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > > *Nancy Buckman
      > > > AACC Symphony Orchestra
      > > > Opera AACC
      > > > Early Music Society of Northern MD
      > > > nebuckman@*
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • ceast36532
      Hi, What s involved depends on what you need, and how your surgeon prefers his or her patients to be treated. (My surgeon -- an Oral and Maxillofacial
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 12, 2012
        Hi,

        What's involved depends on what you need, and how your surgeon prefers his or her patients to be treated. (My surgeon -- an Oral and Maxillofacial specialist -- told me in 2002 that he hadn't wired anyone shut for 10 or so years.)

        I needed braces to realign the teeth in general (and I had worn them as a child, back in the 1950s) and to position the teeth properly for the surgery, as well as afterward, to finish up, with the aid of lots of elastics! I would have needed the orthodontia to fix my "destructive bite," which was leading to destruction of my teeth through imbalanced pressures of one sort and another. I hadn't ever considered such, figuring that I'd tended to all that "way back when."

        I had -- and still have, to some extent -- a recessive chin, but that wasn't why I did everything. I wanted to keep my "original equipment" in my mouth, as I've never found any man-made equipment that can come close to replacing the original, if there is any choice involved!

        Cammie



        --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Howard <dennishowardtx@...> wrote:
        >
        > Robert,
        >
        > I joined this group because I have sleep apnea, have a receding chin (my
        > wife insists that I wear a goatee to "hide" the defect - what's with that?)
        > and I am considering having the orthognathic surgery next spring.
        >
        > I'm new to this group, but looking at your before/after pictures, your
        > condition did not seem that extreme. Was your jaw alignment surgery done
        > to correct only the sleep apnea, or were there other factors that led to
        > your decision to have the surgery?
        > I heard somewhere that your jaws need to be wired shut for several weeks;
        > is that true? I've seen pictures of braces to realign the teeth after
        > everything is shifted around, but I'm not looking forward to having my jaws
        > wired shut.
        >
        > Dennis
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.