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Re: Spam? (also an insurance ?)

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  • Elisann
    I will be afraid to brush. I ll be too worried I will move something out of place since I am having upper jaw surgery too. I am so nervous about all this.
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 1 10:28 AM
      I will be afraid to brush. I'll be too worried I will move something out of place since I am having upper jaw surgery too. I am so nervous about all this. Following your recovery has made it all very real for me. I know that I too will be experiencing, if not the same things, very similar things. Not that your recovery was complicated it's just the normal things to expect which seem to be enough. I can't imagine having complications.

      How have you adjusted to your appearance? I am sure the more you heal and the more the swelling goes down the more you start to see what you will look like. I am nervous about that as well. I hope I don't regret this. Sorry for all the questions, but to have someone go through this now is helpful and is good to get your feedback while your going through it.

      --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@...> wrote:
      >
      > Brushing teeth is a progression which is why you have the prescription mouthwash to use at first. At first, all I could brush were the front teeth in the middle only and use the mouthwash (or maybe even just the mouthwash at first). After they took the rubber bands off at a week I could gradually brush all the front of my teeth even in the back. I can't open my mouth enough to brush the tops of the molars or behind the teeth yet, though. Last time I saw my doctor, he said the incisions were healing well, but otherwise I haven't really paid much attention to them. He also said I was doing a good job keeping my mouth clean (although it certainly doesn't feel like it). My upper palate is a little dull feeling (slightly numb). It's hard to describe, but at first, I was a little challenged with mouth and tongue movements. Trying to swish the mouthwash around was hard to do. Getting the food from the front of the mouth to the back was sometimes a challenge (depending on the consistency). I guess you can sort of talk pretty soon (my husband said I was bossing the hospital staff around fairly soon after the surgery)...it's just you don't feel like it...and it might be somewhat unintelligible at first. I used the whiteboard a lot at first and then it gradually faded out of use. It's moderately easy to talk now (over 2 weeks later) but I still get tired or dread it a little. But I wonder if at this point an unobservent stranger would notice I'd had surgery unless I told them. I still have some achiness/pain (especially if I talk a lot), but I guess it gets a little better every day.
      >
      > KC
      >
      > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Yeah you need to take it easy for a while. Your body has a lot of healing to do.
      > >
      > > How is brushing your teeth and how does your mouth feel with all the incisions and stitches? I am surprised your talking already...thats great and I am sure good for it.
      > >
      > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I feel pretty good. Only slight swelling left, and my most of my chin is still partially numb. I'm anxious to see my doctors again since they're on vacation until early next week because I want to know how they think I'm doing. Oh, but I do have a feeling that if I did over exert myself, I might find myself not fully recovered yet. I saw that with the family Christmas activities. It left me a little nauseous for a spell from moving around more and my mouth was more sore from all the talking by the end of the night.
      > > >
      > > > KC
      > > >
      > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Yeah thanks, me too! What a horrible time for something like this to happen!
      > > > >
      > > > > How have you been feeling? Is your recovery getting better?
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > How horrible. I hope you can get it figured out quickly, and it works out.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > KC
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > He said if he has to he will go to the HR department. The thing is I wasn't dropped, my husband didn't follow the instructions close enough and inadvertently didn't add me. I have been with my husbands insurance for 10 years. Also I am on everything else, vision, dental, etc...just not medical. They should see that it was a mistake....I hope.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > That is kind of weird about the spam. And my messages don't seem to be going through at times, but I think that's just because I've been trying to reply on my phone, and maybe the phone is messing up.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Do you have your own insurance you can switch to? I think being dropped from an insurance sometimes can qualify you to join your own insurance within 30 days. Usually, I think 30 days is the time frame after the effective date of the event (marriage, birth, being dropped from insurance, etc). Of course, I don't know if they sometimes have that nasty evidence of insurability clause in some of those cases (where they review your medical history and might throw in a pre-existing clause). I think it is usually final once the open enrollment is over, though. Can you husband inquire with his HR, though? If there are no other options, maybe you can look into COBRA?
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > KC
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > I don't need spam from this group. I mean, don't approve the posts before they publish them?
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > My question about insurance: my husband didn't carefully read the instructions for the open enrollment for our insurance next year and he didn't add me on by mistake. I am on everything else just not the medical. Has this happened to anyone before and how will this effect my coverage? I am so upset and stressed out now thanks to him not being careful. I worry they won't pay for it now.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • keppers79
      I understand; I was afraid to brush at first, too. That is why I just started with the middle of the front teeth. I think you can ask your doctor as you go
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 1 5:06 PM
        I understand; I was afraid to brush at first, too. That is why I just started with the middle of the front teeth. I think you can ask your doctor as you go along what it is safe to do, too. (It was hard to remember everything aforehand so that is what I do sometimes--ask if I can now do such and such at a particular appointment).

        Yes, it's hard to know what to expect. I had heard such horror stories and seen my friend have such a hard time, that I expected the worse. I feel like so far it has gone better than expected, but there is still so much more of the recovery left that I know I'm not completely out of danger of a complication.

        Yes, I think so far I'm adjusting to my new appearance. It really doesn't seem that different from before, but perhaps time will tell. I had an open bite and a tilted bottom jaw, so it just seems like it makes my face more of what it should be, but still really I don't see a large change. I don't think my family and friends do either; one said the change is subtle. There is possibly still some slight swelling, but I think I can get a good sense. Perhaps, also, my doctor tried not to make a huge change in the appearance since he knew my reasons for the surgery were so little based on appearance. We went over my goals for the surgery a number of times in the preparation process so he knew what I wanted. It really is weird that I don't look so much different, though, since the movement was quite dramatic I think. I had such a huge open bite.

        KC

        --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@...> wrote:
        >
        > I will be afraid to brush. I'll be too worried I will move something out of place since I am having upper jaw surgery too. I am so nervous about all this. Following your recovery has made it all very real for me. I know that I too will be experiencing, if not the same things, very similar things. Not that your recovery was complicated it's just the normal things to expect which seem to be enough. I can't imagine having complications.
        >
        > How have you adjusted to your appearance? I am sure the more you heal and the more the swelling goes down the more you start to see what you will look like. I am nervous about that as well. I hope I don't regret this. Sorry for all the questions, but to have someone go through this now is helpful and is good to get your feedback while your going through it.
        >
        > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Brushing teeth is a progression which is why you have the prescription mouthwash to use at first. At first, all I could brush were the front teeth in the middle only and use the mouthwash (or maybe even just the mouthwash at first). After they took the rubber bands off at a week I could gradually brush all the front of my teeth even in the back. I can't open my mouth enough to brush the tops of the molars or behind the teeth yet, though. Last time I saw my doctor, he said the incisions were healing well, but otherwise I haven't really paid much attention to them. He also said I was doing a good job keeping my mouth clean (although it certainly doesn't feel like it). My upper palate is a little dull feeling (slightly numb). It's hard to describe, but at first, I was a little challenged with mouth and tongue movements. Trying to swish the mouthwash around was hard to do. Getting the food from the front of the mouth to the back was sometimes a challenge (depending on the consistency). I guess you can sort of talk pretty soon (my husband said I was bossing the hospital staff around fairly soon after the surgery)...it's just you don't feel like it...and it might be somewhat unintelligible at first. I used the whiteboard a lot at first and then it gradually faded out of use. It's moderately easy to talk now (over 2 weeks later) but I still get tired or dread it a little. But I wonder if at this point an unobservent stranger would notice I'd had surgery unless I told them. I still have some achiness/pain (especially if I talk a lot), but I guess it gets a little better every day.
        > >
        > > KC
        > >
        > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yeah you need to take it easy for a while. Your body has a lot of healing to do.
        > > >
        > > > How is brushing your teeth and how does your mouth feel with all the incisions and stitches? I am surprised your talking already...thats great and I am sure good for it.
        > > >
        > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > I feel pretty good. Only slight swelling left, and my most of my chin is still partially numb. I'm anxious to see my doctors again since they're on vacation until early next week because I want to know how they think I'm doing. Oh, but I do have a feeling that if I did over exert myself, I might find myself not fully recovered yet. I saw that with the family Christmas activities. It left me a little nauseous for a spell from moving around more and my mouth was more sore from all the talking by the end of the night.
        > > > >
        > > > > KC
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Yeah thanks, me too! What a horrible time for something like this to happen!
        > > > > >
        > > > > > How have you been feeling? Is your recovery getting better?
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > How horrible. I hope you can get it figured out quickly, and it works out.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > KC
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > He said if he has to he will go to the HR department. The thing is I wasn't dropped, my husband didn't follow the instructions close enough and inadvertently didn't add me. I have been with my husbands insurance for 10 years. Also I am on everything else, vision, dental, etc...just not medical. They should see that it was a mistake....I hope.
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > That is kind of weird about the spam. And my messages don't seem to be going through at times, but I think that's just because I've been trying to reply on my phone, and maybe the phone is messing up.
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > Do you have your own insurance you can switch to? I think being dropped from an insurance sometimes can qualify you to join your own insurance within 30 days. Usually, I think 30 days is the time frame after the effective date of the event (marriage, birth, being dropped from insurance, etc). Of course, I don't know if they sometimes have that nasty evidence of insurability clause in some of those cases (where they review your medical history and might throw in a pre-existing clause). I think it is usually final once the open enrollment is over, though. Can you husband inquire with his HR, though? If there are no other options, maybe you can look into COBRA?
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > KC
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > I don't need spam from this group. I mean, don't approve the posts before they publish them?
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > My question about insurance: my husband didn't carefully read the instructions for the open enrollment for our insurance next year and he didn't add me on by mistake. I am on everything else just not the medical. Has this happened to anyone before and how will this effect my coverage? I am so upset and stressed out now thanks to him not being careful. I worry they won't pay for it now.
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • ceast36532
        You probably don t want to stress out a lot over brushing after surgery. I wasn t wired, or even banded. I do have a mouth that is, and has ever been, a plaque
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 4 2:22 PM
          You probably don't want to stress out a lot over brushing after surgery.
          I wasn't wired, or even banded. I do have a mouth that is, and has ever been, a plaque factory, Alas.
          But I got the distinct impression from my docs that they were telling me to do the best I could and not to panic.
          Yep, if you are asked to use a special mouthwash, do it. My ortho and my general dentist also like for me to use topical fluoride appliciations.

          You will find, I think, that a really soft, tiny little brush designed for infants can be helpful. Heaven knows you don't want to go in there anywhere near incisions or stitches with any tool or motion that's rough or tough. Just think gentle motions, and do the best you can! This period won't go on forever -- it's just while things are healing and vulnerable, so let things be.

          Yes, if you have a splint wired in, it's likely to get nasty. Should you develop thrush, that will also be nasty -- but your dentist can probably prescribe something to help with the thrush. (When time came for removal of my splint, one dental assistant said to the other, whom she was teaching, "All I can suggest is that you hold your breath." It had been wired in for seven weeks.) I did try to make it up to them by giving it, and my mouth, a good scrubbing and rinse with mouthwash, after it was removed.

          At some point, your surgeon may let you use a Water-Pik post op. DO NOT TRY THIS BEFORE THE SURGEON SAYS IT'S OK. You can destroy stitches, if you do, and that's not a good outcome.

          Mainly, though, just try not to stress about it. Nobody likes to have a mouthful of gunk -- but nobody (I've ever met, anyhow) likes to have a mouthful of braces, either, nor a splint wired in, except for what they can accomplish.

          Good wishes to all. Stay in touch with your docs, ask questions about anything that worries you, and do what you're told. They know what to advise, and given that most of them are kind and expert, will give you good advice. And do ask, before the surgery, where to call post-op, even if they're on vacation, for help if you need it. It's unlikely that you will, but just in case!

          Cammie

          --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@...> wrote:
          >
          > I understand; I was afraid to brush at first, too. That is why I just started with the middle of the front teeth. I think you can ask your doctor as you go along what it is safe to do, too. (It was hard to remember everything aforehand so that is what I do sometimes--ask if I can now do such and such at a particular appointment).
          >
          > Yes, it's hard to know what to expect. I had heard such horror stories and seen my friend have such a hard time, that I expected the worse. I feel like so far it has gone better than expected, but there is still so much more of the recovery left that I know I'm not completely out of danger of a complication.
          >
          > Yes, I think so far I'm adjusting to my new appearance. It really doesn't seem that different from before, but perhaps time will tell. I had an open bite and a tilted bottom jaw, so it just seems like it makes my face more of what it should be, but still really I don't see a large change. I don't think my family and friends do either; one said the change is subtle. There is possibly still some slight swelling, but I think I can get a good sense. Perhaps, also, my doctor tried not to make a huge change in the appearance since he knew my reasons for the surgery were so little based on appearance. We went over my goals for the surgery a number of times in the preparation process so he knew what I wanted. It really is weird that I don't look so much different, though, since the movement was quite dramatic I think. I had such a huge open bite.
          >
          > KC
          >
          > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I will be afraid to brush. I'll be too worried I will move something out of place since I am having upper jaw surgery too. I am so nervous about all this. Following your recovery has made it all very real for me. I know that I too will be experiencing, if not the same things, very similar things. Not that your recovery was complicated it's just the normal things to expect which seem to be enough. I can't imagine having complications.
          > >
          > > How have you adjusted to your appearance? I am sure the more you heal and the more the swelling goes down the more you start to see what you will look like. I am nervous about that as well. I hope I don't regret this. Sorry for all the questions, but to have someone go through this now is helpful and is good to get your feedback while your going through it.
          > >
          > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Brushing teeth is a progression which is why you have the prescription mouthwash to use at first. At first, all I could brush were the front teeth in the middle only and use the mouthwash (or maybe even just the mouthwash at first). After they took the rubber bands off at a week I could gradually brush all the front of my teeth even in the back. I can't open my mouth enough to brush the tops of the molars or behind the teeth yet, though. Last time I saw my doctor, he said the incisions were healing well, but otherwise I haven't really paid much attention to them. He also said I was doing a good job keeping my mouth clean (although it certainly doesn't feel like it). My upper palate is a little dull feeling (slightly numb). It's hard to describe, but at first, I was a little challenged with mouth and tongue movements. Trying to swish the mouthwash around was hard to do. Getting the food from the front of the mouth to the back was sometimes a challenge (depending on the consistency). I guess you can sort of talk pretty soon (my husband said I was bossing the hospital staff around fairly soon after the surgery)...it's just you don't feel like it...and it might be somewhat unintelligible at first. I used the whiteboard a lot at first and then it gradually faded out of use. It's moderately easy to talk now (over 2 weeks later) but I still get tired or dread it a little. But I wonder if at this point an unobservent stranger would notice I'd had surgery unless I told them. I still have some achiness/pain (especially if I talk a lot), but I guess it gets a little better every day.
          > > >
          > > > KC
          > > >
          > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Yeah you need to take it easy for a while. Your body has a lot of healing to do.
          > > > >
          > > > > How is brushing your teeth and how does your mouth feel with all the incisions and stitches? I am surprised your talking already...thats great and I am sure good for it.
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > I feel pretty good. Only slight swelling left, and my most of my chin is still partially numb. I'm anxious to see my doctors again since they're on vacation until early next week because I want to know how they think I'm doing. Oh, but I do have a feeling that if I did over exert myself, I might find myself not fully recovered yet. I saw that with the family Christmas activities. It left me a little nauseous for a spell from moving around more and my mouth was more sore from all the talking by the end of the night.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > KC
          > > > > >
          > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > Yeah thanks, me too! What a horrible time for something like this to happen!
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > How have you been feeling? Is your recovery getting better?
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > How horrible. I hope you can get it figured out quickly, and it works out.
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > KC
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > He said if he has to he will go to the HR department. The thing is I wasn't dropped, my husband didn't follow the instructions close enough and inadvertently didn't add me. I have been with my husbands insurance for 10 years. Also I am on everything else, vision, dental, etc...just not medical. They should see that it was a mistake....I hope.
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > That is kind of weird about the spam. And my messages don't seem to be going through at times, but I think that's just because I've been trying to reply on my phone, and maybe the phone is messing up.
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > Do you have your own insurance you can switch to? I think being dropped from an insurance sometimes can qualify you to join your own insurance within 30 days. Usually, I think 30 days is the time frame after the effective date of the event (marriage, birth, being dropped from insurance, etc). Of course, I don't know if they sometimes have that nasty evidence of insurability clause in some of those cases (where they review your medical history and might throw in a pre-existing clause). I think it is usually final once the open enrollment is over, though. Can you husband inquire with his HR, though? If there are no other options, maybe you can look into COBRA?
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > KC
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
          > > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > > I don't need spam from this group. I mean, don't approve the posts before they publish them?
          > > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > > My question about insurance: my husband didn't carefully read the instructions for the open enrollment for our insurance next year and he didn't add me on by mistake. I am on everything else just not the medical. Has this happened to anyone before and how will this effect my coverage? I am so upset and stressed out now thanks to him not being careful. I worry they won't pay for it now.
          > > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • keppers79
          Cammie, This is exactly along the lines of what my surgeon has told me. I complained early on about not being able to brush very well because of some rubber
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 4 10:17 PM
            Cammie,

            This is exactly along the lines of what my surgeon has told me. I complained early on about not being able to brush very well because of some rubber bands in place, and he said, that is the least of your worries. I can't remember what the worries were at the time, but maybe that was after I had thrown up my nausea medicine and really needed to get a different one that actually worked. Luckily we did, and that was the worst the nausea got (although I still get it from time to time if I do too much).

            Then, the other day, I complained that I still couldn't brush as I liked, and he said, "Your teeth are clean...just not up to YOUR specs." Then, one time I brought up flossing, and we both agreed I probably couldn't physically do it yet (because of mouth opening), but again, he stressed that I was doing fine in keeping my mouth clean.

            I'm with you Cammie, though. I do worry because I am a plaque factory, too, and usually go every 4 months to the dentist, and no matter how much I floss/brush, from time to time, I still get "the lecture" from the hygenist. She looked very worried when I explained that I wouldn't be able to brush my teeth as much or as well after the surgery. My surgeon also said I probably won't even be able to go back to the dentist for a while...I think he said 8 or 9 months after surgery or something? Gees... Well, I guess I just need to trust him as I have to trust him in many things in this ordeal, that when he says I'm doing okay on keeping my mouth clean, I am. I guess that's why it's important to pick out a surgeon you know you can trust.

            I agree with you about the small brushes. For some reason, I've gravitated towards the kids brushes for a while now. I feel like they're more gentle, and I have more control, and they fit better on my teeth with the braces. I don't know if it's wise, but I've also been using those little brushes meant for going between braces or teeth to reach back to places where a toothbrush won't fit yet.

            Sheesh, Cammie, I'm glad I didn't have a splint (at least that kind).

            KC

            --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@...> wrote:
            >
            > You probably don't want to stress out a lot over brushing after surgery.
            > I wasn't wired, or even banded. I do have a mouth that is, and has ever been, a plaque factory, Alas.
            > But I got the distinct impression from my docs that they were telling me to do the best I could and not to panic.
            > Yep, if you are asked to use a special mouthwash, do it. My ortho and my general dentist also like for me to use topical fluoride appliciations.
            >
            > You will find, I think, that a really soft, tiny little brush designed for infants can be helpful. Heaven knows you don't want to go in there anywhere near incisions or stitches with any tool or motion that's rough or tough. Just think gentle motions, and do the best you can! This period won't go on forever -- it's just while things are healing and vulnerable, so let things be.
            >
            > Yes, if you have a splint wired in, it's likely to get nasty. Should you develop thrush, that will also be nasty -- but your dentist can probably prescribe something to help with the thrush. (When time came for removal of my splint, one dental assistant said to the other, whom she was teaching, "All I can suggest is that you hold your breath." It had been wired in for seven weeks.) I did try to make it up to them by giving it, and my mouth, a good scrubbing and rinse with mouthwash, after it was removed.
            >
            > At some point, your surgeon may let you use a Water-Pik post op. DO NOT TRY THIS BEFORE THE SURGEON SAYS IT'S OK. You can destroy stitches, if you do, and that's not a good outcome.
            >
            > Mainly, though, just try not to stress about it. Nobody likes to have a mouthful of gunk -- but nobody (I've ever met, anyhow) likes to have a mouthful of braces, either, nor a splint wired in, except for what they can accomplish.
            >
            > Good wishes to all. Stay in touch with your docs, ask questions about anything that worries you, and do what you're told. They know what to advise, and given that most of them are kind and expert, will give you good advice. And do ask, before the surgery, where to call post-op, even if they're on vacation, for help if you need it. It's unlikely that you will, but just in case!
            >
            > Cammie
            >
            > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I understand; I was afraid to brush at first, too. That is why I just started with the middle of the front teeth. I think you can ask your doctor as you go along what it is safe to do, too. (It was hard to remember everything aforehand so that is what I do sometimes--ask if I can now do such and such at a particular appointment).
            > >
            > > Yes, it's hard to know what to expect. I had heard such horror stories and seen my friend have such a hard time, that I expected the worse. I feel like so far it has gone better than expected, but there is still so much more of the recovery left that I know I'm not completely out of danger of a complication.
            > >
            > > Yes, I think so far I'm adjusting to my new appearance. It really doesn't seem that different from before, but perhaps time will tell. I had an open bite and a tilted bottom jaw, so it just seems like it makes my face more of what it should be, but still really I don't see a large change. I don't think my family and friends do either; one said the change is subtle. There is possibly still some slight swelling, but I think I can get a good sense. Perhaps, also, my doctor tried not to make a huge change in the appearance since he knew my reasons for the surgery were so little based on appearance. We went over my goals for the surgery a number of times in the preparation process so he knew what I wanted. It really is weird that I don't look so much different, though, since the movement was quite dramatic I think. I had such a huge open bite.
            > >
            > > KC
            > >
            > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I will be afraid to brush. I'll be too worried I will move something out of place since I am having upper jaw surgery too. I am so nervous about all this. Following your recovery has made it all very real for me. I know that I too will be experiencing, if not the same things, very similar things. Not that your recovery was complicated it's just the normal things to expect which seem to be enough. I can't imagine having complications.
            > > >
            > > > How have you adjusted to your appearance? I am sure the more you heal and the more the swelling goes down the more you start to see what you will look like. I am nervous about that as well. I hope I don't regret this. Sorry for all the questions, but to have someone go through this now is helpful and is good to get your feedback while your going through it.
            > > >
            > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Brushing teeth is a progression which is why you have the prescription mouthwash to use at first. At first, all I could brush were the front teeth in the middle only and use the mouthwash (or maybe even just the mouthwash at first). After they took the rubber bands off at a week I could gradually brush all the front of my teeth even in the back. I can't open my mouth enough to brush the tops of the molars or behind the teeth yet, though. Last time I saw my doctor, he said the incisions were healing well, but otherwise I haven't really paid much attention to them. He also said I was doing a good job keeping my mouth clean (although it certainly doesn't feel like it). My upper palate is a little dull feeling (slightly numb). It's hard to describe, but at first, I was a little challenged with mouth and tongue movements. Trying to swish the mouthwash around was hard to do. Getting the food from the front of the mouth to the back was sometimes a challenge (depending on the consistency). I guess you can sort of talk pretty soon (my husband said I was bossing the hospital staff around fairly soon after the surgery)...it's just you don't feel like it...and it might be somewhat unintelligible at first. I used the whiteboard a lot at first and then it gradually faded out of use. It's moderately easy to talk now (over 2 weeks later) but I still get tired or dread it a little. But I wonder if at this point an unobservent stranger would notice I'd had surgery unless I told them. I still have some achiness/pain (especially if I talk a lot), but I guess it gets a little better every day.
            > > > >
            > > > > KC
            > > > >
            > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
            > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > > > Yeah you need to take it easy for a while. Your body has a lot of healing to do.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > How is brushing your teeth and how does your mouth feel with all the incisions and stitches? I am surprised your talking already...thats great and I am sure good for it.
            > > > > >
            > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > I feel pretty good. Only slight swelling left, and my most of my chin is still partially numb. I'm anxious to see my doctors again since they're on vacation until early next week because I want to know how they think I'm doing. Oh, but I do have a feeling that if I did over exert myself, I might find myself not fully recovered yet. I saw that with the family Christmas activities. It left me a little nauseous for a spell from moving around more and my mouth was more sore from all the talking by the end of the night.
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > KC
            > > > > > >
            > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > Yeah thanks, me too! What a horrible time for something like this to happen!
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > How have you been feeling? Is your recovery getting better?
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > How horrible. I hope you can get it figured out quickly, and it works out.
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > KC
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > He said if he has to he will go to the HR department. The thing is I wasn't dropped, my husband didn't follow the instructions close enough and inadvertently didn't add me. I have been with my husbands insurance for 10 years. Also I am on everything else, vision, dental, etc...just not medical. They should see that it was a mistake....I hope.
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > That is kind of weird about the spam. And my messages don't seem to be going through at times, but I think that's just because I've been trying to reply on my phone, and maybe the phone is messing up.
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > Do you have your own insurance you can switch to? I think being dropped from an insurance sometimes can qualify you to join your own insurance within 30 days. Usually, I think 30 days is the time frame after the effective date of the event (marriage, birth, being dropped from insurance, etc). Of course, I don't know if they sometimes have that nasty evidence of insurability clause in some of those cases (where they review your medical history and might throw in a pre-existing clause). I think it is usually final once the open enrollment is over, though. Can you husband inquire with his HR, though? If there are no other options, maybe you can look into COBRA?
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > KC
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
            > > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > > I don't need spam from this group. I mean, don't approve the posts before they publish them?
            > > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > > > My question about insurance: my husband didn't carefully read the instructions for the open enrollment for our insurance next year and he didn't add me on by mistake. I am on everything else just not the medical. Has this happened to anyone before and how will this effect my coverage? I am so upset and stressed out now thanks to him not being careful. I worry they won't pay for it now.
            > > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > > >
            > > > > > > >
            > > > > > >
            > > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • ceast36532
            Hi, Kep -- glad to hear that you seem to be doing well and in good spirits! I think the thing is, all your oral caregivers are aware of what s going on, and of
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 7 3:54 PM
              Hi, Kep -- glad to hear that you seem to be doing well and in good spirits!

              I think the thing is, all your oral caregivers are aware of what's going on, and of the challenges you're facing. And they probably believe you're doing the best you can -- in my experience, anyhow, if they have any doubt about the earnestness of your efforts, they won't be shy about letting you know.

              Far as I know, proxabrushes are fine, and they can really help get some little sticking piece of food dislodged. Just be careful about not bending any wires or changing the arrangement of the devices in your mouth. (The only time I damaged the equipment, though, was when I was flossing! At least I didn't have to be embarrassed when I went in to get it fixed.)

              I, too, go in every three months for a cleaning, and alternate beween the perio lady and my general dentist. It was every two months while I was in the equipment.)
              In many years' experience, I've found there are two kinds of hygienists -- the ones who give demanding (and not always the best) advice. Some of these have presumed to give lectures and be otherwise obnoxious, to the extent that they really made me reluctant to go back in when I needed their attention. (I know that's childish. I'm too old to go that route, but sheesh! In a few cases, assistants have even given me advice that directly contradicted what the docs said! That makes me angry, and I tend not to put up with it. (Curiously enough, although I have known and been cared for by some excellent female dentists, I've never been attended by a male hygienist! I wonder why!)

              Anyhow, enough of that. I'll bet, though, that if you're concerned about keeping things clean, and making honest efforts in that direction, you are doing fine, as your experts have suggested.

              Your major concerns now should be getting well, recovering from the surgery, keeping nourished in support of the healing process. and if you do all that, I'd wager you and your docs will produce an outcome that pleases you all!

              Cammie
              --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@...> wrote:
              >
              > Cammie,
              >
              > This is exactly along the lines of what my surgeon has told me. I complained early on about not being able to brush very well because of some rubber bands in place, and he said, that is the least of your worries. I can't remember what the worries were at the time, but maybe that was after I had thrown up my nausea medicine and really needed to get a different one that actually worked. Luckily we did, and that was the worst the nausea got (although I still get it from time to time if I do too much).
              >
              > Then, the other day, I complained that I still couldn't brush as I liked, and he said, "Your teeth are clean...just not up to YOUR specs." Then, one time I brought up flossing, and we both agreed I probably couldn't physically do it yet (because of mouth opening), but again, he stressed that I was doing fine in keeping my mouth clean.
              >
              > I'm with you Cammie, though. I do worry because I am a plaque factory, too, and usually go every 4 months to the dentist, and no matter how much I floss/brush, from time to time, I still get "the lecture" from the hygenist. She looked very worried when I explained that I wouldn't be able to brush my teeth as much or as well after the surgery. My surgeon also said I probably won't even be able to go back to the dentist for a while...I think he said 8 or 9 months after surgery or something? Gees... Well, I guess I just need to trust him as I have to trust him in many things in this ordeal, that when he says I'm doing okay on keeping my mouth clean, I am. I guess that's why it's important to pick out a surgeon you know you can trust.
              >
              > I agree with you about the small brushes. For some reason, I've gravitated towards the kids brushes for a while now. I feel like they're more gentle, and I have more control, and they fit better on my teeth with the braces. I don't know if it's wise, but I've also been using those little brushes meant for going between braces or teeth to reach back to places where a toothbrush won't fit yet.
              >
              > Sheesh, Cammie, I'm glad I didn't have a splint (at least that kind).
              >
              > KC
              >
              > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@> wrote:
              > >
              > > You probably don't want to stress out a lot over brushing after surgery.
              > > I wasn't wired, or even banded. I do have a mouth that is, and has ever been, a plaque factory, Alas.
              > > But I got the distinct impression from my docs that they were telling me to do the best I could and not to panic.
              > > Yep, if you are asked to use a special mouthwash, do it. My ortho and my general dentist also like for me to use topical fluoride appliciations.
              > >
              > > You will find, I think, that a really soft, tiny little brush designed for infants can be helpful. Heaven knows you don't want to go in there anywhere near incisions or stitches with any tool or motion that's rough or tough. Just think gentle motions, and do the best you can! This period won't go on forever -- it's just while things are healing and vulnerable, so let things be.
              > >
              > > Yes, if you have a splint wired in, it's likely to get nasty. Should you develop thrush, that will also be nasty -- but your dentist can probably prescribe something to help with the thrush. (When time came for removal of my splint, one dental assistant said to the other, whom she was teaching, "All I can suggest is that you hold your breath." It had been wired in for seven weeks.) I did try to make it up to them by giving it, and my mouth, a good scrubbing and rinse with mouthwash, after it was removed.
              > >
              > > At some point, your surgeon may let you use a Water-Pik post op. DO NOT TRY THIS BEFORE THE SURGEON SAYS IT'S OK. You can destroy stitches, if you do, and that's not a good outcome.
              > >
              > > Mainly, though, just try not to stress about it. Nobody likes to have a mouthful of gunk -- but nobody (I've ever met, anyhow) likes to have a mouthful of braces, either, nor a splint wired in, except for what they can accomplish.
              > >
              > > Good wishes to all. Stay in touch with your docs, ask questions about anything that worries you, and do what you're told. They know what to advise, and given that most of them are kind and expert, will give you good advice. And do ask, before the surgery, where to call post-op, even if they're on vacation, for help if you need it. It's unlikely that you will, but just in case!
              > >
              > > Cammie
              > >
              > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I understand; I was afraid to brush at first, too. That is why I just started with the middle of the front teeth. I think you can ask your doctor as you go along what it is safe to do, too. (It was hard to remember everything aforehand so that is what I do sometimes--ask if I can now do such and such at a particular appointment).
              > > >
              > > > Yes, it's hard to know what to expect. I had heard such horror stories and seen my friend have such a hard time, that I expected the worse. I feel like so far it has gone better than expected, but there is still so much more of the recovery left that I know I'm not completely out of danger of a complication.
              > > >
              > > > Yes, I think so far I'm adjusting to my new appearance. It really doesn't seem that different from before, but perhaps time will tell. I had an open bite and a tilted bottom jaw, so it just seems like it makes my face more of what it should be, but still really I don't see a large change. I don't think my family and friends do either; one said the change is subtle. There is possibly still some slight swelling, but I think I can get a good sense. Perhaps, also, my doctor tried not to make a huge change in the appearance since he knew my reasons for the surgery were so little based on appearance. We went over my goals for the surgery a number of times in the preparation process so he knew what I wanted. It really is weird that I don't look so much different, though, since the movement was quite dramatic I think. I had such a huge open bite.
              > > >
              > > > KC
              > > >
              > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > I will be afraid to brush. I'll be too worried I will move something out of place since I am having upper jaw surgery too. I am so nervous about all this. Following your recovery has made it all very real for me. I know that I too will be experiencing, if not the same things, very similar things. Not that your recovery was complicated it's just the normal things to expect which seem to be enough. I can't imagine having complications.
              > > > >
              > > > > How have you adjusted to your appearance? I am sure the more you heal and the more the swelling goes down the more you start to see what you will look like. I am nervous about that as well. I hope I don't regret this. Sorry for all the questions, but to have someone go through this now is helpful and is good to get your feedback while your going through it.
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Brushing teeth is a progression which is why you have the prescription mouthwash to use at first. At first, all I could brush were the front teeth in the middle only and use the mouthwash (or maybe even just the mouthwash at first). After they took the rubber bands off at a week I could gradually brush all the front of my teeth even in the back. I can't open my mouth enough to brush the tops of the molars or behind the teeth yet, though. Last time I saw my doctor, he said the incisions were healing well, but otherwise I haven't really paid much attention to them. He also said I was doing a good job keeping my mouth clean (although it certainly doesn't feel like it). My upper palate is a little dull feeling (slightly numb). It's hard to describe, but at first, I was a little challenged with mouth and tongue movements. Trying to swish the mouthwash around was hard to do. Getting the food from the front of the mouth to the back was sometimes a challenge (depending on the consistency). I guess you can sort of talk pretty soon (my husband said I was bossing the hospital staff around fairly soon after the surgery)...it's just you don't feel like it...and it might be somewhat unintelligible at first. I used the whiteboard a lot at first and then it gradually faded out of use. It's moderately easy to talk now (over 2 weeks later) but I still get tired or dread it a little. But I wonder if at this point an unobservent stranger would notice I'd had surgery unless I told them. I still have some achiness/pain (especially if I talk a lot), but I guess it gets a little better every day.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > KC
              > > > > >
              > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > Yeah you need to take it easy for a while. Your body has a lot of healing to do.
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > How is brushing your teeth and how does your mouth feel with all the incisions and stitches? I am surprised your talking already...thats great and I am sure good for it.
              > > > > > >
              > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > I feel pretty good. Only slight swelling left, and my most of my chin is still partially numb. I'm anxious to see my doctors again since they're on vacation until early next week because I want to know how they think I'm doing. Oh, but I do have a feeling that if I did over exert myself, I might find myself not fully recovered yet. I saw that with the family Christmas activities. It left me a little nauseous for a spell from moving around more and my mouth was more sore from all the talking by the end of the night.
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > KC
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > Yeah thanks, me too! What a horrible time for something like this to happen!
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > How have you been feeling? Is your recovery getting better?
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > How horrible. I hope you can get it figured out quickly, and it works out.
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > KC
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > He said if he has to he will go to the HR department. The thing is I wasn't dropped, my husband didn't follow the instructions close enough and inadvertently didn't add me. I have been with my husbands insurance for 10 years. Also I am on everything else, vision, dental, etc...just not medical. They should see that it was a mistake....I hope.
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "keppers79" <kep-at-home@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > > That is kind of weird about the spam. And my messages don't seem to be going through at times, but I think that's just because I've been trying to reply on my phone, and maybe the phone is messing up.
              > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > > Do you have your own insurance you can switch to? I think being dropped from an insurance sometimes can qualify you to join your own insurance within 30 days. Usually, I think 30 days is the time frame after the effective date of the event (marriage, birth, being dropped from insurance, etc). Of course, I don't know if they sometimes have that nasty evidence of insurability clause in some of those cases (where they review your medical history and might throw in a pre-existing clause). I think it is usually final once the open enrollment is over, though. Can you husband inquire with his HR, though? If there are no other options, maybe you can look into COBRA?
              > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > > KC
              > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Elisann" <el_mcelwain@> wrote:
              > > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > > > I don't need spam from this group. I mean, don't approve the posts before they publish them?
              > > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > > > My question about insurance: my husband didn't carefully read the instructions for the open enrollment for our insurance next year and he didn't add me on by mistake. I am on everything else just not the medical. Has this happened to anyone before and how will this effect my coverage? I am so upset and stressed out now thanks to him not being careful. I worry they won't pay for it now.
              > > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > > >
              > > > > > > >
              > > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
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