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Re: Quick Question about infections?

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  • ucb_lilith
    I got them for about a week and still got an infection.......
    Message 1 of 18 , Jun 1, 2010
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      I got them for about a week and still got an infection.......



      --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hey everyone.
      >
      > I'm sure I'm not the only one who along with pain meds, was prescribed an antibiotic. It says "Take 3 times daily until prescription runs out."
      > I always thought that that isn't very descriptive. Does anyone know how long after surgery you have a chance of getting some sort of infection or have a reason to take the antibiotics?
      >
      > I'm just really curious about this. For some reason it interests me.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Ashley
      >
    • Cindi
      Yes, was given antibiotic also. My understanding is that it is to prevent infection from occurring. Think it is fairly standard practice. I think once you
      Message 2 of 18 , Jun 1, 2010
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        Yes, was given antibiotic also. My understanding is that it is to prevent infection from occurring. Think it is fairly standard practice. I think once you finish a preventive course (know there's another term, but can't remember it), they would only prescribe an antibiotic if an actual infection occurs. And an infection could crop up anytime whether related to surgery or not, I believe. Such as sinus infections, etc that some of us just get, in general. I guess alot depends on your immune system. And surgery does tend to knock it down. Don't remember doing this with gallbladder surgery. However, that was a piece of cake done outpatient. But I know you are always watched after any surgery for infection, such as the surgery site, etc. May depend on how intense the surgery is. Jaw surgery, especially upper and lower is very major surgery. Would be interested in what they do for folks having other types of surgeries, such as bypass or hysterectomy, etc. Those are pretty major. Don't know if this helps, but it certainly does pique one's curiosity. Good question, Ashley.
        Cindi

        --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hey everyone.
        >
        > I'm sure I'm not the only one who along with pain meds, was prescribed an antibiotic. It says "Take 3 times daily until prescription runs out."
        > I always thought that that isn't very descriptive. Does anyone know how long after surgery you have a chance of getting some sort of infection or have a reason to take the antibiotics?
        >
        > I'm just really curious about this. For some reason it interests me.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Ashley
        >
      • crybabychick1954
        Thanks Cindi. I was curious just because I honestly haven t taken much of my antibiotic. I m not trying to brag about my luck with lack of infections or
        Message 3 of 18 , Jun 1, 2010
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          Thanks Cindi. I was curious just because I honestly haven't taken much of my antibiotic. I'm not trying to brag about my luck with lack of infections or condone not taking antibiotics. However, after my first surgery, I only took it once a day for like 3 days post-op, and this time I did it even less than that. I'm fine. I was kind of curious if to be cautious, I should start taking it again, but I'm almost 2 weeks post-op and I'm fine so it seems like at this point, it might be pointless.

          Ashley

          --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@...> wrote:
          >
          > Yes, was given antibiotic also. My understanding is that it is to prevent infection from occurring. Think it is fairly standard practice. I think once you finish a preventive course (know there's another term, but can't remember it), they would only prescribe an antibiotic if an actual infection occurs. And an infection could crop up anytime whether related to surgery or not, I believe. Such as sinus infections, etc that some of us just get, in general. I guess alot depends on your immune system. And surgery does tend to knock it down. Don't remember doing this with gallbladder surgery. However, that was a piece of cake done outpatient. But I know you are always watched after any surgery for infection, such as the surgery site, etc. May depend on how intense the surgery is. Jaw surgery, especially upper and lower is very major surgery. Would be interested in what they do for folks having other types of surgeries, such as bypass or hysterectomy, etc. Those are pretty major. Don't know if this helps, but it certainly does pique one's curiosity. Good question, Ashley.
          > Cindi
          >
          > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hey everyone.
          > >
          > > I'm sure I'm not the only one who along with pain meds, was prescribed an antibiotic. It says "Take 3 times daily until prescription runs out."
          > > I always thought that that isn't very descriptive. Does anyone know how long after surgery you have a chance of getting some sort of infection or have a reason to take the antibiotics?
          > >
          > > I'm just really curious about this. For some reason it interests me.
          > >
          > > Thanks,
          > > Ashley
          > >
          >
        • ceast36532
          weeh-elll.. just not the very best idea you ve ever had. Congratulations if you ve pulled it off. But think a minute. You ve had a bunch of folks (in a
          Message 4 of 18 , Jun 1, 2010
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            weeh-elll.. just not the very best idea you've ever had. Congratulations if you've pulled it off.

            But think a minute. You've had a bunch of folks (in a hospital, where there are lots of other sick folks) cutting, slicing and stitching inside your mouth. Hospitals are, generally, where you get infections, these days.

            Your mouth isn't gonna be bigtime happy about opening up big, broad and wide for a while. And where do infections love to grow? In nice, warm, dark, moist places... Like mouths that aren't opening wide. (So do fungus infections, for that matter, and when meds kill off the flora/fauna that kill fungus, that's a whole 'nother set of problems.) This can happen in other body areas that usually don't see the light of day -- and I hope that's 'nuff said.

            In addition to that, your diet is changing -- and maybe to a lot of sugary stuff (Smoothies, ice cream, etc. -- or maybe you've worked out broth and carrot juice. If so, congratulations!) Still, be cautious about the stuff that makes infection and fungus grow. If not, you're likely to pay the price, and that isn't nice.

            Some of the antibiotics are nasty tasting, but there's no prize for ignoring them and having to flush expensive concoctions!

            Take it until it expires means, simply, take it, in the prescribed doses, until you don't have any more, or until it's out of date, but the latter won't generally happen if you do the former.

            If you do less, you may get away with it. But this surgery (and other things) can and do wear down your immune system. Although I took all the meds, I developed shingles. (They're viral, and, I believe I got the virus in a busy EENT office swarming with young children who could have had chickenpox. A family member and I also found really tough troubles, which turned out terminal for him, and don't doubt that my resistance was nil. But I would have given a lot for an instant-go-away anti-viral pill at that point.)

            Why risk it?

            C.
          • ceast36532
            I think, and I may be wrong, here, that this sort of underdosing use of antibiotics may be perzactly what is rendering them impotent... Take a bit. It doesn t
            Message 5 of 18 , Jun 1, 2010
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              I think, and I may be wrong, here, that this sort of underdosing use of antibiotics may be perzactly what is rendering them impotent...

              Take a bit. It doesn't quite wipe out the infection, but learns to keep it below Big Trouble levels and modifies both the antibiotic and the infection enough that they get to like each other a lot. The patient is fine, feels no troubles, and goes on off about daily life.

              So the next time the germs and antibiotics meet, the infection germs say, "Oh, Gee! Old friend Uncle Fred-ostreptus! He won't hurt us, and we can all have a picnic together inside patient Sally... And then Uncle Fred-ostreptus is welcome, but won't take any action against his nieces' next generation, the Sallysupercoccuses, who are trying (and succeeding) to set up light housekeeping in Sally's wound.

              And that's why we're finding increasingly difficult infections that don't respond to antibiotics, (I think that really potent, broad-band one called Vancomyacin, or something similar, is the one that can be losing its effectiveness -- ask your doc, if you're curious. I may not have the right name. But how frightening to have something the best previous drugs can't manage. It's an awful problem and can leave patients very, very sick.)

              I picked up something, maybe that MIRSA stuff, in a local hospital when I had a very minor piece of surgery that had nothing to do with jaw surgery. The operation was in September 2008, and it's still not nicely healed!

              Anyhow, please take all the prescriptions, as directed, unless your dc says no. As for what to do now, call your doc, fess up about what you did, and ask.

              It will probably all turn out well, and i doubt that your doc will fuss.


              C.
            • crybabychick1954
              At this point, I m not concerned at all and I don t see a point in calling up my doc to fess up. I didn t commit a crime and if something happens then it s
              Message 6 of 18 , Jun 2, 2010
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                At this point, I'm not concerned at all and I don't see a point in calling up my doc to "fess" up. I didn't commit a crime and if something happens then it's my fault, but it seems as though I'm in the clear. I take anything my OS says with a grain of salt anyway. I don't want to randomly start taking the antibiotics again because if they were supposed to be taken 3 times a day until gone, technically it would be gone by now. Something might be wrong with it. I'd have to read the bottle to be sure, but maybe it expires. Who knows?
                I'll take my chances. Not saying anyone else should, but at this point in healing, I feel secure.

                --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@...> wrote:
                >
                > weeh-elll.. just not the very best idea you've ever had. Congratulations if you've pulled it off.
                >
                > But think a minute. You've had a bunch of folks (in a hospital, where there are lots of other sick folks) cutting, slicing and stitching inside your mouth. Hospitals are, generally, where you get infections, these days.
                >
                > Your mouth isn't gonna be bigtime happy about opening up big, broad and wide for a while. And where do infections love to grow? In nice, warm, dark, moist places... Like mouths that aren't opening wide. (So do fungus infections, for that matter, and when meds kill off the flora/fauna that kill fungus, that's a whole 'nother set of problems.) This can happen in other body areas that usually don't see the light of day -- and I hope that's 'nuff said.
                >
                > In addition to that, your diet is changing -- and maybe to a lot of sugary stuff (Smoothies, ice cream, etc. -- or maybe you've worked out broth and carrot juice. If so, congratulations!) Still, be cautious about the stuff that makes infection and fungus grow. If not, you're likely to pay the price, and that isn't nice.
                >
                > Some of the antibiotics are nasty tasting, but there's no prize for ignoring them and having to flush expensive concoctions!
                >
                > Take it until it expires means, simply, take it, in the prescribed doses, until you don't have any more, or until it's out of date, but the latter won't generally happen if you do the former.
                >
                > If you do less, you may get away with it. But this surgery (and other things) can and do wear down your immune system. Although I took all the meds, I developed shingles. (They're viral, and, I believe I got the virus in a busy EENT office swarming with young children who could have had chickenpox. A family member and I also found really tough troubles, which turned out terminal for him, and don't doubt that my resistance was nil. But I would have given a lot for an instant-go-away anti-viral pill at that point.)
                >
                > Why risk it?
                >
                > C.
                >
              • ceast36532
                Good luck to you... Cammie
                Message 7 of 18 , Jun 2, 2010
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                  Good luck to you...

                  Cammie

                  --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > At this point, I'm not concerned at all and I don't see a point in calling up my doc to "fess" up. I didn't commit a crime and if something happens then it's my fault, but it seems as though I'm in the clear. I take anything my OS says with a grain of salt anyway. I don't want to randomly start taking the antibiotics again because if they were supposed to be taken 3 times a day until gone, technically it would be gone by now. Something might be wrong with it. I'd have to read the bottle to be sure, but maybe it expires. Who knows?
                  > I'll take my chances. Not saying anyone else should, but at this point in healing, I feel secure.
                  >
                  > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > weeh-elll.. just not the very best idea you've ever had. Congratulations if you've pulled it off.
                  > >
                  > > But think a minute. You've had a bunch of folks (in a hospital, where there are lots of other sick folks) cutting, slicing and stitching inside your mouth. Hospitals are, generally, where you get infections, these days.
                  > >
                  > > Your mouth isn't gonna be bigtime happy about opening up big, broad and wide for a while. And where do infections love to grow? In nice, warm, dark, moist places... Like mouths that aren't opening wide. (So do fungus infections, for that matter, and when meds kill off the flora/fauna that kill fungus, that's a whole 'nother set of problems.) This can happen in other body areas that usually don't see the light of day -- and I hope that's 'nuff said.
                  > >
                  > > In addition to that, your diet is changing -- and maybe to a lot of sugary stuff (Smoothies, ice cream, etc. -- or maybe you've worked out broth and carrot juice. If so, congratulations!) Still, be cautious about the stuff that makes infection and fungus grow. If not, you're likely to pay the price, and that isn't nice.
                  > >
                  > > Some of the antibiotics are nasty tasting, but there's no prize for ignoring them and having to flush expensive concoctions!
                  > >
                  > > Take it until it expires means, simply, take it, in the prescribed doses, until you don't have any more, or until it's out of date, but the latter won't generally happen if you do the former.
                  > >
                  > > If you do less, you may get away with it. But this surgery (and other things) can and do wear down your immune system. Although I took all the meds, I developed shingles. (They're viral, and, I believe I got the virus in a busy EENT office swarming with young children who could have had chickenpox. A family member and I also found really tough troubles, which turned out terminal for him, and don't doubt that my resistance was nil. But I would have given a lot for an instant-go-away anti-viral pill at that point.)
                  > >
                  > > Why risk it?
                  > >
                  > > C.
                  > >
                  >
                • LorriTiger
                  I both agree and disagree with you Cammie. I was not aware of this low-dosing phenomenon, and I don t see it as a good idea at all. But I don t think it s the
                  Message 8 of 18 , Jun 3, 2010
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                    I both agree and disagree with you Cammie.

                    I was not aware of this low-dosing phenomenon, and I don't see it as a good idea at all. But I don't think it's the major culprit either.

                    From what I've read (and I've done a substantial bit of reading on health issues like this) the main practice that is causing the antibiotics to not work is the wide spread and constant exposure we have to them. We ingest antibiotics in our meat, we rub them all over our hands daily in soaps and hand sanitizers, and we are now prescribed them from a very young age and much too often to "cure" small infections that don't need high courses of antibiotics.

                    In my life, I've taken antibiotics less than 10 times (I'm 27). The last two were once in college when I had a bad case of strep throat, and last year I had an ear infection from dirty ocean water that I was swimming in. Before that it had been years since I took any. I am very rarely "sick". People might say "well you're just a healthy person", but I'm really not.

                    I'm definitely NOT saying that you shouldn't take antibiotics that are prescribed to you, or that you should take less than you are prescribed. The medical community sets the levels and types of antibiotics that should be taken to cure certain ailments, and they are very intelligent people (with some glaring exceptions of course).

                    What I AM saying is that you should be wary of taking an antibiotic more than once every 1 or 2 years (especially for young children) so that you can build up your body's natural defenses. (My unsolicited advice does not apply to those with a weakened immune system, whether it is temporary, i.e. directly after surgery, or permanent, i.e. auto-immune disorders.)

                    Ok, anyway, that was my rant for the week, I believe. I didn't mean it to be, but some topics seem to spark a more immediate reaction than others.

                    Oh, and Cammie, I'd like to add to your "take all prescriptions" note. Take all prescriptions from a doctor you trust. If you do NOT trust your doctor's judgment, get a second opinion as soon as possible. And if you don't trust your doctor's judgment, you should probably get a new doctor as well.

                    Fast healing to all,
                    Rebel Y.


                    --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I think, and I may be wrong, here, that this sort of underdosing use of antibiotics may be perzactly what is rendering them impotent...
                    >
                    > Take a bit. It doesn't quite wipe out the infection, but learns to keep it below Big Trouble levels and modifies both the antibiotic and the infection enough that they get to like each other a lot. The patient is fine, feels no troubles, and goes on off about daily life.
                    >
                    > So the next time the germs and antibiotics meet, the infection germs say, "Oh, Gee! Old friend Uncle Fred-ostreptus! He won't hurt us, and we can all have a picnic together inside patient Sally... And then Uncle Fred-ostreptus is welcome, but won't take any action against his nieces' next generation, the Sallysupercoccuses, who are trying (and succeeding) to set up light housekeeping in Sally's wound.
                    >
                    > And that's why we're finding increasingly difficult infections that don't respond to antibiotics, (I think that really potent, broad-band one called Vancomyacin, or something similar, is the one that can be losing its effectiveness -- ask your doc, if you're curious. I may not have the right name. But how frightening to have something the best previous drugs can't manage. It's an awful problem and can leave patients very, very sick.)
                    >
                    > I picked up something, maybe that MIRSA stuff, in a local hospital when I had a very minor piece of surgery that had nothing to do with jaw surgery. The operation was in September 2008, and it's still not nicely healed!
                    >
                    > Anyhow, please take all the prescriptions, as directed, unless your dc says no. As for what to do now, call your doc, fess up about what you did, and ask.
                    >
                    > It will probably all turn out well, and i doubt that your doc will fuss.
                    >
                    >
                    > C.
                    >
                  • ceast36532
                    I doubt that we have any real disagreement. Certainly I m with you about overuse of antibiotics ... I don t want them in my meat or chicken (etc.) and buy
                    Message 9 of 18 , Jun 3, 2010
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                      I doubt that we have any real disagreement. Certainly I'm with you about overuse of antibiotics ... I don't want them in my meat or chicken (etc.) and buy free-range or non-antibiotic pumped stuff when I can afford it. Try not to get it in soaps and the like.

                      And I definitely agree that one should take all prescriptions "from a doctor you trust," or get a new doc! (I've known some who were much less bright, apparently, than you, alas. I've known some who were wonderful, too. And I don't hesitate to tell them that I only want antibiotics (or any other drugs!) when they really believe I need them. I'm no pill=taker, either, and neither do I like paying the bills for them!

                      The problem with taking only part of a prescription, though, is that in so doing one is apt to create another strain of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The bad bugs get just enough to immunize themselves, but not enough to wipe them out, as I understand it. That's why some docs go pretty directly to one of the big guns if something bacterial seems to be recalcitrant about healing.

                      Best,

                      Cammie

                      --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "LorriTiger" <ryurack@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I both agree and disagree with you Cammie.
                      >
                      > I was not aware of this low-dosing phenomenon, and I don't see it as a good idea at all. But I don't think it's the major culprit either.
                      >
                      > From what I've read (and I've done a substantial bit of reading on health issues like this) the main practice that is causing the antibiotics to not work is the wide spread and constant exposure we have to them. We ingest antibiotics in our meat, we rub them all over our hands daily in soaps and hand sanitizers, and we are now prescribed them from a very young age and much too often to "cure" small infections that don't need high courses of antibiotics.
                      >
                      > In my life, I've taken antibiotics less than 10 times (I'm 27). The last two were once in college when I had a bad case of strep throat, and last year I had an ear infection from dirty ocean water that I was swimming in. Before that it had been years since I took any. I am very rarely "sick". People might say "well you're just a healthy person", but I'm really not.
                      >
                      > I'm definitely NOT saying that you shouldn't take antibiotics that are prescribed to you, or that you should take less than you are prescribed. The medical community sets the levels and types of antibiotics that should be taken to cure certain ailments, and they are very intelligent people (with some glaring exceptions of course).
                      >
                      > What I AM saying is that you should be wary of taking an antibiotic more than once every 1 or 2 years (especially for young children) so that you can build up your body's natural defenses. (My unsolicited advice does not apply to those with a weakened immune system, whether it is temporary, i.e. directly after surgery, or permanent, i.e. auto-immune disorders.)
                      >
                      > Ok, anyway, that was my rant for the week, I believe. I didn't mean it to be, but some topics seem to spark a more immediate reaction than others.
                      >
                      > Oh, and Cammie, I'd like to add to your "take all prescriptions" note. Take all prescriptions from a doctor you trust. If you do NOT trust your doctor's judgment, get a second opinion as soon as possible. And if you don't trust your doctor's judgment, you should probably get a new doctor as well.
                      >
                      > Fast healing to all,
                      > Rebel Y.
                      >
                      >
                    • Cindi
                      I got mine too early (before the surgery) and had to throw some out. My surgeon was fine with that as long as I got some and he kept a close eye on me for
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jun 3, 2010
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                        I got mine too early (before the surgery) and had to throw some out. My surgeon was fine with that as long as I got some and he kept a close eye on me for infection. And I sure learned why little kids hate the taste of it (mine was liquid since I was wired shut, everything was liquid!) Just be sure to keep an eye on things and let them know if anything might signal an infection. I did take as much as would not be expired.

                        --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Thanks Cindi. I was curious just because I honestly haven't taken much of my antibiotic. I'm not trying to brag about my luck with lack of infections or condone not taking antibiotics. However, after my first surgery, I only took it once a day for like 3 days post-op, and this time I did it even less than that. I'm fine. I was kind of curious if to be cautious, I should start taking it again, but I'm almost 2 weeks post-op and I'm fine so it seems like at this point, it might be pointless.
                        >
                        > Ashley
                        >
                        > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Yes, was given antibiotic also. My understanding is that it is to prevent infection from occurring. Think it is fairly standard practice. I think once you finish a preventive course (know there's another term, but can't remember it), they would only prescribe an antibiotic if an actual infection occurs. And an infection could crop up anytime whether related to surgery or not, I believe. Such as sinus infections, etc that some of us just get, in general. I guess alot depends on your immune system. And surgery does tend to knock it down. Don't remember doing this with gallbladder surgery. However, that was a piece of cake done outpatient. But I know you are always watched after any surgery for infection, such as the surgery site, etc. May depend on how intense the surgery is. Jaw surgery, especially upper and lower is very major surgery. Would be interested in what they do for folks having other types of surgeries, such as bypass or hysterectomy, etc. Those are pretty major. Don't know if this helps, but it certainly does pique one's curiosity. Good question, Ashley.
                        > > Cindi
                        > >
                        > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Hey everyone.
                        > > >
                        > > > I'm sure I'm not the only one who along with pain meds, was prescribed an antibiotic. It says "Take 3 times daily until prescription runs out."
                        > > > I always thought that that isn't very descriptive. Does anyone know how long after surgery you have a chance of getting some sort of infection or have a reason to take the antibiotics?
                        > > >
                        > > > I'm just really curious about this. For some reason it interests me.
                        > > >
                        > > > Thanks,
                        > > > Ashley
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • Cindi
                        Cammie does have a point.
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jun 3, 2010
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                          Cammie does have a point.

                          --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > weeh-elll.. just not the very best idea you've ever had. Congratulations if you've pulled it off.
                          >
                          > But think a minute. You've had a bunch of folks (in a hospital, where there are lots of other sick folks) cutting, slicing and stitching inside your mouth. Hospitals are, generally, where you get infections, these days.
                          >
                          > Your mouth isn't gonna be bigtime happy about opening up big, broad and wide for a while. And where do infections love to grow? In nice, warm, dark, moist places... Like mouths that aren't opening wide. (So do fungus infections, for that matter, and when meds kill off the flora/fauna that kill fungus, that's a whole 'nother set of problems.) This can happen in other body areas that usually don't see the light of day -- and I hope that's 'nuff said.
                          >
                          > In addition to that, your diet is changing -- and maybe to a lot of sugary stuff (Smoothies, ice cream, etc. -- or maybe you've worked out broth and carrot juice. If so, congratulations!) Still, be cautious about the stuff that makes infection and fungus grow. If not, you're likely to pay the price, and that isn't nice.
                          >
                          > Some of the antibiotics are nasty tasting, but there's no prize for ignoring them and having to flush expensive concoctions!
                          >
                          > Take it until it expires means, simply, take it, in the prescribed doses, until you don't have any more, or until it's out of date, but the latter won't generally happen if you do the former.
                          >
                          > If you do less, you may get away with it. But this surgery (and other things) can and do wear down your immune system. Although I took all the meds, I developed shingles. (They're viral, and, I believe I got the virus in a busy EENT office swarming with young children who could have had chickenpox. A family member and I also found really tough troubles, which turned out terminal for him, and don't doubt that my resistance was nil. But I would have given a lot for an instant-go-away anti-viral pill at that point.)
                          >
                          > Why risk it?
                          >
                          > C.
                          >
                        • Cindi
                          Mine were 10 days, for the liquid at least. Don t know if you have that or were able to actually have pills.
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jun 3, 2010
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                            Mine were 10 days, for the liquid at least. Don't know if you have that or were able to actually have pills.

                            --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Good luck to you...
                            >
                            > Cammie
                            >
                            > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > At this point, I'm not concerned at all and I don't see a point in calling up my doc to "fess" up. I didn't commit a crime and if something happens then it's my fault, but it seems as though I'm in the clear. I take anything my OS says with a grain of salt anyway. I don't want to randomly start taking the antibiotics again because if they were supposed to be taken 3 times a day until gone, technically it would be gone by now. Something might be wrong with it. I'd have to read the bottle to be sure, but maybe it expires. Who knows?
                            > > I'll take my chances. Not saying anyone else should, but at this point in healing, I feel secure.
                            > >
                            > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > weeh-elll.. just not the very best idea you've ever had. Congratulations if you've pulled it off.
                            > > >
                            > > > But think a minute. You've had a bunch of folks (in a hospital, where there are lots of other sick folks) cutting, slicing and stitching inside your mouth. Hospitals are, generally, where you get infections, these days.
                            > > >
                            > > > Your mouth isn't gonna be bigtime happy about opening up big, broad and wide for a while. And where do infections love to grow? In nice, warm, dark, moist places... Like mouths that aren't opening wide. (So do fungus infections, for that matter, and when meds kill off the flora/fauna that kill fungus, that's a whole 'nother set of problems.) This can happen in other body areas that usually don't see the light of day -- and I hope that's 'nuff said.
                            > > >
                            > > > In addition to that, your diet is changing -- and maybe to a lot of sugary stuff (Smoothies, ice cream, etc. -- or maybe you've worked out broth and carrot juice. If so, congratulations!) Still, be cautious about the stuff that makes infection and fungus grow. If not, you're likely to pay the price, and that isn't nice.
                            > > >
                            > > > Some of the antibiotics are nasty tasting, but there's no prize for ignoring them and having to flush expensive concoctions!
                            > > >
                            > > > Take it until it expires means, simply, take it, in the prescribed doses, until you don't have any more, or until it's out of date, but the latter won't generally happen if you do the former.
                            > > >
                            > > > If you do less, you may get away with it. But this surgery (and other things) can and do wear down your immune system. Although I took all the meds, I developed shingles. (They're viral, and, I believe I got the virus in a busy EENT office swarming with young children who could have had chickenpox. A family member and I also found really tough troubles, which turned out terminal for him, and don't doubt that my resistance was nil. But I would have given a lot for an instant-go-away anti-viral pill at that point.)
                            > > >
                            > > > Why risk it?
                            > > >
                            > > > C.
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • crybabychick1954
                            I see. I agree that Cammie has a point as well, I just didn t appreciate the not the smartest thing you ve ever done remark. I think there are ways to answer
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jun 3, 2010
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                              I see. I agree that Cammie has a point as well, I just didn't appreciate the "not the smartest thing you've ever done" remark. I think there are ways to answer a question without coming across as judgemental. Everyone is different and based on all my previous experiences with antibiotics (i've had them for first surgery, wisdom teeth removal, a procedure to cut in and check on screws, and now this) and i've never had the slightest sign of a problem, which is why I felt safe not taking the entire dosage. I think people just need to know what works for them, what doesn't, and ask their doctor if they have any concerns.

                              Ashley

                              --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I got mine too early (before the surgery) and had to throw some out. My surgeon was fine with that as long as I got some and he kept a close eye on me for infection. And I sure learned why little kids hate the taste of it (mine was liquid since I was wired shut, everything was liquid!) Just be sure to keep an eye on things and let them know if anything might signal an infection. I did take as much as would not be expired.
                              >
                              > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Thanks Cindi. I was curious just because I honestly haven't taken much of my antibiotic. I'm not trying to brag about my luck with lack of infections or condone not taking antibiotics. However, after my first surgery, I only took it once a day for like 3 days post-op, and this time I did it even less than that. I'm fine. I was kind of curious if to be cautious, I should start taking it again, but I'm almost 2 weeks post-op and I'm fine so it seems like at this point, it might be pointless.
                              > >
                              > > Ashley
                              > >
                              > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Yes, was given antibiotic also. My understanding is that it is to prevent infection from occurring. Think it is fairly standard practice. I think once you finish a preventive course (know there's another term, but can't remember it), they would only prescribe an antibiotic if an actual infection occurs. And an infection could crop up anytime whether related to surgery or not, I believe. Such as sinus infections, etc that some of us just get, in general. I guess alot depends on your immune system. And surgery does tend to knock it down. Don't remember doing this with gallbladder surgery. However, that was a piece of cake done outpatient. But I know you are always watched after any surgery for infection, such as the surgery site, etc. May depend on how intense the surgery is. Jaw surgery, especially upper and lower is very major surgery. Would be interested in what they do for folks having other types of surgeries, such as bypass or hysterectomy, etc. Those are pretty major. Don't know if this helps, but it certainly does pique one's curiosity. Good question, Ashley.
                              > > > Cindi
                              > > >
                              > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Hey everyone.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > I'm sure I'm not the only one who along with pain meds, was prescribed an antibiotic. It says "Take 3 times daily until prescription runs out."
                              > > > > I always thought that that isn't very descriptive. Does anyone know how long after surgery you have a chance of getting some sort of infection or have a reason to take the antibiotics?
                              > > > >
                              > > > > I'm just really curious about this. For some reason it interests me.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Thanks,
                              > > > > Ashley
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • ceast36532
                              Ashley, I am sorry I have offended you yet again. I do many things daily that are far from the best choices I ve ever made, and then have to figure out what,
                              Message 14 of 18 , Jun 4, 2010
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                                Ashley, I am sorry I have offended you yet again.

                                I do many things daily that are far from the best choices I've ever made, and then have to figure out what, if anything, to do about them. So I guess I just don't take that phrase the same way you do. But then I probably am a lot older and more prone to misadventures than are you -- at 65. (Heavens, I wish I could make the best choice every time, right off the bat!) Anyhow, I hope you will not remain offended. I agree that you've had a heckuva lot of antibiotics; I'd just not stop one without at least a call first to my doc who prescribed it.

                                It seems to have worked out for you, so congratulations, as I think I said before!

                                I hope that he system you have chosen will serve you well, and I certainly agree that it's wise to consult with your docs if you're worried about overuse.

                                I also hope that all goes well for you.

                                Cammie

                                --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I see. I agree that Cammie has a point as well, I just didn't appreciate the "not the smartest thing you've ever done" remark. I think there are ways to answer a question without coming across as judgemental. Everyone is different and based on all my previous experiences with antibiotics (i've had them for first surgery, wisdom teeth removal, a procedure to cut in and check on screws, and now this) and i've never had the slightest sign of a problem, which is why I felt safe not taking the entire dosage. I think people just need to know what works for them, what doesn't, and ask their doctor if they have any concerns.
                                >
                                > Ashley
                                >
                                > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > I got mine too early (before the surgery) and had to throw some out. My surgeon was fine with that as long as I got some and he kept a close eye on me for infection. And I sure learned why little kids hate the taste of it (mine was liquid since I was wired shut, everything was liquid!) Just be sure to keep an eye on things and let them know if anything might signal an infection. I did take as much as would not be expired.
                                > >
                                > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Thanks Cindi. I was curious just because I honestly haven't taken much of my antibiotic. I'm not trying to brag about my luck with lack of infections or condone not taking antibiotics. However, after my first surgery, I only took it once a day for like 3 days post-op, and this time I did it even less than that. I'm fine. I was kind of curious if to be cautious, I should start taking it again, but I'm almost 2 weeks post-op and I'm fine so it seems like at this point, it might be pointless.
                                > > >
                                > > > Ashley
                              • ceast36532
                                I had some liquid stuff -- far from the nastiest or longest dose ever. About four or five days, I think. (I had told him that I usually have to take
                                Message 15 of 18 , Jun 4, 2010
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                                  I had some liquid stuff -- far from the nastiest or longest dose ever. About four or five days, I think. (I had told him that I usually have to take antibiotics before dental work, because I have an otherwise negligible heart murmur -- dental bacteria seem to love to set up light housekeeping in and around the heart.)

                                  And I actually had a friend who died after having undiagnosed heart murmur, then an abscess in a tooth. He developed endocarditis. But my surgeon told me he wasn't the least worried about that, because he'd really have me pumped full of the antibiotics for the surgery. I think they started them almost as soon as I got to the hospital at 12:01 that morning.

                                  cammie

                                  --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Mine were 10 days, for the liquid at least. Don't know if you have that or were able to actually have pills.
                                  >
                                  > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Good luck to you...
                                  > >
                                  > > Cammie
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > At this point, I'm not concerned at all and I don't see a point in calling up my doc to "fess" up. I didn't commit a crime and if something happens then it's my fault, but it seems as though I'm in the clear. I take anything my OS says with a grain of salt anyway. I don't want to randomly start taking the antibiotics again because if they were supposed to be taken 3 times a day until gone, technically it would be gone by now. Something might be wrong with it. I'd have to read the bottle to be sure, but maybe it expires. Who knows?
                                  > > > I'll take my chances. Not saying anyone else should, but at this point in healing, I feel secure.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "ceast36532" <ceast36532@> wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > weeh-elll.. just not the very best idea you've ever had. Congratulations if you've pulled it off.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > But think a minute. You've had a bunch of folks (in a hospital, where there are lots of other sick folks) cutting, slicing and stitching inside your mouth. Hospitals are, generally, where you get infections, these days.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Your mouth isn't gonna be bigtime happy about opening up big, broad and wide for a while. And where do infections love to grow? In nice, warm, dark, moist places... Like mouths that aren't opening wide. (So do fungus infections, for that matter, and when meds kill off the flora/fauna that kill fungus, that's a whole 'nother set of problems.) This can happen in other body areas that usually don't see the light of day -- and I hope that's 'nuff said.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > In addition to that, your diet is changing -- and maybe to a lot of sugary stuff (Smoothies, ice cream, etc. -- or maybe you've worked out broth and carrot juice. If so, congratulations!) Still, be cautious about the stuff that makes infection and fungus grow. If not, you're likely to pay the price, and that isn't nice.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Some of the antibiotics are nasty tasting, but there's no prize for ignoring them and having to flush expensive concoctions!
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Take it until it expires means, simply, take it, in the prescribed doses, until you don't have any more, or until it's out of date, but the latter won't generally happen if you do the former.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > If you do less, you may get away with it. But this surgery (and other things) can and do wear down your immune system. Although I took all the meds, I developed shingles. (They're viral, and, I believe I got the virus in a busy EENT office swarming with young children who could have had chickenpox. A family member and I also found really tough troubles, which turned out terminal for him, and don't doubt that my resistance was nil. But I would have given a lot for an instant-go-away anti-viral pill at that point.)
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Why risk it?
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > C.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • Cindi
                                  No opinion on how Cammie s message was delivered and no disagreement with you about using antibiotics. Only stating the content was a good point. It s very
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Jun 7, 2010
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                                    No opinion on how Cammie's message was delivered and no disagreement with you about using antibiotics. Only stating the content was a good point. It's very hard in a place like this where there is only written contact and nothing face to face to really understand what is behind someone's words. I think all of us would do well to take a deep breath. I hate seeing so many hurt feelings so often. I was in a position such as this with a sleep apnea group as well where I felt pretty frustrated, but I may not have heard all the messages because of how they were delivered. Trying to learn that better now. And it's something I have to watch for at work as well.

                                    --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I see. I agree that Cammie has a point as well, I just didn't appreciate the "not the smartest thing you've ever done" remark. I think there are ways to answer a question without coming across as judgemental. Everyone is different and based on all my previous experiences with antibiotics (i've had them for first surgery, wisdom teeth removal, a procedure to cut in and check on screws, and now this) and i've never had the slightest sign of a problem, which is why I felt safe not taking the entire dosage. I think people just need to know what works for them, what doesn't, and ask their doctor if they have any concerns.
                                    >
                                    > Ashley
                                    >
                                    > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > I got mine too early (before the surgery) and had to throw some out. My surgeon was fine with that as long as I got some and he kept a close eye on me for infection. And I sure learned why little kids hate the taste of it (mine was liquid since I was wired shut, everything was liquid!) Just be sure to keep an eye on things and let them know if anything might signal an infection. I did take as much as would not be expired.
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Thanks Cindi. I was curious just because I honestly haven't taken much of my antibiotic. I'm not trying to brag about my luck with lack of infections or condone not taking antibiotics. However, after my first surgery, I only took it once a day for like 3 days post-op, and this time I did it even less than that. I'm fine. I was kind of curious if to be cautious, I should start taking it again, but I'm almost 2 weeks post-op and I'm fine so it seems like at this point, it might be pointless.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Ashley
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@> wrote:
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Yes, was given antibiotic also. My understanding is that it is to prevent infection from occurring. Think it is fairly standard practice. I think once you finish a preventive course (know there's another term, but can't remember it), they would only prescribe an antibiotic if an actual infection occurs. And an infection could crop up anytime whether related to surgery or not, I believe. Such as sinus infections, etc that some of us just get, in general. I guess alot depends on your immune system. And surgery does tend to knock it down. Don't remember doing this with gallbladder surgery. However, that was a piece of cake done outpatient. But I know you are always watched after any surgery for infection, such as the surgery site, etc. May depend on how intense the surgery is. Jaw surgery, especially upper and lower is very major surgery. Would be interested in what they do for folks having other types of surgeries, such as bypass or hysterectomy, etc. Those are pretty major. Don't know if this helps, but it certainly does pique one's curiosity. Good question, Ashley.
                                    > > > > Cindi
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, crybabychick1954 <no_reply@> wrote:
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > Hey everyone.
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > I'm sure I'm not the only one who along with pain meds, was prescribed an antibiotic. It says "Take 3 times daily until prescription runs out."
                                    > > > > > I always thought that that isn't very descriptive. Does anyone know how long after surgery you have a chance of getting some sort of infection or have a reason to take the antibiotics?
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > I'm just really curious about this. For some reason it interests me.
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > > > Thanks,
                                    > > > > > Ashley
                                    > > > > >
                                    > > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • ceast36532
                                    Hello, Cindi! And thanks for your comments. Folks. I do not post to attack any of you. I am not hurt by your comments about me personally, and hope you are not
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Jun 7, 2010
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                                      Hello, Cindi!

                                      And thanks for your comments.

                                      Folks. I do not post to attack any of you. I am not hurt by your comments about me personally, and hope you are not hurt by my comments to you. I wish you all well, and only hope that you will find the experiences and therapies that help you best.

                                      Sometimes others' reactions can be unpredictable, I think. Nothing wrong with that, either.

                                      But could we please just stop about the personalities of those who post here? I don't think any of you is malicious, I don't think any of you is stupid or ill-educated -- and I know I'm not, thanks to the hundreds, if not thousands, of posts I've read here. I have learned a lot from other people generous enough to share their experiences, and am grateful to all.

                                      Anybody recovering from jaw surgeries has enough challenges healing, without any problems among us. Just about everybody who's been through any of this -- even braces alone -- has a perspective, and it seems to me that's what's useful about boards like this. If we've had different experiences, or drawn different conclusions, that doesn't make us enemies. Such can be helpful! It doesn't make me better than you, nor you better than me. We can learn from each other, or discard each other's suggestions.

                                      If my perspective doesn't work for you, more power to you, anyhow. Find and use what does work for you! I hope and trust that you and your caregivers will find your way through it all.

                                      And I agree: A deep breath never hurt anybody!

                                      Best wishes.

                                      Cammie

                                      --- In orthognathicsurgerysupport@yahoogroups.com, "Cindi" <cyd215@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > No opinion on how Cammie's message was delivered and no disagreement with you about using antibiotics. Only stating the content was a good point. It's very hard in a place like this where there is only written contact and nothing face to face to really understand what is behind someone's words. I think all of us would do well to take a deep breath. I hate seeing so many hurt feelings so often. I was in a position such as this with a sleep apnea group as well where I felt pretty frustrated, but I may not have heard all the messages because of how they were delivered. Trying to learn that better now. And it's something I have to watch for at work as well.
                                      >
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